Sensory Development

Sensory development is the gradual process by which an infant's senses begin to grow. These senses are sight, taste, touch, smell and hearing.

Ask anything about sensory development

Baby developmental milestones: 3 months

All babies have their own timetables. Little boys and girls simply grow and develop at their own rates, and on their own unique schedules. However, there are several common markers you can watch for. Celebrate with your baby as he reaches or nears the following key developmental milestones. May raise head and chest while on tummy: For your baby, holding up his head and chest while leaning on his elbows will be a major triumph. Hold a toy in front of your baby to encourage him to lift his head and look forward. This strengthens his neck muscles. Opens and shuts hands: Is your baby staring at her hands a lot these days? She's just discovered that she can open and shut them. Press a lightweight toy or rattle in her hand and she'll grip it, explore or shake it, and drop it when she loses interest. Pushes down on legs when feet are on a firm surface: Let your baby stand for a few seconds with some help from you. Hold him in a standing position with his feet on the floor and he'll push down and straighten his legs. Let him bounce a couple of times if he tries. May swipe at dangling objects and may grasp and shake hand toys: Your baby is learning hand-eye coordination. Lay her under an infant gym and she'll throw her whole body into batting and grabbing for the dangling toys. Hold a toy in front of her while she's sitting on your lap and let her try to reach for it. Can start to follow moving objects with eyes: Your baby's eyes can move and focus at the same time now. He may follow an object moving all the way around in a half-circle. He loves watching things move! Jiggle a mobile above his crib. Watching it will be a favourite activity. Recognises familiar objects and people at a distance: At birth, your baby could only see fuzzy shapes. Now she can recognize the outline of a face when someone enters the room. She even may smile at you from across the room! Take her out often in her stroller or baby carrier and let her discover all there is to see. May make cooing sounds and turns head towards some sounds: Is your baby cooing, aahing, and oohing? He's starting to imitate sounds, the first step to speech. Coo back to him and he'll begin to understand how two people talk. Sprinkle real words into talks with baby, too. He'll understand words long before he can say them. Content source Featured image source

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Baby's First Year

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Help your Baby Develop Through Fun

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Infant Development Milestone Chart

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Four-weeks old baby: Health, growth, care and more

At 4 weeks, your baby is almost a month old and you've both gone through an enormous amount of change in a very short period of time. Before you do anything else, give yourself a pat on the back for making it this far and recognise all that you have accomplished since you met your little one. You’ve made it through sleepless nights, struggled through feedings, and learnt to do pretty much any task one-handed. But just like every new week so far, there’s plenty more in store for both of you! Here’s what you need to know about your 4-week-old baby. Developmental Milestones: Some babies will develop a little faster than others and some babies may need time to “catch up.” At 4 weeks old, your baby might be able to: Body Hold their head up for a few minutes Lift hands toward the face or mouth, but it won’t be long before they reach their mouth! Control more head movement, like turning the neck from side to side Make jerky, quivering arm thrusts Keep hands in tight fists Continue strong reflex movements Brain Recognize you, your partner, or family members with widened eyes  See more clearly, up to about 18 inches in front of them Listen intently when you speak or sing Start to coo May turn toward familiar sounds, including your voice. Hearing is fully developed at this stage. Study human faces Baby Care Basics: By four weeks, chances are you’ve become a diaper-changing pro! Whether you are using cloth diapers or disposable diapers, your little one may start experiencing a diaper rash from time to time, especially during the summer months. To help prevent and treat diaper rash: Change your baby’s diaper more frequently: As soon as you notice the diaper is wet or soiled during the day, change it.  Use a diaper rash cream: You can apply a diaper rash cream as a preventive measure, especially if your baby is prone to getting rashes.  Air it out: The best way to prevent and treat diaper rash is to let your baby go all-natural.    If your baby seems excessively uncomfortable, especially after a feeding, they may be experiencing gas. Try these helpful tips: Burp after feedings: Be sure to burp your baby from the bottom upward to facilitate the air movement. Switching formulas: Your infant may need to change formulas several times before finding one that works best for their digestive system. Change bottles: Bottles and nipples are all made differently, so it might be helpful to try several types of bottles and nipples that have different kinds of airflow to experiment with what reduces gas in your little one. Health & Safety At 4 weeks old, your baby will have another well-child check-up. At this visit, the pediatrician will evaluate your baby’s growth and development and go over important safety guidelines with you. You can expect to be asked about: Your home environment: If you smoke, you should quit to reduce the risk of SIDS and increase your baby’s health. No smoke or secondhand smoke should be around the baby. Car seat safety: At 4 weeks old, your infant should be in a rear-facing infant seat. Vaccines: The second dose of the Hepatitis B vaccine may also be administered at this visit. Content source Featured image source

