Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

PCOS is a condition that affects a woman's hormone levels. This hormone imbalance causes them to skip menstrual periods and makes it harder for them to get pregnant.

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Helo friends....PCOD me pregnancy ho skti h kya plz btao the but tension h..2 seal ho bye h marriage ko..

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)- an overview

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder common among women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS may have infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods or excess male hormone (androgen) levels. The ovaries may develop numerous small collections of fluid (follicles) and fail to regularly release eggs. The exact cause of PCOS is unknown. Early diagnosis and treatment along with weight loss may reduce the risk of long-term complications such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of PCOS often develop around the time of the first menstrual period during puberty. Sometimes PCOS develops later, for example, in response to substantial weight gain. Signs and symptoms of PCOS vary. A diagnosis of PCOS is made when you experience at least two of these signs: Irregular periods. Infrequent, irregular or prolonged menstrual cycles are the most common sign of PCOS. For example, you might have fewer than nine periods a year, more than 35 days between periods and abnormally heavy periods. Excess androgen. Elevated levels of male hormone may result in physical signs, such as excess facial and body hair (hirsutism), and occasionally severe acne and male-pattern baldness. Polycystic ovaries. Your ovaries might be enlarged and contain follicles that surround the eggs. As a result, the ovaries might fail to function regularly. PCOS signs and symptoms are typically more severe if you're obese. When to see a doctor See your doctor if you have concerns about your menstrual periods, if you're experiencing infertility or if you have signs of excess androgen such as worsening hirsutism, acne and male-pattern baldness. Causes The exact cause of PCOS isn't known. Factors that might play a role include: Excess insulin. Insulin is the hormone produced in the pancreas that allows cells to use sugar, your body's primary energy supply. If your cells become resistant to the action of insulin, then your blood sugar levels can rise and your body might produce more insulin. Excess insulin might increase androgen production, causing difficulty with ovulation. Low-grade inflammation. This term is used to describe white blood cells' production of substances to fight infection. Research has shown that women with PCOS have a type of low-grade inflammation that stimulates polycystic ovaries to produce androgens, which can lead to heart and blood vessel problems. Heredity. Research suggests that certain genes might be linked to PCOS. Excess androgen. The ovaries produce abnormally high levels of androgen, resulting in hirsutism and acne. Complications Complications of PCOS can include: Infertility Gestational diabetes or pregnancy-induced high blood pressure Miscarriage or premature birth Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis — a severe liver inflammation caused by fat accumulation in the liver Metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that significantly increase your risk of cardiovascular disease Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes Sleep apnea Depression, anxiety and eating disorders Abnormal uterine bleeding Cancer of the uterine lining (endometrial cancer) Obesity is associated with PCOS and can worsen complications of the disorder. content source

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I am 28 yrs old woman, married for about 2.5 yrs. I suffer from hypothyroid and pcod. My weight is 60 kgs for height 5'1''. Also undergoing follicular study to conceive. However, still got period this month. How long it generally takes to get results in such cases? Thank you for help & guidance.

6years complete Ho Gaye Marriage Ko or PCOD bhi hai Es Baar Dr ne mujhe IUI ke liye kaha Maine 17 July Ko karwaya ....Today my pregnancy test is positive I am very excited Bht Dukho ke Baad ye din dekha hai But slightly pain my lower abdomen and Back and Having constipation.......

Good morning friends My Lmp was 26th June. Didn't get periods still. Did Beta hcg test, it was less than 0.10. i know its negative. Is there a Chance it cN increase?., means can i test again upt after one week. I am thinking i might be pregnant. Abdominal pain, vomit feeling, lower back pain are my symptoms. Please advice😊

How Sara Ali Khan handled PCOD and became an inspiration for many?

You must have heard about the disease Polycystic ovary syndrome also known as PCOD. Many women all over the world suffer from PCOD which is a lifestyle disease. I too suffer from this disease. PCOD can be defined as a hormonal disorder which may affect women during their reproductive years. According to reports, the disease has affected 1 in 10 women in India. If left untreated, PCOD can cause infertility and other complications. The signs and symptoms of PCOD may include irregular periods, ovarian cysts, weight gain or difficulty shedding weight, acne, dandruff, thinning of hair, excessive body hair, infertility, type 2 diabetes. Recently, I read on the Internet that popular Bollywood actress Sara Ali Khan, daughter of Saif Ali Khan and Amrita Singh, also suffered from PCOD. Sara made the stunning revelation at Karan Johar’s popular chat show ‘Koffee with Karan’. Sara confessed during the popular show that she weighed 96 kilos and suffered from PCOD. The Simba actress also told that PCOD was the biggest obstacle in her way when she decided to become an actress. Due to this disease, it became difficult for her to lose weight and she faced all sorts of problems. However, Sara successfully made a transformation and today the diva has impressed many with her healthy weight loss story. Sara made her acting debut recently with the film Kedarnath which also starred Sushant Singh Rajput. The noteworthy thing here is that if such a leading actress can divulge the entire world about this illness so can you. If you are also suffering from PCOD, there is no shame accepting it and confessing it to your near and dear ones. It will not only help in relieving your burden but also bring down your stress. In return, you will get their much-needed support and you can also seek the best cure for the disease.  

