Postnatal Care

Postnatal care is the care given to the mother and her newborn baby immediately after the birth and for the first six weeks of life

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Exercise for Post Natal Health and Wellbeing

8 tips for losing weight after pregnancy

Don't diet. It may sound strange, but going on an official "diet" could derail your post-pregnancy weight loss goals. Feeling deprived of your favorite foods while you're already stressed out by your new role as mom could actually cause you to gain weight, Johnson says. "If you go back to eating healthy and eating for your hunger, most women find that the weight comes off pretty naturally," she says. Instead of dieting, she recommends eating a well-balanced variety of foods. Keep different snacks in the house to keep you from feeling hungry and give you energy throughout the day. Apple slices, carrot sticks, and wheat crackers are all good for noshing. No matter how much you want to lose weight, try not to dip below 1,800 calories a day, particularly if you are breastfeeding. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid site can help you design a personalized eating plan based on your age, activity level, and weight loss goals. The site even has a special section for breastfeeding moms. Load up on "super foods." When you're a new mother, your body needs maximum nutrition, especially if you're nursing. Choose foods that are heavy in the nutrients you need and light in calories and fat. Fish is one of these "super foods" because it's packed with DHA, an essential omega-3 fatty acid that helps your newborn develop a healthy brain and nervous system. The best sources of DHA are cold-water fish such as salmon, sardines, and tuna (stick to canned light tuna because albacore tends to be high in mercury). Milk and yogurt are also super foods because they're high in the calcium you need to keep your bones strong. And don't forget the protein. Lean meat, chicken, and beans are low in fat and high in protein and fiber. They're good for you, and they'll keep you feeling full for longer.   Breastfeed. Whether breastfeeding can actually help you lose weight is still up in the air -- some studies find that breastfeeding exclusively can help you return to your pre-baby weight faster, while others find no difference in weight loss between women who breastfeed and those who bottle feed. What is for sure is that breastfeeding is good for your baby, boosting immunity and providing a number of other important health benefits. And nursing exclusively lets you add about an extra 300 calories a day to your diet (you can add slightly more calories if you have a really big eater or twins). Just make sure that if you do breastfeed, you don't use it as an excuse to eat whatever you want. Drink up. Drinking plenty of water throughout the day prevents you from getting dehydrated. It also fills you up so that you don't eat as much, and some research has found that it may speed up your metabolism. Whether you need the often-recommended eight glasses a day isn't certain, so Johnson recommends using the color of your urine and how often you need to go to the bathroom as guides. If you're drinking enough fluids, your urine should be relatively clear, and you should be going to the bathroom about every three to four hours. Move it! Diet is important, but it's only one part of your post-pregnancy weight loss plan. You also need to incorporate aerobic and strength training exercises after pregnancy to burn calories and keep your muscles and bones strong. "Exercise, beyond helping you lose weight, provides so many benefits to a new mom," Johnson says. "It helps with depression, it helps with the sleep issue ... it helps in relieving stress -- and having a new baby in the house can definitely be stressful." Get some sleep. It may seem impossible to get a full eight hours of sleep when you have a baby summoning you like clockwork throughout the night, but being sleep deprived could make it harder for you to shed the baby weight. In one study, new moms who slept five hours or less a night were more likely to hold onto their extra pregnancy weight than women who slept seven hours. When you're tired, your body releases cortisol and other stress hormones that can promote weight gain. "Also when you're exhausted, you don't feel like taking good care of yourself," Johnson says. "You're less likely to choose healthy food. You're more likely to grab something through a drive-through. You're also less likely to get physical activity." Ask for help. If you're struggling to lose the weight, enlist the help of your doctor and a dietitian. The dietitian can help you design an eating plan that will let you lose weight safely and effectively, while the doctor can guide you on how much weight you need to lose and when you can start exercising.  

