Water Break

When membranes rupture during labour

Ask anything about water break

Is there a way to help my water to break at home?

Women can get their water to break with the help of a doctor, but it is not safe for them to attempt to break their water at home. However, there are many natural methods that women can use to encourage labor to begin once the pregnancy has reached full term. Can you make your water break at home? There are no proven safe ways for a woman to break her water at home. It can be dangerous if the water breaks before natural labor begins or before the baby is fully developed. During the natural process of labor, the water breaks when the baby's head puts pressure on the amniotic sac, causing it to rupture. Women will notice either a gush or a trickle of water coming out of the vagina. Many doctors say that women must give birth within 12–24 hours of the water breaking. After this time, a doctor may recommend a cesarean delivery to ensure the safety of the woman and the baby. This is because it is easier for bacteria to get into the uterus after the water breaks. This increases the risk of infection, which is a major complication that puts both the woman and the baby at risk. It may also make the birth more difficult. It is particularly dangerous to use artificial instruments to rupture the amniotic sac, as this can introduce bacteria into the uterus and cause infections. It could also injure the baby.   How to induce labor safely? The end of pregnancy can be exhausting. People believe that there are many ways to induce labor, from eating spicy food to going for long walks. There is little evidence to support most of these ideas. However, the following methods may safely help to induce labor, if the woman's body is ready. Women should only consider using these techniques to encourage the natural onset of labor once the pregnancy has reached full term. They should also confirm first with a doctor that their pregnancy is a low risk. The following tips can help you induce labor: Have sex: Having sex, particularly vaginal penetration, may help to start labour. It is not clear whether this is due to hormonal changes, physical stimulation, or something else. A 2014 study found a link between having sex during the last week of pregnancy and going into labor. Women whose water has already broken should not have sex as this can increase the risk of infection. Try nipple stimulation: Nipple stimulation may be a natural way to get the body to release oxytocin, a hormone that plays a key role in both labor and breast-feeding. Learn more about how nipple stimulation can induce labor. Eat some dates: A small 2011 study asked women to eat six dates per day during the last 4 weeks of their pregnancy. The researchers found that 96 percent of the women who ate dates had spontaneous labor, compared to 79 percent of those who did not. The women who ate dates also had greater dilation of their cervix during labour. Content source Featured image source

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Water breaking: What it feels like.

When your water breaks, it means your amniotic sac has ruptured and labour is imminent (if not already under way). But what does this actually feel like? Does it feel like a pop? Is it a big gush or a slow leak? The answer: Any of the above. Everyone's experience is different. Here's what some moms had to say: 1. The gush or splash For some moms, the water really does gush out – either in the hospital bed or in a more surprising setting: "A huge gush of fluid went all over the floor." "A huge rush of water came from deep inside. Weirdest feeling!" "It felt like a 5-gallon bucket of water had spilled out. With the next five contractions, more water came gushing out." "Flood!" "I got up and was walking into the kitchen when a massive amount of water gushed from between my legs." "An extreme gush – nothing like urinating. It didn't stop or slow down! Grossest feeling ever." "It was like someone put a hose on full blast between my legs." 2. The pop Many women feel a popping sensation when their water breaks. For others, the pop is audible: "There was a pop, like someone cracking a knuckle, and then a gush." "I heard a pop, then all of a sudden a large gush and a bunch of leaking." "I felt a popping sensation, followed by an immediate gush of very warm fluid that soaked through my pants. A little more would leak out every time I moved." "I'd already had an epidural and was lying in the hospital bed. It felt like a water balloon popped between my legs." "A water balloon popping. It didn't hurt; it just was suddenly very wet."   3. The trickle Many women experience trickling or leaking instead of the more dramatic gushing: "I felt a warm trickle of fluid down my legs." "It was so slow that I thought it was sweat or normal discharge." "I seriously thought I had wet my pants. I went to the bathroom three times and changed my clothes before realizing that I wasn't suffering from pregnancy incontinence. It didn't happen like in the movies." "I went for a walk at the hospital to relieve my contractions, and at one point I bent over to throw up. I thought the pressure of throwing up had made me pee – very embarrassing. It turned out that the pressure had actually made my water break." "I felt really wet, and it was slowly leaking. Over time, it began to leak more and more until it started gushing."   4. The in-betweener Not a dramatic gush, but not just a little trickle either – some women go for the middle ground: "It felt like small gushes, like when you first start your period." "Imagine a heavy period dripping down your leg." "I was shopping at a big store, and when I turned, I felt a small gush. It felt like period discharge." "It wasn't a trickle but not a gush either."   5. The feeling of relief Many moms feel a sense of relief when their water breaks. For some, their labor then gets more intense: "Relief! That's when it was time to push." "A huge pop, then relief from some of the pressure." "I only remember relief for a brief second and then more pain."   6. The unnoticed break Some women aren't aware of their water breaking: "I couldn't feel it because I had already had my epidural." "I didn't even know it broke until I realized I was wet." "I didn't know until I woke up and went to the bathroom and my underwear was wet." "I didn't feel it because my baby was crowning." "I didn't know what had happened. I got up and the chair was wet. I still didn't feel anything in particular except that afterward, the contractions hurt more." "I didn't realize it had broken until I saw the wetness on the hospital bed." "I felt nothing. I just noticed some leaking during contractions, and the nurse confirmed that it had broken, probably during an internal exam."   Content source Featured image source

