Periods

A period, or menstruation, is the shedding of the lining of the womb.

Ask anything about periods

Hello mommies kese ho aap sb. Mujhe puchna tha ki Meri 3rd july ko normal delivery hui thi or bleeding 31st july ko stop hui thi uske baad abi tk periods start nhi huye aana. Is it normal or not?

Kya koi 7month mein abortion krwa skta Kya...unke already 2 c-section ho chuke hai..ye third pregnancy hai...unke 4th month tak kuch pta ni chala...ab they don't want to concieve...7month mein abortion ho skta kya jinke already 2 baar c-section se baby hua ho .or ye third pregency hai

share the experience after c sec sab ko bleeding kab tak band ho gai thi kya 40 days ati rehay ya jaldi band ho gai

 11 Possible Causes of a Delayed Period

The first thought that crosses a woman’s mind when her periods get delayed is an unplanned pregnancy. While it might be the actual cause of a delayed or missed period, there are various other reasons why your periods can get delayed: Stress - Everyone experiences a little bit of stress but too much of it can affect your menstrual cycles adversely. It can delay the cycle, prolong it and even make it shorter. Birth control - Often, the birth control pills taken by women alter their hormonal balance and can even lead to a delay in the menstrual cycle. This includes all forms of birth control, i.e pills, rings, implants, shots, and patches. Perimenopause - The onset of menopause may also lead to a delay in periods. Most women experience menopause around the age of 50 but they may start experiencing its symptoms about 10-15 years before that. This is called perimenopause. Weight Loss or Weight gain - Significant gain or loss of weight is another factor that can throw your menstrual cycle out of balance. Excessive exercise - Excessive exercise can lower the levels of estrogen in your body and delay your periods. PCOD - This is one of the most common hormonal problems that can play havoc with your menstrual cycle. Hormonal Imbalances - Certain hormonal problems such as thyroid can make a woman miss her period. Failed contraception - Another very common cause of a delayed period can be failed contraception, which means you have an unwanted pregnancy. Breastfeeding- Most breastfeeding mothers may notice that their period doesn’t make an appearance at all or is delayed. This is due to some change in the hormonal levels of the body but it doesn’t mean that you’re not ovulating.  Medication - If you’re taking certain medications, your periods might get delayed. Changes in sleep schedule - Changes and disruption in your sleep schedule can also lead to a delay in your periods. If you ever experience a delay in your periods, you must consult your doctor before jumping to any conclusion. Featured Image Source

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Difference Between Implantation Bleeding and Menstrual Cycle

1. Colour • Implantation Bleeding: The blood seen is usually pink or brown in colour. The brown colour that is sometimes observed is only on account of older blood. • Menstrual Cycle: The colour of the blood that is seen during periods can vary and is considered a biological health monitor for a woman. While a bright red colour can indicate new blood, a greyish hue may indicate an infection or miscarriage. 2. Duration • Implantation Bleeding: It does not last for long and has a maximum duration of 1-2 days. • Menstrual Cycle: It can last anywhere between 2-7 days. It is highly variable and depends on factors such as lifestyle and body type. 3. Discharge • Implantation Bleeding: The discharge is always highly viscous. • Menstrual Cycle: The discharge changes according to the ovulation cycle and is often considered an accurate indicator of a woman’s fertility. The mucus is an egg white colour and relatively watery when a woman is most fertile. On the other hand, the discharge becomes sticky and has a creamy texture when a woman is in her non-fertile stage. 4. Cramping • Implantation Bleeding: The cramps experienced are mild compared to what you go through during a period. They are caused due to hormonal activity after the implantation. • Menstrual Cycle: The cramps can range from mild to severe with each period. A hormone called prostaglandin causes muscle contractions within the uterine wall which is responsible for the cramps. 5. Volume • Implantation Bleeding: The amount of bleeding is minimal and in many cases, does not even require the changing of a pad. The volume of bleeding is also independent of any other condition. • Menstrual Cycle: The amount of bleeding is, on average, about 10-30 ml per period, though sometimes it can even cross 500ml! The flow is variable and depends on conditions such as the size of the individual, exercise, and hormonal levels. Content Source Featured Image Source

Is it implantation bleeding — Or just my period?