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Postpartum Perineum Care

What to get when you are Expecting

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Essential items to pack in your hospital bag

Your delivery is just round the corner and you are so stressed that you keep forgetting what to keep for the D-Day. So here's a quick check list for you to organize yourself and enjoy your less chaotic days. Smartphone and Charger It's true that today you just can't be without your phone. Since you may be messaging, calling or replying a lot, before and after the delivery, keep your chargers handy, too.  Important Documents A picture ID, health insurance information, and hospital registration forms. Even if you've already registered at the hospital, some hospitals need to confirm your records before they can admit you. Toiletries Deodorant, body wash, shampoo, facial cleansing wipes, toothpaste, and a toothbrush are necessities. Don’t forget the lip balm and moisturizer – hospitals rooms may make your skin dry, so keep all your personal stuff ready. Hair Care Products Head bands, shampoo, conditoner, dry shampoo, oil, and hair brush. Cash and Change Hospital food for your partner and tips to the staff at the end of your stay will make you run out of change. So stuff your wallets.Homecoming Outfit for Baby Pack a newborn-size kimono-style shirt, with footed pants so you don't have to bring socks. You'll likely get a receiving blanket and hat in the hospital, so skip those unless you've got your heart set on a specific style. Extra Outfit for You Here's a hint: You'll probably still look about 5 months pregnant, so skip your non-maternity skinnies and pack your favorite maternity dress or leggings and a tunic. (Trust us: Not fitting into your going-home outfit is a bummer!) Sleepwear and Underwear A cotton nightie will be much more comfortable than a hospital gown, and a robe will come in handy for walking the hallways. Several pairs of undies are also a must for any hospital bag checklist (briefs, maternity, or disposables like Depends) if you don't want to wear the mesh underwear the hospital gives you after delivery.Flip-Flops Bring flip-flops for the shower or to wear home if your feet are swollen. Slippers and/or Heavy Socks Keep your toes toasty and clean, whether you're in bed or strolling around on the cold tile floor. Bring a pair that's easily laundered, as they may get a bit dirty. Extra Undies and Extra-Absorbent Pads You're going to need these after delivery. It might also be helpful to pack lidocaine spray or witch hazel pads (to relieve pain from tearing). Nursing Bra Bring a nursing tank or bra that's comfortable enough to sleep in.  Music, Movies, and Magazines, Books. Load up your smartphone or tablet with tunes and anything you might want to binge-watch on Netflix. It'll help district you—and your partner—during a long labor. An Extra Bag or Two With all the goodies from the hospital—diapers, blankets, and creams—and all the gifts from well wishers, you're bound to have more stuff coming out than you did going in. For the Baby: Most of the things will be provided by the hospital and you will be charged for those anyway, but you could keep these. A set of clothes to take baby back home in A few sets of clothes/onesies/tops for baby to change into while in the hospital Caps  A blanket for the crib A blanket to carry baby back home in Diapers  Wipes

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Super Boss: Four Women On Juggling Motherhood And Work

