Paeditrician

A medical practitioner specialising in children and their diseases

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Baby ke eyes me pani atta ahe with yellow color solid substance...aakh ane ke bad atta hai waise hi.... from birth what can I do?

Hii mere baby ko losse motion ho gya to kya kru n uski skeen bhi red red ho gyi kaise thik hoga use plz reply me

Some time in a day my baby have a running nose and some time every thing is normal. What is it?

Meri baby ki Belly button dekhio itti badi b kya karu bataon na koi jaldi yaar

Heloo mam mera baby 11 month ka ha wo kuch v nahi khate ha uska weight 6kg hai kya ye thik hai

Baby developmental milestones chart: 7 to 12 months

  Though you’ll find some specifics, like when babies sit up , “normal development” refers to these skills: Gross motor skills: using large groups of muscles, balancing, and changing position (sitting, standing, walking, etc.) Fine motor skills: using hands for smaller, more refined movements (playing, eating, etc.) Language skills: communicating via body language and understanding what others are saying Cognitive skills: more refined thinking skills, like reasoning and remembering Social skills: expressing feelings and responding to the feelings of others one in six children will have a developmental delay, but that doesn’t mean your baby will face long-term issues. Missing a few monthly milestones is not cause for panic. There are many factors that influence when infant milestones happen. In most cases, your baby just needs a little extra time. Babies born prematurely, for example, are more likely to hit each milestone counting from their due date, not their day of birth. Talk to your pediatrician if you have any concerns. 7 Month Baby Milestones In month 7, baby’s eyesight is improving, allowing for more coordination.  Transfering objects from one hand to another While your baby has explored objects by touch and mouth for months now, around month 7, baby will start transferring objects from from one hand to another, displaying spatial awareness. Improving vision Babies eye control and eye-body coordination becomes more refined. Improved depth perception allows babies to reach for toys and other objects. What’s more, babies’ color vision should be fairly strong by this age! 8 Month Baby Milestones In month 8, baby is on the move and better able to communicate with you.  Learning object permanence Their brains continue to amaze as they start to understand object permanence. This is the psychological phenomenon that helps folks understand that when something disappears from view, it doesn’t mean that it’s gone forever. (In other words, when mommy leaves the room, she will come back.) It may seem like small potatoes to grown adults, but think of the amazing intellectual leaps this takes for infants! Crawling The developmental milestone of crawling may not happen all at once or in a linear fashion—and some babies will only crawl for a short period of time. Others babies won’t crawl the way you’d expect to, crawling sideways or scooting their bottom along the floor. Crawling is very important—it not only strengthens baby’s muscles, but it also improves baby’s brain function. It’s tempting to hold baby up and try to teach them to walk—it’s such an exciting time—but a little bit of patience can really help baby. Experts saycrawling improves hand-eye coordination, plus improves comprehension, concentration, and memory.  Saying first words Your baby will be communicating now more than ever by the end of these months. She will be repeating sounds like “bababa” or, very adorably, “mamama.” (Though fair warning, mamas: Baby is likely to say Dada first.) Additionally, words start to carry meaning at this stage. You’ll find she understands simple words like, “no.” What’s more, she’ll begin to use her fingers to point, further associating movement with communication and comprehension. 9 Month Baby Milestones In month 9, baby’s brain is working hard—he/she is starting to use objects for their intended purpose.  Standing Babies should be able to stand holding on to your hands. You may even witness your baby pulling himself up. Improved dexterity Those jerky arm movements have long since disappeared. Babies are now able to wield objects more efficiently. Their improved dexterity might mean banging or shaking toys (or anything else they can get their hands on! Careful!)  This baby milestone also indicates increased cognitive function. You may notice baby beginning to use household objects for their intended purpose. For example, they may mimic drinking out of a cup (or actually do so!). This will also become apparent with pretend play, which should be just about starting. Look forward to baby pretending to talk on the phone and engaging in other imaginative play. 10 Month Baby Milestones In month 10, the fun really begins—baby understands and engages in simple games.  