When you’re actively trying to get pregnant, those two weeks between ovulation and a positive home pregnancy test (or your period) can seem much longer. If you’re like most women, you’ll spend them hyper-aware of every ache, twinge, and craving your body has, wondering whether it’s an early sign of pregnancy. One of the most telltale symptoms of pregnancy is bleeding. If you do have some light spotting, does it mean anything? While it can be hard to tell, many women who go on to have healthy, normal pregnancies have what’s called implantation bleeding around the time that their embryo lodges itself into the side of the uterus. What is implantation bleeding? After ovulation and at the moment an egg is successfully fertilized by a sperm, the embryo starts dividing and growing, sending out signals to a woman’s body to prepare for pregnancy. In turn, the walls of the uterus, called the endometrium, start to change: They’ve already been thickening throughout the menstrual cycle, but they’ll need to grow and mature even more to protect and nourish an embryo for nine months. Anywhere from six to 12 days after fertilization, the quickly-growing embryo has moved down the Fallopian tubes to the uterus. It’s starting to need more nutrients, and the endometrium has filled in enough to support the embryo. At this time, the embryo attaches itself to the endometrium, where it becomes reliant on a mother’s body — for the first time — for nutrients and oxygen. Implantation bleeding happens when the embryo makes its way into the uterus, which sometimes causes little blood vessels to burst. When does implantation bleeding occur? When the embryo implants in the lining of the uterus, it can disrupt tiny blood vessels in the spot it burrows into. This won’t cause any problems (the endometrium recovers!) but some women will experience light bleeding, from pinkish or red to brown discharge. This so-called implantation bleeding will likely arrive earlier than your expected monthly flow (usually around five to 10 days after conception).  How do I know it’s implantation bleeding and not my period? Since implantation bleeding is a symptom that can often occur before you test positive on a pregnancy test, it can be hard to know whether light bleeding is an early sign of pregnancy or just normal spotting leading up to your period. And unfortunately, there’s no conclusive way to find out. The best way to know whether you’re pregnant or not is to wait a few more days and take a pregnancy test. The timing of when you last had sex might also help you figure it out: If it’s been more than two weeks, it’s unlikely that any spot you're having is implantation bleeding. That said, approximately one-third of women who report having experienced implantation bleeding often describe it as distinct from their usual premenstrual spotting — some say the blood is darker and not as red compared with normal period blood. Others have mild cramping at the same time as the spotting. But for many women, the two types of bleeding aren’t different at all. So you’re not alone if you assume that some spotting is implantation bleeding and get your period a few days later, or if you assume that implantation bleeding is normal spotting and end up being pregnant! When should I see my doctor? Light bleeding during pregnancy even at times other than implantation is often normal. Causes can include mundane things like irritation of the cervix following a pelvic exam, sex or infection of the vagina. But because sometimes bleeding following a positive pregnancy test can be a sign of ectopic pregnancy, molar pregnancy or miscarriage, you should always call your medical provider if you experience it so you can talk through any other symptoms. Don’t worry too much; chances are good that if the bleeding is light and doesn't last long, everything is fine. Content Source Featured Image Source

Signs And Symptoms Of Pregnancy Implantation

Below are some of the symptoms associated with pregnancy implantation. However, not all women experience these symptoms, and a pregnancy test is the only sure-shot way of finding out whether you are pregnant. Additionally, many of these symptoms must continue for at least a week after the ovulation cycle is over. 1. Bleeding/Spotting Implantation spotting is the most reliable indicator that implantation has taken place. Light, short bleeding without regular period cramps are a sign of implantation. However, spotting may also be a result of sexual intercourse due to increased sensitivity of the cervix. 2. Cramping The process that takes place within your body leads to implantation cramping. However, this pain can be differentiated from menstrual cramping as its intensity is lesser. One aspect to be noted is that cramping isn’t the result of the physical embedding as it is too tiny to make such an impact. The mild cramping is a result of the hormonal changes that take place within the body after implantation. 3. Soreness of the Breasts After implantation, hormones begin to send chemical messages to the body to prepare itself for pregnancy. In response, the breasts start becoming tender and swollen. You may experience some soreness because of this. 4. Increased Basal Body Temperature Basal Body Temperature (BBT) is the temperature of your body during a state of inactivity. Many women who are actively trying to get pregnant have a BBT chart to track their ovulation. The best time to take this measurement is right after waking up. When you are ovulating, the BBT increases due to the increased progesterone levels. During implantation, there is a dip in the BBT to below 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit, after which there is a dramatic rise in temperature. 5. Frequent Urination The implantation leads to a flurry of activities taking place within the body, one of which is an increase of blood flow to the pelvis. This puts stress on the bladder making you feel the need to urinate often. However, this is associated with menstrual cycles as well and is not a guarantee for implantation. 6. Food Craving or Aversion The surge in hormones could make you crave a specific food item that you don’t usually eat. Alternatively, you might feel an intense aversion to food items that you eat on a regular basis. 7. Hot Flashes This can happen due to the dynamic change in hormones that takes place during implantation. 8. Cervical Mucus There will be a marked increase in your mucus flow due to an increase in hormones that will stimulate the cervix. 9. Mood Swings You will experience rapidly changing emotions that can range from crying one minute to being elated the next minute. This is on account of the changes in your hormones. However, these are also pre-menstrual symptoms and do not guarantee implantation. Content Source Featured Image Source

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