Seema Patel, 36, mother of two Seema Patel, a lawyer and deputy director of San Francisco’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement, was taking her first steps at a government job in Washington DC a few years ago when her then-boss sat her down with an unexpected piece of advice. “I don’t know anything about you,” her boss said. “But if you have any plans to have a family in the future, start saving your leave right now.” Patel’s employer was the federal government, and she didn’t get a day of paid maternity leave as part of her work arrangement. Get Society Weekly: our newsletter for public service professionals  Back then, Patel was unmarried and very career-focused, and a family was the last thing on her mind. But diligently, she took her boss’s word for it. She avoided using her sick days over the course of four years so that when she eventually did have her first child two years ago, she had accumulated enough to get three months paid time off. When she had her second baby six months ago, Patel could not pull the same trick. The four months she took off were entirely unpaid. Patel says she experienced no pushback from colleagues, but it is the work structure she has an issue with. “I find it extremely unsupportive for anyone trying to have family,” she says. “It sends a message: your country does not value you becoming a parent.” Karen Choi, 41, mother of four Karen Choi, a vice-president at asset management firm Capital Group, says that any working woman who is a mother should be applauded. Choi, who has four children including a six-month-old baby, describes juggling being a mother and a job “a constant struggle”. Secrets for keeping your head above water include having an “unbelievably supportive family” as well as a nanny and babysitter, accepting that there are some areas you are not going to be the best at (“Not everyone can be the Martha of home décor”), and simply getting through it. Advertisement Choi says she took more maternity leave with every child she had, starting with two and a half months with her first child, and taking six months off with her latest. This makes her an exception, especially within her industry. “When your child is sick, has a fever, is throwing up and you are up all night taking care of your child and knowing that the next morning you have to get your other kids to school and then you have to go to work ... That’s when it gets to be very challenging”, she says. Her firm was supportive, though, and she stresses her investment portfolio’s performance did not suffer at all. When she entered the finance industry after university, about 20 or so of her female college mates chose the same path, she says. Today about 90% of them have left. Women who exit jobs and then re-enter are likely to no longer be on track for peak earning positions, she says. Staying is tough: “A sacrifice in the short term, but it pays in the long term.” If nothing else, her children have helped provide meaning for this sacrifice, she says, because all four of her children are daughters. “One of the things that keep me going is the fact that I would like to be a role model for them.” Kelly Posner, 48, mother of four The notion of being a role model to her four children is also what drives 48-year-old research scientist and professor Kelly Posner. “They know that their mom is out there literally helping to save lives.” Posner, who is the founder and director of the Center for Suicide Risk Assessment at Columbia University, says it is important for women to know that they can have a “big goal” career-wise and achieve it. “It is very important for women to believe that they can have a vision. Most women do not allow themselves to think that” she says. She once gave a presentation to 200 people, including government officials in Italy over a webinar while eight months pregnant. Technology has also helped, she says, with the ability to stop the car and take a call after picking her kids up, or to answer an email on the go. Juggling motherhood with a demanding career has been helped by an optimistic, problem-solving disposition, she says – an ability to get through things even when they feel impossible. Jennifer Epps-Addison, 33, mother of two Jennifer Epps-Addison, 33, the executive director of Wisconsin Jobs Now and a mother of two, says that only being able to make career and motherhood work together thanks to private networks of help – like nannies – is wrong. “You shouldn’t have to get lucky or win the lottery to be able to succeed,” she says, describing the systemic failure to support women and families – citing oppressively low wages, a flawed health care system and a lack of mandated paid maternity leave. “As a society, we are not taking care of each other,” she says. “We cannot even guarantee mothers who have just birthed a child to recuperate.” Epps-Addison, who was pregnant while attending law school, gave birth to one of her children while she was on a fellowship. With a husband and offspring relying on the healthcare provided by the fellowship, the labor leader was only able to take two weeks' maternity leave, she says, before returning to work. Content Source

Transitioning back to work after the baby: Tips for working moms

Top Seven Tips for Moms Returning to Work (outside the home): 1) If at all possible, return to work on a Thursday (if you work full time) so that you have a short work week initially. Then you have the weekend to review how to make necessary adjustments for the following week. And you enter the new week knowing you can do this! It is empowering to get through the first week, even if it is a short one. 2) If pumping, find out ahead of time where you can have privacy. Is there a lactation room at your work? Or an office with a lock on it? You don’t want someone barging in on you while in a vulnerable position. If you try pumping, and you find you just don’t have the energy to continue, perhaps partial supplementation with a formula for your baby will be just fine. Then you can breast-feed when you are with your baby at night and on weekends.  3) Bring snacks and water. It is so important to stay hydrated and keep blood sugar even. It’s easy to forget to eat or drink water when multi-tasking. Remember that proper nutrition, including continuing with prenatal vitamins (if breastfeeding and doctor recommends), is essential to good mood health. Bring high-protein snacks (like almonds and string cheese) to graze on throughout the day and before/after lunch. What is good for your body is good for your mental state. 4) Allow yourself to cry. You will miss your baby. A lot. Initially, it will be very tough. Bring Kleenex. Give yourself the time and space to let the tears flow in the company of supportive people who understand your transition. Then distract yourself with tasks at hand to ground yourself back in the present. Reward yourself with some nice adult conversation and a cup of delicious coffee or herbal tea. Savor being able to enjoy a chat with your colleagues uninterrupted by baby’s needs. 5) It may be helpful to bring a transitional object that reminds you of your connection with your baby, like a picture of the baby, or a little bootie with his/her scent. Some women laugh that they have a “baby shrine” of baby photos at their desks so that they feel connected to their little one while away. Leave a photo of you with the baby and an item with your scent on it (a robe or article of clothing). You stay connected through your senses that way throughout the day. 6) Align yourself with other working moms. They are invaluable as support when you are having a tough day balancing it all. These mammas are doing what you are doing and more than likely have some emotional support and tricks up the sleeve that has helped them weather the storm of transitioning back to work.  Don’t reinvent the wheel. Go to the seasoned mammas for support and guidance. 7) If at all possible, work for a family-friendly company. All moms/families deserve to have the flexibility they need to make work/family life balance possible. Sadly, not all employers embrace this philosophy. Some employers also have generous family leave policies. Check Working Mother magazine for the top employers who are “family-friendly.” I especially love companies that have on-site daycare. Content Source    