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Games for newborn babies  

0-3 Month Old Games Motor Games and Activities Place baby on their tummy to play for a few minutes at a time, a few times a day Lie down and place baby tummy down on your chest so you’re face-to-face Hold baby’s hands and clap them together while you play music and sing Nestle baby close to you while you gently rock and sway Change the direction that baby sleeps to encourage head turning and build strength Sensory Games and Activities Hang a colorful mobile above baby’s crib to provide visual stimulation Gently touch and tickle baby to make them giggle Play with baby in a variety of positions Provide plenty of skin-to-skin contact with a parent or caregiver Smile at baby, touch her hands, feet and forehead. See how she wiggles, reacts to touch and voices Play or sing songs with baby to help enhance baby’s listening skills When changing baby’s diaper touch different body parts and say “beep” baby may begin watching your hand and anticipating touch. Hang a mirror on the wall. Tap the mirror and say baby’s name. Over time baby will begin to understand who the baby in the mirror is. Show baby family photos or flip through a magazine. Point out the smiling faces to baby Communication Games and Activities Speak in a high-pitched, sing-song voice to help get and keep baby’s attention while you talk Describe your actions as you dress, feed, and bathe your child. Talk about where you’re going and what you’re doing. Give baby frequent face-to-face time Shake a rattle up and down while singing to baby Show pictures of family and friends and point out smiling faces Hold up a doll or stuffed animal and point out the different body parts  Feeding Games and Activities   4-6 Month Old Games   Motor Games and Activities Place baby on their tummy to play in short spurts for up to an hour over the course of the day Place baby tummy down on a blanket and move the blanket slowly around the room Allow baby to explore age appropriate toys with their mouth and tongue (be sure that the toys are large enough so that baby does not risk choking) Encourage baby to practice repeated rolling from back to tummy. Place toys around to encourage pivoting Sensory Games and Activities Encourage baby to touch fabric with different textures such as wool, corduroy, and velvet Lift baby up and down and play in different positions to help develop their sense of movement and balance Find balls with different textures and colors. Teach baby how to roll, drop, and bounce them. Communication Games and Activities Play peek-a-boo Use a variety of facial expressions while you talk Read with baby. “Reading” can simply mean describing pictures without following the written words. Encourage two-way communication. When baby coos or babbles, be sure to respond and take turns in “conversation”. Play with rhymes and songs Encourage baby to play with toys that make sounds Feeding Games and Activities Collect a variety of scents (flowers, spices, cookies) and pass them under baby’s nose one at a time to see what kinds of smells they prefer 7-9 Month Old Games Motor Games and Activities Put a toy or book inside an empty cardboard box. Wrap it with colorful paper or newspaper comics. Clap your hands when baby yanks it open then announce what is inside. Encourage movement by placing toys around baby where they must move to reach them Encourage baby pushups during Tummy Time by raising and lowering a rattle over baby’s head Engage baby in activities like reading or playing with a ball while in sitting Gently push baby back and forth on a swing in the park, but make sure baby can sit up and hold head steady with no problem When baby is holding a toy in each hand offer a third toy; watch as baby figures out how to grasp the new toy without letting go of the other two Punch holes in lid of empty food container and fill with water to make a fun bath time toy Get an empty plastic bucket and have baby throw toys into it Use different household items , like squeeze toys or newspapers to make different noises for baby Sensory Games and Activities Use your hands to make shadow puppets for baby Gently touch baby on the feet and tummy to make them giggle Play with a jack in the box or windup toy with baby to show motion Use animal sounds when playing