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Never miss these top 10 vital signs and symptoms of labour

While there are characteristic changes in the body with impending labour, every woman's experience is unique and different. "Normal" can vary from woman to woman. The signs and symptoms of normal labor can begin three weeks prior to the anticipated due date up until two weeks afterward, and there is no precise way to predict exactly when a woman will go into labor. This article describes the 10 most common signs and symptoms that labor is approaching. 1. The baby drops Medically known as "lightening," this is when the baby "drops." The baby's head descends deeper into the pelvis. For some women, this occurs up to 2 weeks prior to the beginning of labor; other women may not notice this event at all. 2. An increased urge to urinate An increased urge to urinate can be a result of the baby's head dropping into the pelvis. The low position of the baby's head puts even more pressure on the urinary bladder, so many women approaching labor might feel a frequent need to urinate. As the baby drops, breathing can become easier since there is less pressure on the diaphragm from underneath. 3. The mucus plug passes Passage of the mucus plug is a known sign that labor is near. Thick mucus produced by the cervical glands normally keeps the cervical opening closed during pregnancy. This mucus plug must be expelled before delivery. Pressure from the baby's head causes the mucus plug to be expressed from the vagina, sometimes as blood-tinged vaginal discharge (referred to as "bloody show"). For some women, the mucus plug is not expelled until after labor begins; others may notice the mucus discharge in the days prior to the onset of labor. 4. The cervix dilates Dilation of the cervix is a sign that labor is approaching, although this is detected by the health-care professional during a pelvic examination. This begins in the days and even weeks prior to the onset of labor; "Fully dilated" means the cervix has dilated to a width of 10 cm. 5. Thinning of the cervix In addition to dilation, thinning (effacement) of the cervix also occurs. This occurs in the weeks prior to labor, since a thinned cervix dilates more easily. This sign is also detected by the health-care professional during a. 6. Back pain Many women note they experience back pain, especially dull pain in the lower back that comes and goes, as labor approaches. Back pain may accompany contractions felt in other locations or may occur on its own. Women also notice loosening of the joints, particularly in the pelvic area, as the third trimester progresses, in preparation for delivery. 7. Contractions Contractions, which can vary among women and can be described as pounding, tightening, stabbing, or similar to menstrual cramps, increase in strength and frequency as labor approaches. Irregular contractions, known as Braxton-Hicks contractions or "false labor," occur toward the end of pregnancy during the third trimester. Braxton-Hicks contractions are usually milder than those of true labor, and they do not occur at regular intervals. When contractions begin to occur less than ten minutes apart, this frequently signals the onset of true labor. 8. A burst of energy In contrast to feeling extra tired as is typical of pregnancy, many women describe feeling a sudden burst of energy and excitement in the weeks prior to labor. Often referred to as "nesting," this impulse often is accompanied by a sense of urgency to get things done or make plans for the baby. 9. Feeling the urge to have a bowel movement (diarrhea) Women often describe the pelvic pain and pressure as feeling the urge to have a bowel movement. Some women also report experiencing diarrhea or loose bowel movements in the days preceding labor. 10. Your water breaks Rupture of the amniotic membranes, or one's "water breaking," usually is a sign that labor has begun. Despite how it is often portrayed in movies, it is typically not a dramatic gush of fluid, but rather a slower dripping or trickle. Amniotic fluid should be colorless and odorless. It can sometimes be hard to distinguish from urine, but amniotic fluid does not have an odor. If you are leaking amniotic fluid, it is essential to contact your health-care professional right away.