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Work after baby: Making the successful transition

The decision to go back to work after spending some quality time with the newborn can be emotionally draining for a new mom. Most of the moms find it tough to resume their work and stay away from their babies for several hours. Becoming a working mother can cause several conflicting feelings in the mind: Guilt that you are leaving your baby in charge of a caretaker. Relief that you are making your baby learn to live away from you. Guilt that you are feeling relieved to be away from your newborn. Missing the baby at the workplace. These contradictory emotions are totally normal and expected from a new mother. Given below are some of the tips that will help you ease those back-work-jitters and make the transition successful. Have a backup childcare plan: If your baby gets sick (and she will) or your childcare facility is closed for a day or your babysitter is stuck in traffic, be prepared with alternative arrangements so you're not scrambling at the last minute. Manage your time well: You've got a pretty compelling reason to get your work done as your baby is waiting for you at home. Time management at work is very important for a successful career. Ask for support: This is a tough time, so lean on your spouse, friends, family, other working moms, and anyone else who's willing to help you make this transition. Don't forget about you: If you're completely exhausted and emotionally depleted, you won't do either of your "jobs" effectively. Try to get as much rest as possible, do some exercise for a healthy mind and body. Bring a little bit of baby to work: Arrange a couple of cute photos on your desk or in your workspace or locker. You can also create a virtual gallery. You may use your photos to create a slide show starring your little one on your computer screen. It's easy to do and easy to update as your baby grows. Call home for your "coo" fix: There's nothing like hearing the sound of your baby's gurgles to feel connected (hearing him crying is another matter altogether). It's fine to ring up your caregiver once or twice a day. Just don't get crazy and check in every hour. Try to time your calls so your baby is alert and happy. Content source Featured image source

Being a working parent: Tips to manage home and office, efficiently!

Going back to work after your maternity leave is a big change for you, your family, and especially your baby. Find childcare that fits your working hours. You can choose from a range of childcare options like daycare centers, part-time maids, nannies or live-in maids. It is best to have a trusted family member to look after when your baby is with the maid. Consider finances What’s best for you financially may also play a big part in your decision. Going to work may mean that you will have to pay for childcare for your baby. Childcare can be expensive and you may have to take into account other expenses such as keeping an additional maid for the cleaning or cooking. Covering all these costs may make you feel that staying at home with your baby is a better option. However, perhaps you don’t want too long a break in your career, even if you don’t save that much after bearing childcare costs. Or if it isn’t about the money, you may like to start off with flexible working, if it is an option. This may help you plan your work around your baby’s routine. In the end, it is important to be happy with what you choose. Your child will benefit much more from a content mum than one who is unhappy. How can I work at home? To tackle most work at home jobs you'll almost certainly need some regular childcare. So decide what time of day you would like to work, then organize childcare to fit in. For example, if your brain is sharpest in the mornings, book childcare for those hours. Then you have a set period of the day to get everything done. Set up your workspace, too. If your child makes a fuss when you see her at the end of the day or at weekends, try to be patient and don't blame yourself. Chances are she's just missed you and wants some hugs and attention. Content Source Featured Image Source

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Slow weight gain in breastfed babies