with or reading to baby; point out an image of an animal then associate the sound that animal makes with the picture Walk with baby in a carrier or baby backpack Play with baby in many different positions Take baby on a walk in a stroller or jogger Use slow, rocking motions for calming and more vigorous motions for play time Give baby space to explore environment, while staying close to supervise Introduce new textures while baby is eating, sleeping, dressing, or playing outdoors, use a variety of sponges, soaps, and lotions during bath time Provide plenty of skin-to-skin contact with a parent or caregiver Encourage baby to play on the floor with toys of various colors, sizes, and shapes Allow baby to grab and explore items within reach Communication Games and Activities Draw a picture of baby’s face and then point out the different parts Play with a pretend phone; talk into phone as you would a regular call, then offer it to baby to do the same Read short stories with baby Start using hand movements along with associated words to teach baby to communicate with gestures Describe your actions throughout the day as you dress, feed, and bathe baby. This gives baby an opportunity to listen to the sounds and rhythms of speech Respond to baby’s sounds and encourage two-way communication Play music throughout the day – lively, upbeat music during playtime, and quiet melodic music for naps and bedtime Read picture books together to help baby connect words and images Give baby frequent face time Point out objects while you walk and talk with baby Feeding Games and Activities Try introducing pureed foods to baby. Puree a small amount of whatever you are having for dinner in a food processor, but be sure to avoid honey, cow’s milk, salt, and artificial sweeteners Introduce new foods gradually and watch for baby’s response Do not force food or show stress over a baby’s dislike for certain foods Change the texture of food if baby refuses food Provide baby with a healthy diet – avoid artificial ingredients, sugars, and preservatives 10-12 Month Old Games Motor Games and Activities Get baby to stack toys such as blocks or rings and describe each toy as your baby picks it up Lie down on the floor and have baby crawl over you Practice new gestures with baby like blowing kisses, clapping hands, or giving a high five Use a toy to encourage baby to crawl when they are in a tummy time position Roll a soft ball across the floor and encourage baby to crawl after it Allow baby to play with toys they can push or pull across the floor Read with baby while they lie on their tummy Play with stackable blocks Let baby play with large objects like tunnels, pillows, or cushions while supervised If baby is already walking, let them try riding toys that they can sit on and scoot across the floor Provide push toys that allow baby to practice walking with some support Encourage baby to dance and sway to music Provide opportunities for baby to experience slow, rocking movements Sensory Games and Activities Play peek-a-boo with baby Have baby look at their reflection in the mirror and point out each body part Encourage baby to crawl over, under, and through various objects in your home Introduce baby to new textures through food, toys, clothes, sponges, etc. Provide plenty of skin-to-skin contact with caregivers Keep baby away from areas where people are smoking or using harsh chemicals Communication Games and Activities Practice waving bye-bye when a guest leaves your home Read daily from big, colorful books and let baby turn the pages Encourage baby to wave hello when meeting new people Ask baby to point to different body parts when you name them Ask baby questions and encourage response with words, baby sounds, cooing, or babbling. Record the conversation and play it back for baby to hear Direct baby’s attention to interesting objects by helping them point their finger Name textures, shapes, and sizes to help baby attach words to tactile experiences Describe your actions throughout the day as you dress, feed, and bathe baby Respond to baby’s sounds to encourage two-way communication Feeding Games and Activities Offer baby an assortment of food to try Keep track of where baby is in their feeding development, well meaning friends and family may give baby food inappropriate for their age  