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Water breaking: Understand this sign of labor

There are several questions that arise in women’s minds when they want to know about water breaking. Since, that is the major symptom of going into labor, women are confused and confounded with many questions related to it. We are going to deal with those in this article – What will happen when my water breaks? During pregnancy, your baby is surrounded and cushioned by a fluid-filled membranous sac called the amniotic sac. Typically, at the beginning of or during labor your membranes will rupture — also known as your water breaking. If your water breaks before labor starts, it's called premature rupture of membranes (PROM). When your water breaks you might experience a sensation of wetness in your vagina or on your perineum, an intermittent or constant leaking of small amounts of watery fluid from your vagina, or a more obvious gush of clear or pale yellow fluid. How can I be sure my water has broken? It is not easy to tell when your water has actually broken. Many women get confused – for example it might be difficult to tell the difference between amniotic fluid and urine — especially if you only experience a feeling of wetness or a trickle of fluid. If one is not sure as to what really has happened then it is best to consult your health care provider or head to your delivery facility right away. Your doctor or a member of your health care team will give you a physical exam to determine if you're leaking amniotic fluid After my water breaks, when will labor begin? Usually as soon as your water breaks, labor follows. However, if that is not the deal then your baby is at a risk of developing some health problems. The longer it takes for labor to begin after the water has broken, the more complicated the pregnancy becomes, hence leading to more chances of defects in the unborn child. What happens if my water breaks too early? If your water breaks before the 37th week of pregnancy, it's known as preterm premature rupture of membranes (preterm PROM). Risk factors for water breaking too early include: A history of preterm premature rupture of membranes in a prior pregnancy Inflammation of the fetal membranes (intra-amniotic infection) Vaginal bleeding during the second and third trimesters Smoking or using illicit drugs during pregnancy Being underweight with poor nutrition Short cervical length The below things are done to keep the mother to be safe and healthy - If you have preterm PROM and you're at least 34 weeks pregnant, delivery is generally recommended to avoid an infection. If you're between 24 and 34 weeks pregnant, your health care provider will try to delay delivery until your baby is more developed. You'll be given antibiotics to prevent an infection and an injection of potent steroids (corticosteroids) to speed your baby's lung maturity.   What if my water doesn't break on its own? There may be times when your water doesn’t break on its own, in these conditions it is the doctor who takes charge. During active labor, if your cervix is dilated and thinned and the baby's head is deep in your pelvis, your health care provider might use a technique known as an amniotomy to start labor contractions or make them stronger if they have already begun. During the amniotomy, a thin plastic hook is used to make a small opening in the amniotic sac and cause your water to break. There are various sensations that women describe how it feels when the water breaks. Some say it’s like a - gush or splash, a pop, a trickle, the in-betweener, a feeling of relief, the unnoticed break and the unstoppable force. Hence, there are various ways by which women can define their water to break, but the important part is that they know that the breaking of water means that the child is on his/her way. We hope we have covered all your questions in this article regarding the breaking of water. Sometimes your water might not break on its own, but don’t worry your doctor will know how to deal with it. Content Source Featured Image Source

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How Electronic Fetal Heart Monitoring Test Is Done?