Most breastfed babies will get enough breast milk and gain weight in a consistent and expected pattern as long as they latch on well and breastfeed often. But, what if you think your child isn't getting what he needs to grow and thrive? If you're breastfeeding and your newborn is gaining weight slowly or inconsistently then he may not be getting enough breast milk. So, here's what to look for and what to do if you think your child isn't gaining weight well. Breastfeeding and Slow Weight Gain Breastfed newborns can lose up to 10 percent of their birth weight during the first week. Then, by the time a child is two weeks old, he should regain the weight that was lost. After that, for the next three months or so, breastfed babies gain about 28 gram per day. Of course, every newborn is different, and some children just normally grow more slowly than others. So, as long as your baby is breastfeeding well and his health care exams are on target, a slower weight gain may not be an issue. When Slow Weight Gain Is a Problem Weight gain is the best sign that a child is getting enough breast milk. When a baby is gaining weight slower than expected, it could mean that she's not getting enough. So, if your newborn is not back to her birth weight in two weeks, or she's not gaining weight consistently after that, it may be that there's a breastfeeding issue that's preventing your child from getting enough breast milk. The Reasons Your Baby May Not Be Gaining Weight as Expected Your newborn is not latching on well: A good latch allows your child to remove the breast milk from your breast without getting tired out and frustrated. If your baby is not latching on correctly, or latching on to just your nipple, she won't be able to remove the breast milk very well. Your baby isn't breastfeeding often enough: Breastfeed your newborn at least every two to three hours through the day and night for the first six to eight weeks. If he wants to breastfeed more often, put him back to the breast. Your child is not breastfeeding long enough at each feeding: Newborns should breastfeed for about 8 to 10 minutes on each side. As your child gets older, she won't need to breastfeed as long to get the breast milk she needs, but during the first few weeks, try to keep her awake and actively sucking for as long as you can. Your little one is in pain: If your baby is not comfortable because of a birth injury or an infection such as thrush in her mouth, she may not breastfeed well, and therefore she may be gaining weight slowly. You have a low breast milk supply: A low milk supply can prevent your child from getting enough breast milk, but it could also be the result of your baby not breastfeeding well. It's a bit of a vicious cycle. The good news is that a typical low milk supply can often be recovered pretty easily.   Content source Featured image source

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Baby sleep facts and myths every parent should know

  During the first few weeks, newborn babies are asleep more than they are awake. A baby’s sleep needs are, on average, between 16 and 22 hours per 24-hour period. It varies a lot among babies, but it can also vary from day to day for the same baby. As a new parent, you might think that you’ve found a routine at the beginning. But it’s common that this changes frequently. The duration of your baby’s sleep periods can also change. On some days their waking and sleeping times are longer, and on other days your baby might sleep more but for shorter periods of time. Here are some facts related to baby's sleep: NEWBORN SLEEP PERIODS ARE SHORT A newborn baby usually sleeps around 18-20 hours a day. This sounds like a comfortable existence for new parents, doesn’t it? But then why do many new parents experience such a lack of sleep in the early days? It probably has to do with the duration of the sleep periods. A newborn sleeps for a while, is awake for a while and then falls asleep again. And it can be this way around the clock during the first few weeks. Eventually the baby will adapt to ‘our’ circadian rhythm, remaining awake for longer periods of time during the day and sleeping for several hours at night Just as with adults, a baby’s sleep is made up of different cycles of deep and light sleep. “A newborn does not sleep deeply all the time, but instead switches between sleeping deeply, being drowsy and sleeping lightly. In between, the baby is either awake and lively, alert and cranky, or screaming and crying.” FEELINGS OF HUNGER AND BEING FULL CONTROL HOW A NEWBORN SLEEP. In the first few weeks, food and sleep dominate the newborn’s world. Eating takes a lot of energy, making your baby tired and so making them fall asleep. And when they wake up again, hunger is often the cause. Newborn babies sleep according to their own internal clock and fall asleep when they need to. A change usually takes place around 4-7 weeks, when your baby begins to become curious about its surroundings and may sometimes need to be soothed to fall asleep. NEWBORNS FOLLOW THEIR SLEEP RHYTHM FROM THE WOMB So much of everything that happens when a baby is born is cleverly designed by nature. But the fact that newborn babies have a different circadian rhythm than their parents is less ingenious. No one is really sure why. Newborns tend to stick with the sleep pattern they had in the womb, sometimes a week after birth, sometimes up to several months. Almost all babies in the womb are more awake and active during the late evening and night, and sleep soundly during early morning and morning Naturally, this poses a challenge for many new parents. “Of course, it feels frustrating when your baby is awake when you want to sleep. But be patient when it comes to sleep – your baby will gradually begin to sleep longer through the night. A one-year-old will definitely have outgrown their newborn sleep cycle. There’s no user manual to follow when it comes to newborn sleep. But she’s happy to share some good pieces of advice and tips for new parents. Getting constant advice from your parents, in-laws, and friends about your baby’s sleep cycle? For new parents, one of the hardest things to do is understand how to manage to get some rest while making sure that the baby is resting enough too. You are probably overwhelmed at the thought that you are not going to get any shuteye once the baby arrives. What you need is the right information about good sleep and your baby. In fact, there are several myths about sleeping babies that you need to know about to ensure that your baby gets all the rest that he needs in these growing years. Myth 1: You get to decide when your baby sleeps and for how long. Newborn babies spend most of their time sleeping. That said, they will only sleep when their body is ready. Their waking up depends entirely on cues such as hunger or wetness of the diaper. Instead of creating a schedule, it is best that you follow your baby’s cues to ensure that he is well rested. Myth 2: Babies can be allowed to sleep on the side Sleeping on the back is not safe for babies as it can lead to them rolling over onto their stomach. This increases the risk of issues like Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. In fact, a campaign called “Back to Sleep” was initiated to urge parents to put babies to sleep on their back for safer and sounder sleep. Myth 3: Swaddling does not help put the baby to sleep Swaddling is one of the best and most tested techniques to get your baby to sleep. This is exceptionally calming for the baby. The only issue is that a tight wrap around the baby can lead to overheating. In addition to that, knowing the right position to swaddle the baby also makes all the difference. Learning this from your pediatrician can be very useful in helping your baby fall asleep faster. This is indeed not an outdated method as most people may suggest. Myth 4: If your baby sleeps in the car or during a stroll, it does not count. What matters is that your baby should have a sound sleep. This can even be away from his crib, and he will still get as much rest as he needs. If you notice that your baby has fallen asleep in an area outside the crib, you need to put him back in. Allow the baby to wake up on his own before you change his place of sleep. Myth 5: Babies sleep better when you add some rice cereal to their feeding bottle. This method is not proven to have any effect on the sleep cycle of children. In fact, it can also be quite risky to give your baby rice cereal when they are too young. Babies are unable to digest it until they are at least four months old.   Content source Featured image source