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What can you expect your baby to be doing at four months old?

Your baby at four months old At four months old your baby's development will be speeding up. Along with improved senses, they will likely be going through the early stages of speech development and may even have the early signs of their first teeth.   Your baby’s senses at four months old Further development of their touch Your baby will be fascinated by anything with a texture now – crinkly, shiny, lumpy or furry. Most of the objects they touch, whatever their texture, will go straight in their mouth. Sometimes they will hit themselves in the face with the toy and cry, giving you a look as if to ask, ‘Why did you do that, Mum?’ What your baby can see Their vision has really come on since those first few fuzzy images at birth – your baby can now see across the room, although they will still prefer to look at things close-up. If you can see any squint, contact your health visitor as it’s important to get checked out. Although they can see colour from birth, your baby will now be much better at distinguishing between different shades, being able to more accurately work out the difference between similar shades. This can be a great time to introduce more colourful toys and books which they’ll love looking at. Your baby’s motor skills at four months old Speech development If you listen carefully to your baby’s babble you may be able to make out vowel and consonant sounds: p and b sounds when they’re unhappy and guttural sounds like j and k when they’re happy. They may also be able to imitate the sounds you make now, so if you say boo, they may try to say it back. Rolling on Rolling over is more likely now. The age at which babies first roll over varies – some are ready at three months, some not until six or seven months. So it may happen this month. Or it may not. You can’t force it but you can gently encourage it by putting a favourite toy by their side and see if they roll over to get it. You may also notice that whilst laying on their front, they’re able to arch their back. This is a good exercise that can help them develop their neck muscles further and is a good way for them to start developing the muscles they’ll need to sit up and eventually crawl, stand and walk.  

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8 Fun Indoor Activities To Play With Your Baby

It’s easy to get a little stir crazy when you and baby are stuck inside all day. Fear not—there are plenty of fun baby activities to keep your little one busy. The best part? Many of these interactive indoor activities for babies require a low lift from Mom and Dad. From sensory activities for infants to fun crafts projects, these are our favorite ways to keep infants busy. 1. SENSORY BAGS This idea is one of the best sensory activities for infants. All you need is a plastic bag, some water, tape and a sensory item of your choosing. The sensory bag lets baby discover things that are normally off-limits (think: hair gel, toothpaste, body lotion, etc.). Your curious infant will love squishing the different textures. Plus, by fastening the bag to a wall, it’ll encourage baby to practice reaching and balancing all on their own. 2. FABRIC FUN Want to keep baby engaged for good long while? Just grab an old wipe container and fill it with washcloths, bibs and other scraps of fabric. Not only will babies have a blast opening and closing the lid and pulling bits of fabric out, but they’ll also strengthen their tactile and fine motor skills as they discover different materials and their textures. This DIY toy idea is one of the most fun things to do with babies when you’re bunkered down inside. 3. RAINBOW RIBBONS Simple baby activities are the best way to keep your little one engaged. Grab a bunch of ribbons from your craft closet, cut them into strips and then hang them from baby’s play gym, a drying rack or anything you may have lying around the house. Your kid will build upper body strength and motor skills as they try to latch onto the ribbons. 4. BABY COLLAGE Another fun idea with the help of a few household items to encourage baby to crack into their creativity. Tape a piece of clear construction paper to a window and let your baby use it as a blank canvas to craft funky designs. Cut up scraps of tissue paper and show baby how they easily stay on the sticky surface. Your little one will follow your lead and keep busy all day. 5. STICKY SITUATIONS Once babies are past the six-month mark, they’ll want to grab and toss everything they set their sights on. One of the baby activities provides your little one with a toy ball you won’t mind them playing with. Using a plastic ball—the balls from blow-up ball pits work perfectly—grab some masking tape and wrap it up to create layers of sticky sensations for baby to grasp. The tape will stick to little hands, and youngsters will marvel at the makeup and material of the ball. 6. SPIDEY SENSES Every parent wants their kid to be problem-solver when they grow up. Grab a laundry basket and toss all those toys lying around your living room into it. Then weave yarn in, out, up and down, and now the baby will have to find a way around the spider web-like maze in order to get his toys back. 7. FIRE AND ICE When it comes to baby activities, simplicity is key. Introduce baby to the concepts of hot and cold. All it takes is two plastic bottles—one filled with ice and another with warm water. Place the baby on the floor, hand over the bottles and let them marvel at how two of the same objects can feel drastically different. Keep your baby busy, quiet and, most importantly, intrigued for nearly half an hour. 8. SHINE BRIGHT Everyday baby is discovering something new, which is why it doesn’t take much to tap into their curiosity. All it takes is for your phone to light up with a notification and it immediately has your little one’s attention. Find a small set of string lights and stuff them into a plastic jar. Hit the switch and watch as the container and your infant’s face light up. Your kid will be enthralled by the bright lights, and you can periodically switch it on and off to keep them on their toes. Content Source  Featured Image Source

Why do babies wake up at night?