If you’re pregnant your doctor wants to make sure your baby is healthy and growing as he should. One of the ways she does that is to check the rate and rhythm of your baby’s heartbeat. Fetal heart monitoring is part of every pregnancy checkup. It’s combined with other tests for a closer look if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or other conditions that could cause problems for you and your baby. Fetal heart rates also can help count your contractions and tell if you’re going into labor too early. How the Test Is Done Your doctor can monitor the baby’s heartbeat one of two ways. She can listen for and record the beats from your belly. Or once your water has broken and you’re in labor, she can thread a thin wire through your cervix and attach it to your baby’s head. From the outside: If your pregnancy is going normally, your doctor likely will check your baby’s heart rate with a hand-held device called a Doppler ultrasound. If you need it, your doctor might do a special test called a nonstress test, usually starting around 32 weeks of your pregnancy. It counts the number of times the baby’s heart speeds up during a 20-minute period. For the test, you'll lie down with a sensor belt around your belly. A machine will record the number of times the baby’s heart speeds up in a 20-minute stretch. If it’s fewer than 2, your doctor will run a longer test and try to wake the baby or make him stir with noise over your belly. Your doctor also may put you on a fetal heart rate monitor during your delivery. It can tell your doctor if the contractions are stressing your baby. If so, you might have to have your baby as soon as possible. From the inside: Once your water breaks and your cervix opens to prepare for birth, your doctor can run a wire called an electrode through it and into your womb. The wire attaches to your baby’s head and connects to a monitor. This gives a better reading than listening to his heartbeat from the outside. Content Source Featured Image Source

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When does your labour really start? 6 early signs & symptoms

There are a number of different signs that may indicate that labour is not too far away. These can occur as much as a week or more before labour begins. You may also feel contractions that make you think you’re experiencing the real thing, but turn out to be practice contractions. Wondering whether you’ll know when you are in early labour? You can find a list of the most common signs of labour given below:  Common Labour Signs Although every labour is different and there is no definite set of events, some common early signs of labour include: Lightening Your baby drops lower into your pelvis in the weeks or hours before labour. This is called lightening because you may find breathing a little easier as your baby will no longer be pressing against your diaphragm. On the other hand, you may feel like you need to urinate more often. A Change in Energy Levels You may be feeling extra tired or experiencing a sudden surge of energy in the days or weeks before labour. You might also have the urge to nest and get prepared for the baby. Bloody Show You might notice a thick, pinkish or blood-streaked discharge called a bloody show. This is the mucus plug that sealed your cervix during pregnancy. It usually appears within the two weeks before labour, although it’s not always noticeable. Water Breaking Water breaking is one of the most common labour signs, usually taking place up to a day before delivery (but sometimes only during active labour), when the amniotic sac ruptures and releases the fluid inside. You could experience a gush of water or just a trickle. If your water breaks, notify your doctor or midwife. Early Contractions These feel like menstrual cramps every 20 to 30 minutes, gradually becoming stronger and more frequent. When the contractions occur every three to five minutes, you’re in active labour. Time your contractions, or have someone time them for you. Diarrhoea Loose bowels could be an extra indicator that you’re going into labour. Definitely call your doctor or midwife if you notice bright red bleeding (not pale pink or dark brown), if your water breaks (especially if the fluid is green or brown or has a foul odour), if your baby is less active, or if you have a headache, vision problems, or sudden swelling, particularly in your face and hands. Also call your doctor if you are experiencing these symptoms before 37 weeks when they could signal preterm labour. What to Do When in Early Labour Don’t panic if you only experience a few signs of labour approaching, because many women don’t notice all of them. If you think you are in labour, call your doctor or midwife, whether it’s day or night. Tell them your symptoms of labour, and keep in mind you may not need to go to the hospital immediately. Your doctor or midwife will give you guidance based on your labour signs and your individual situation. Realising you're in labour can bring feelings ranging from excitement to disbelief or apprehension. Try to stay calm and focused. Arrange to have your partner or a family member with you to help record labour symptoms, keep you company, and get you to the hospital when the time comes. How to Tell Real and False Labour Signs Apart In your third trimester you may get ‘false’ or ‘practice’ contractions known as Braxton Hicks. These contractions may feel like the real thing, but if they don’t get stronger and closer together or come with other signs of labour, there is no need to call your doctor. These practice contractions are just one of the ways your body prepares for labour and nothing to worry about. Keep an eye out for specific symptoms that point towards real labour, such as the bloody show or any of the symptoms above. But to help you tell the difference between true and false labour contractions at a glance, see our table below. True Labour False Labour Contractions are regular and follow a predictable pattern (such as every eight minutes). Contractions are irregular and unpredictable, occurring, for example, in intervals of ten minutes, then six minutes, two minutes, eight minutes, etc. You experience three types of progression: contractions become closer in time, longer, and stronger. No progression is seen over time in the closeness of the contraction intervals, length, or strength of the contractions. Each contraction is felt starting at the lower back, radiating around to the front, low in the groin. Contractions are felt as a generalised abdominal tightening. A change in activity or position will not slow or stop contractions. A change in activity or position may cause contractions to slow or stop.   False labour pain can be triggered by a variety of causes, such as dehydration or a full bladder, or even when the mother and baby are active. But if you feel any of the symptoms of labour or notice that your contractions are getting closer together and more intense, then consult your healthcare provider. As you reach the end of your third trimester, the big day is coming up. To help you feel prepared, see our labour tips to help reduce any anxiety you may feel when you notice those early labour signs. You’re about to bring your baby into the world. You can do this! Content source Featured image source