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Baby feeding and sleeping schedule: Breastfeeding 4 to 6-month-old

A newborn’s sleep schedules take time to set and therefore it is very tough to get into a consistent routine before 4 months of age. Bedtimes can also be quite inconsistent and erratic in the first 3 months. Now that your baby is 4 months old, this is the perfect time to get your baby into a routine as they naturally settle into a 4-5 nap schedule. Here is your 4 month old breastfeeding schedule: 8am – Wake Up & Nurse 9:30am – Nap 11am – Nurse 12:00pm – Nap 2pm – Nurse 3pm – Nap 5pm – Nurse 6pm – Nap 8pm – Nurse / Bottle (We do a pumped bottle from 8pm onward) 8:30pm – 9pm Bed *Sometimes there is a middle of the night feed around 5am. It is common for baby to still get up 1-2x per night after the first 5-8 hour stretch at this age. Note: If your baby wakes up earlier, adjust the times above accordingly. For example, if your baby wakes up at 7am, then bedtime should be around 7:30-8pm. How many naps for a 4 month old? As you can see your 4 month old is napping 4 times a day now. This schedule has naturally emerged from following a 1.5-2 hour wake time in between naps and trying to do an “Eat, Activity, Sleep” schedule. The crucial point here is that you want to feed your baby AFTER they are awake. This way they are not associating nursing with going to sleep and will likely sleep better at night. This isn’t always possible to do this based on your baby’s nap schedule. Some days the schedule may get thrown off and you may have to nurse right before your baby goes to sleep. And that’s OK! Just try to implement it as often as you can. Naps at this age are typically 45 mins to an hour. Babies at this age haven’t yet learned to connect their sleep cycles so it’s common to have a nap that is just one sleep cycle. 4 month old babies usually nap 4-5 times a day. The key is that you’re wanting your baby to get 15-16 total hours of sleep a day (including naps & night time). How often to nurse a 4 month old? As far as nursing during the day is concerned, you may follow approximately 3 hours intervals in between nursing schedules. You may also nurse on demand and therefore if your baby gets hungry before 3 hours you may feed her. But, it will be ideal also to keep the 3 hours interval in mind. 4 Month Old Breastfeeding Schedule You don’t need to stick to a schedule to the T. Every day will be different and you can adapt and change it as you need to. The key elements of a schedule for a 4 month old is knowing that they will likely need at least 4 naps in the day. Carve out the approximate times for when those naps will be (morning, noon, early afternoon, late afternoon) and plan your day around that.   Content source Featured image source          

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