A common question breastfeeding mothers have is how to cope with their baby waking up at night. They may be feeling exhausted or even resentful about constantly broken sleep. Or they may have been told it is not normal for a baby to wake at night after a few weeks of age and that their baby is manipulating them and needs to learn to “self-soothe”. Some mothers may wonder whether to try night weaning, sleep training or whether to stop breastfeeding to find the answer to unbroken sleep.  Given below are some of the reasons why babies begin waking up more frequently at night:  Too busy to breastfeed: As babies grow, they become more aware of their surroundings. Typically around four months of age is a common time when mothers notice their baby may be forgetting to breastfeed in the day as they are easily distracted by new adventures. This can mean they wake up more at night to breastfeed to make up their calories.  New developmental stage: It is quite common for a baby who previously slept through the night to start waking more at night once they are mastering a new skill. Developmental changes such as learning to roll over, crawl, teething, or a growth spurt can all affect night waking and this can continue for quite some time in cycles. Hunger: It’s accepted that tiny babies wake at night because they are hungry. If you have a low milk supply, it may cause them to wake up. If your baby has a lot of trouble sleeping, fusses at the breast and has poor weight gain, review their growth chart with your health professional and contact a breastfeeding specialist to boost your milk supply. Illness: If your baby is unexpectedly waking at night or finding it difficult to sleep, check if they are sufferinig from any health issue. Ear ache or teething pain are common causes for difficulty sleeping. A breastfeed is a great comfort for a baby or toddler who is not feeling well. Reverse cycling: If you have recently gone back to work or are busy with time away from your baby; increased night waking can be a reaction to spending less time in your arms during the day. Some babies prefer to make up for missed breast milk at night by reverse cycling (feeding frequently at night). Waking from cold: Babies often wake from the cold, particularly once they are active enough to kick off blankets. The temperature between 3-5 am is often significantly cooler than when you put your baby to bed. If your baby is waking around 3-5am and can self-settle at bedtime, then cold is highly likely to be the reason.  Content source Featured image source

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Best toys for 3-6-month-old babies

In the 3-6 month age range, your baby will begin to start playing with toys as he figures out what his hands, feet and voice can do. Toys during this phase need to be big enough that they cannot be put in the mouth since this is the age where everything finds its way to the child’s mouth. Be sure to check labels on all toys to ensure that they are appropriate for this age. Small parts and anything that can cause suffocation or strangulation should not be given to children from 3-6 months old. Check out the best toys for 3-6-months-old that can help your baby develop both his body and his mind. These are best toys for 3-6-month-olds:  1. Activity Center An activity center is a great toy for a child 3-6 months old since it provides a series of activities that your baby can use to begin to develop motor skills. Until your baby begins to sit up on his own, an activity center in the crib is a good option. Once the baby can sit up and wants to be more mobile, a free standing activity or one on a mat on the floor will be the best option. 2. Lightweight Rattles This is the age when a rattle becomes an interactive toy for your child. Until about the age of 3 months-old, your baby will react to you shaking a rattle. During the 3-6 month range, your developing child will reach for the rattle and begin to shake it himself. By this age, most babies are intrigued by anything that makes noise – as long as they are not startled by loud noises. A rattle or musical rattle will be a perfect toy. 3. Activity Bars An activity bar with hanging toys may be a perfect toy when your child is confined to a stroller or car seat. These toys allow your child to interact by hitting the toys and making noise if they contain rattles. Since these toys can be distracting for a tired baby, you may find that you want to reserve these toys for “awake” time. Baby’s crib may not be the right place for this toy. 4. Stuffed Animals A safe stuffed animal is one that a child can sleep with without having to worry about buttons that can come off or wires that can poke the baby. A perfect stuffed animal is one that is soft without ANYTHING that the child could remove and choke on. Remember, this is the age where your child will want to “taste” everything. 5. Bumbo As your 3-6 month-old learns to sit up, a Bumbo seat may be a perfect way for your child to be upright. These seats provide the stability your developing child needs and is a perfect size to take with you when you go visiting or when you go to a restaurant. Very light weight, the Bumbo will take up very little room in your car but should NOT be used as a car seat for a child of any age. 6. Musical Toys Musical toys are great at any age, but the 3-6 month-old range is when a child will really begin to understand that music can be enjoyable to make as well as listen to. Many age-appropriate musical toys that can be purchased including those that have built-in music and those require your child to do something to make the music. Either way, your child can begin to discover the joys of music during this time. Content source Featured image source