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7 Signs of labor: Know what to expect

Pre-labour, or, the early signs of labour include… Mood swings In the day or two before you go into labour, you may notice heightened anxiety, mood swings, weepiness, or a general sense of impatience. (This may be hard to distinguish from the usual 9-months-pregnant impatience, we know.) It can also manifest in extreme nesting. These may all be early signs of labour; your whole body is getting ready for the main event. Cramps One of the first signs of labour is actually a familiar feeling: the pain that comes with menstrual cramps. If you’re starting to feel those diffuse discomfort and pain in the abdomen, it may be a sign that active labour is just a few hours away. Intense lower back pain Along with those seemingly familiar cramps is intense lower back pain. Sure, the final weeks of carrying around a giant human (and its liquid sustenance sac) make your back permanently sore, but this is different level of pain. And for people who experience it, it usually starts at the same time as the cramps. Spotting Another sign that your baby might be ready to start the process of shimmying down the birth canal is light spotting or slightly brown or pink discharge. This happens because the cervix is shortening and the tissue is thinning to prepare for your baby’s exit from the womb. (You may have heard the term “bloody show”? This is it.) You may even be so lucky as to pass a “mucus plug,” which is just what it sounds like, and which was blocking the opening of the cervix to protect against infection. Once that plug comes off, it’s a clear sign that the baby is ready to come out. (Don’t confuse light spotting or brown discharge with actual bleeding — if you see a flow if blood, that’s something you need to call your doctor about.) Upset stomach A few hours before labour begins, you may also feel some digestive discomfort, and even have diarrhea. This upset stomach is your body’s (clever) way of preparing you for delivery (by evacuating anything that might get in the way). Water breaking Contrary to what movies tell us, this rarely occurs to women as a sudden deluge while they’re standing in the supermarket; the vast majority of women experience labour without their water ever breaking at home or in a public place. (It usually happens when you’re already at the hospital.) But, for the women who do experience some version of the rupturing of the membranes before they get to the hospital, this can be a trickle of clear liquid. (Some women wake up thinking they’ve wet the bed!) If you experience any form of water breaking, call your doctor. Because this is a sign that the amniotic sac has ruptured, you may be more susceptible to infection after it happens; depending on your medical history and pregnancy, your doctor may want to see you, or ask you to come to the hospital, after this happens. Regular contractions Finally, probably the clearest sign that you’re in labour is regular contractions. You’ll know you’re experiencing contractions because they escalate. Over time, these signs of labour will get stronger (read: more painful), and they will become more frequent. If you notice there’s a pattern, you’re definitely in labour. Advice varies on what stage of process requires you to be at the hospital (or seen by a midwife or other birthing support professional), so seek advice from your doctor or midwife about how close your contractions should be when you make that call (and get moving). You’ve probably heard about the fakeout called Braxton Hicks contractions. These are not signs of labour — they are thought to be part of the way the body is preparing for labour. The main difference between Braxton Hicks and “real” labour contractions is that Braxton Hicks are not as painful; they are not steady, consistent, and escalating; and finally, they occur mainly around your belly (it looks/feels almost like the area around your belly tightens) rather than an overall sensation around your abdomen. But most important to remember: Braxton Hicks contractions go away eventually, they don’t get worse. Feature Image Source

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