What Should one Look For In A Surrogate?

Surrogates are generally caring, generous, family-oriented women who feel very strongly about giving others the gift of family. Most are responsible, conscientious woman who are very devoted to the process of surrogacy. The majority of surrogates come from medium to low-income households. The relationship status of surrogates varies from single moms to married women, and education levels vary from GED’s to advanced degrees. What should intended parents look for in a surrogate? Clearly, the primary concern of any intended parent should be the surrogate’s general health and lifestyle and pregnancy history. That being in order, here are some things every intended parent should take into consideration:   • The support system the surrogate will have during the surrogacy (will she have the support of a partner, a parent, a roommate, her place of employment or a close friend)?   • Her responsiveness to requests from the agency, e.g. whether she has followed through with appointments, etc. (You can ask your agency about that.) • How her partner, husband and/or family feels about the surrogacy? • Whether or not she plans on dating during the surrogacy (assuming she is single). • Whether you and she agree on issues such as reductions or pregnancy terminations. • How your surrogate feels about invasive procedures such as amniocentesis, etc. • How much involvement you want in the surrogate’s life during (and after) the pregnancy/birth (e.g. phone calls, Skype, emails, appointments, through agency only, on-going relationship, etc.) • How important a surrogate’s diet is during the pregnancy and how willing she is to follow requested guidelines.   Also, don’t discount your own “Spidey Sense”. Sometimes you just get a vibe about someone, good or bad, and you should go with your instinct. What does an agency look for in a potential surrogate? As you can imagine, many factors go into deciding whether or not we should accept a potential surrogate into our program. Among the factors we consider are:   • Health history   • Criminal background check • Willingness to work with all types of families • Whether she responds to emails, calls, etc. in a timely manner • Her motivations for wanting to become a surrogate • Her level of openness about the surrogacy • Her ability to make it to her appointments (reliable car and/or form of transportation) • Her overall health, including:   o BMI   o non-smoker, drugs or alcohol o mental health o pregnancy history   • Current living situation:     o how many people she lives with and whom   o whether her environment is safe and clean o whether her home is close to medical facilities o how her partner and children feel about the surrogacy You mentioned the potential surrogate’s motivations—can you elaborate? There’s no question that compensation is a big motivator for potential surrogates. The funds often help with down-payments on a house, college education, children’s college funds and other major expenses. Additionally, surrogates tend to be women who enjoy helping others and love being pregnant. How do you screen your surrogates?   It depends how the surrogate finds or is referred to an agency, but generally the process is this:   • The agency has an initial phone conversation with the surrogate to discuss general requirements like height, weight, why she wants to become a surrogate, etc. • Assuming she meets the basic standards of surrogacy, she is then asked to fill out an application which delves deeper into her medical/personal history, etc. At this time, most agencies ask her for permission to conduct a background check for any criminal history she may have. • If everything, including the background check, looks good, a home visit to check her living situation, meet her children and partner (if applicable) and get a general overall view of her lifestyle is conducted. • It’s at that point that an agency will formally admit her into their program and start sending her profile out to intended parents for consideration. content source

Considerations for Choosing a Surrogate Mother

Whether you are a single man or woman or a couple, you may choose to use a surrogate to help bring your dreams of parenthood to reality. When you’ve decided to choose a surrogate mother to help you start a family, there are still further options to consider, like whether you’ll use traditional or gestational surrogacy. With a gestational surrogacy, the carrier becomes pregnant by means of in vitro fertilization (IVF) using the eggs of the intended mother or an egg donor. This means that the surrogate baby is not genetically related to the carrier. With a traditional surrogate, the surrogate’s egg is fertilized with sperm from the intended father or sperm donor through IVF or artificial insemination, making the carrier and the child genetically related. This form of surrogacy is less common than gestational surrogacy. Choosing a Surrogate If you do not already have a surrogate in mind, such as a friend or family member, you can contact an agency or fertility clinic who will help you find one. There are a number of important factors to consider when choosing a carrier for your surrogate baby including: The surrogate’s medical history—this should include a genetic profile (traditional surrogates only), blood tests and obstetric history. The surrogate’s lifestyle choices including their history of drinking and substance abuse. The cost of the surrogacy process—this includes surrogacy compensation, health and life insurance, legal fees, agency fees, psychological screening and monitoring, travel costs, medical expenses, and egg donation compensation and expenses (if applicable) . The legal issues—the laws on surrogacy vary from state to state, so the location of your surrogate is an important issue to consider. What kind of relationship you wish to have with the surrogate after the child is born—you may wish the surrogate to remain an integral part of your child’s life, or have the relationship complete upon delivery. When you are looking for a surrogate with whom you can entrust the first nine months of your baby’s life, you will want to find someone who will treat the pregnancy as if it were her own. If you do choose to find your surrogate through an agency, ask them about their screening process for surrogates, what they are like and why they do this to determine if the agency is able to provide you with the right surrogate for you. Ultimately, the key to making the right choice, is finding a surrogate that you can trust completely and with whom you can feel at ease. content source