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Most Recommended Games for 0-6 Month Old Babies

Babies need stimulation from an early age. The parents/caregivers should play various games with their baby to enhance his/her growth. Here are some games that can be played with babies. 0-3-Month-Old Games 1. Motor Games and Activities • Place baby on their tummy to play for a few minutes at a time, a few times a day • Lie down and place baby tummy down on your chest so you’re face-to-face • Hold baby’s hands and clap them together while you play music and sing • Nestle baby close to you while you gently rock and sway • Change the direction that baby sleeps to encourage head-turning and build strength 2. Sensory Games and Activities • Hang a colourful mobile above the baby’s crib to provide visual stimulation • Gently touch and tickle baby to make them giggle • Play with the baby in a variety of positions • Provide plenty of skin-to-skin contact with a parent or caregiver • Smile at baby, touch her hands, feet, and forehead. See how she wiggles, reacts to touch and voices • Play or sing songs with the baby to help enhance baby’s listening skills • When changing the baby’s diaper touch different body parts and say “beep” baby may begin watching your hand and anticipating touch. • Hang a mirror on the wall. Tap the mirror and say the baby’s name. Over time baby will begin to understand who the baby in the mirror is. • Show baby family photos or flip through a magazine. Point out the smiling faces to baby 3. Communication Games and Activities • Speak in a high-pitched, sing-song voice to help get and keep baby’s attention while you talk • Describe your actions as you dress, feed, and bathe your child. Talk about where you’re going and what you’re doing. • Give baby frequent face-to-face time • Shake a rattle up and down while singing to the baby • Show pictures of family and friends and point out smiling faces • Hold up a doll or stuffed animal and point out the different body parts 4. Feeding Games and Activities • Collect a variety of scents (flowers, spices, cookies) and pass them under baby’s nose one at a time to see what kinds of smells they prefer 4-6 Month-Old Games 1. Motor Games and Activities • Place baby on their tummy to play in short spurts for up to an hour over the course of the day • Place baby tummy down on a blanket and move the blanket slowly around the room • Allow baby to explore age-appropriate toys with their mouth and tongue (be sure that the toys are large enough so that baby does not risk choking) • Encourage baby to practice repeated rolling from back to tummy. Place toys around to encourage pivoting 2. Sensory Games and Activities • Encourage baby to touch fabric with different textures such as wool, corduroy, and velvet • Lift baby up and down and play in different positions to help develop their sense of movement and balance • Find balls with different textures and colors. Teach baby how to roll, drop, and bounce them. 3. Communication Games and Activities • Play peek-a-boo • Use a variety of facial expressions while you talk • Read with the baby. “Reading” can simply mean describing pictures without following the written words. • Encourage two-way communication. When baby coos or babbles, be sure to respond and take turns in “conversation”. • Play with rhymes and songs • Encourage baby to play with toys that make sounds 4. Feeding Games and Activities • Collect a variety of scents (flowers, spices, cookies) and pass them under baby’s nose one at a time to see what kinds of smells they prefer Content Source  

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Most Recommended Games for 7-12 Month Old Babies

Once your baby is 6 months old, he/she would have already mastered various skills and you can further enhance his/her development by playing the following games with your child. 7-9 Month Old Games 1. Motor Games and Activities • Put a toy or book inside an empty cardboard box. Wrap it with colorful paper or newspaper comics. Clap your hands when baby yanks it opens then announce what is inside. • Encourage movement by placing toys around the baby where they must move to reach them • Encourage baby push-ups during Tummy Time by raising and lowering a rattle over baby’s head • Engage baby in activities like reading or playing with a ball while in sitting • Gently push the baby back and forth on a swing in the park, but make sure the baby can sit up and hold the head steady with no problem • When the baby is holding a toy in each hand offer the third toy; watch as baby figures out how to grasp the new toy without letting go of the other two • Punch holes in the lid of empty food container and fill with water to make a fun bath time toy • Get an empty plastic bucket and let baby throw toys into it • Use different household items, like squeeze toys or newspapers to make different noises for baby 2. Sensory Games and Activities • Use your hands to make shadow puppets for baby • Gently touch baby on the feet and tummy to make them giggle • Play with a jack in the box or windup toy with the baby to show motion • Use animal sounds when playing with or reading to the baby; point out an image of an animal then associate the sound that animal makes with the picture • Walk with baby in a carrier or baby backpack • Play with baby in many different positions • Take baby on a walk in a stroller or jogger • Use slow, rocking motions for calming and more vigorous motions for play time • Give baby space to explore the environment, while staying close to supervise • Introduce new textures while the baby is eating, sleeping, dressing, or playing outdoors, use a variety of sponges, soaps, and lotions during bath time • Provide plenty of skin-to-skin contact with a parent or caregiver • Encourage baby to play on the floor with toys of various colors, sizes, and shapes • Allow baby to grab and explore items within reach 3. Communication Games and Activities • Draw a picture of the baby’s face and then point out the different parts • Play with a pretend phone; talk into the phone as you would a regular call, then offer it to baby to do the same • Read short stories with baby • Start using hand movements along with associated words to teach baby to communicate with gestures • Describe your actions throughout the day as you dress, feed, and bathe the baby. This gives the baby an opportunity to listen to the sounds and rhythms of speech • Respond to baby’s sounds and encourage two-way communication • Play music throughout the day – lively, upbeat music during playtime, and quiet melodic music for naps and bedtime • Read picture books together to help baby connect words and images • Give baby frequent face time • Point out objects while you walk and talk with baby 4. Feeding Games and Activities • Try introducing pureed foods to baby. Puree a small amount of whatever you are having for dinner in a food processor, but be sure to avoid honey, cow’s milk, salt, and artificial sweeteners • Introduce new foods gradually and watch for baby’s response • Do not force food or show stress over a baby’s dislike for certain foods • Change the texture of food if baby refuses food • Provide baby with a healthy diet – avoid artificial ingredients, sugars, and preservatives 10-12 Month Old Games 1. Motor Games and Activities • Get baby to stack toys such as blocks or rings and describe each toy as your baby picks it up • Lie down on the floor and have baby crawl over you • Practice new gestures with the baby like blowing kisses, clapping hands, or giving a high five • Use a toy to encourage baby to crawl when they are in a tummy time position • Roll a softball across the floor and encourage baby to crawl after it • Allow baby to play with toys they can push or pull across the floor • Read with the baby while they lie on their tummy • Play with stackable blocks • Let baby play with large objects like tunnels, pillows, or cushions while supervised • If the baby is already walking, let them try riding toys that they can sit on and scoot across the floor • Provide push toys that allow baby to practice walking with some support • Encourage baby to dance and sway to the music • Provide opportunities for baby to experience slow, rocking movements 2. Sensory Games and Activities • Play peek-a-boo with baby • Have baby look at their reflection in the mirror and point out each body part • Encourage baby to crawl over, under, and through various objects in your home • Introduce baby to new textures through food, toys, clothes, sponges, etc. • Provide plenty of skin-to-skin contact with caregivers • Keep baby away from areas where people are smoking or using harsh chemicals 3. Communication Games and Activities • Practice waving bye-bye when a guest leaves your home • Read daily from big, colorful books and let baby turn the pages • Encourage baby to wave hello when meeting new people • Ask baby to point to different body parts when you name them • Ask baby questions and encourage response with words, baby sounds, cooing, or babbling. Record the conversation and play it back for baby to hear • Direct baby’s attention to interesting objects by helping them point their finger • Name textures, shapes, and sizes to help baby attach words to tactile experiences • Describe your actions throughout the day as you dress, feed, and bathe the baby • Respond to baby’s sounds to encourage two-way communication 4. Feeding Games and Activities • Offer baby an assortment of food to try • Keep track of where the baby is in their feeding development, well-meaning friends and family may give baby food inappropriate for their age Content Source

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