Cruising Baby may be walking while holding onto you or furniture. Playing interactive games By this point, babies can understand simple games (think peekaboo), find hidden objects, or take things in and out of a container. Encourage all of these behaviors! They will help develop those all important fine motor skills and every bit of playtime is also learning time. 11 Month Baby Milestones In month 11, you’ll notice baby’s flourishing personality and his/her desire to explore.  Starting to explore Baby will take all of those newfound gross motor skills like sitting, crawling, and cruising to start checking everything out. No cabinet or shelf is safe, my friends! Take steps to baby proof and make extra sure cleaning supplies, toiletries, and medicine cabinets are well off limits for baby. Better yet, work on getting any toxic junk out of your house! (See how to make natural cleaners for your home.) Developing their distinct personality Babies start to understand emotions better, reading and reacting to your emotional state. This level of communication and interaction deepens as they are able to use their bourgeoning vocabulary to state what they want and need. 12 Month Baby Milestones In month 12, baby’s brain has more than doubled in size! He/she is walking and talking.  Beginning to walk Here’s another developmental milestone you’ve been waiting for! Around 12 months, babies may begin to walk! They may still need a bit of help or support, but the pitter patter of those precious little feet are on the horizon. Improving language skills Watch out! At this stage, children should start repeating the words you say. They should already have a small vocabulary, and they will be practicing simple gestures like waving bye or shaking their head yes and no. Baby Milestones Chart Month   Milestones Month 1: Baby is getting acquainted with the outside world.     • Reacting to sights and sounds • Displaying reflexes Month 2: Baby’s development centers around his relationship with you and other caregivers.    • Paying attention to faces and recognizing people • Cooing • Smiling • Supporting their own head Month 3: Baby’s working on her coordination.    • Connecting sound, sight, and movement • Grasping objects Month 4: Baby’s cognitive, social, and motor skills start to develop at a rapid pace.     • Copying sounds, movements, and facial expressions • Rolling over • Babbling • Laughing Month 5: Baby’s becoming more expressive and preparing for crawling, pulling himself up, and walking.    • Smiling at the mirror • Expressing new emotions • Refining basic movements Month 6: Baby’s narrowing in on his communication and motor skills.    • Responding to their own name • Moving… a lot • Sitting Month 7: Baby’s eyesight is improving, allowing for more coordination.    • Transfering objects from one hand to another • Improving vision Month 8: Baby is on the move and better able to communicate with you.     • Learning object permanence • Crawling • Saying first words Month 9: Baby’s brain is working hard—he/she is starting to use objects for their intended purpose.     • Standing • Improved dexterity Month 10: The fun really begins—baby understands and engages in simple games.    • Cruising • Playing interactive games Month 11: You’ll notice baby’s flourishing personality and his/her desire to explore.     • Starting to explore • Developing their distinct personality Month 12: Baby’s brain has more than doubled in size! He/she is walking and talking.     • Beginning to walk • Improving language skills What to Do If Your Baby Isn’t Meeting Milestones All of baby’s firsts are important, but missing a few monthly milestones is usually not cause for panic. Your baby’s doctor will be watching for baby’s developmental milestones during each well child visit. If there’s any concern, the pediatrician may recommend a developmental assessment test to determine if any treatment or intervention is needed. If your doctor gives the all clear, but you still have concerns, get a second opinion. Remember: You know your child’s movements and patterns best. Even if it is just a nagging feeling, never be afraid to talk to your healthcare provider about any concerns. content source

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Colic: Lifestyle and home remedies

Colic is a very common problem in babies but the good news is that it goes away by the time your baby is 4 months old. Until then, try these tips. They may give both of you some relief. Help him swallow less air. Try a special bottle designed to reduce gas or a nipple with a smaller hole. Sit him up while he eats so he swallows less air. Remember to burp him during and after feedings. Bright lights and sounds can overwhelm a colicky baby. Your baby may calm down if you: Lay him on his back in a dark, quiet room. Swaddle him snugly in a blanket. Lay him across your lap and gently rub his back. Try infant massage. Put a warm water bottle on your baby's belly. Have him suck on a pacifier. Soak him in a warm bath. You may have heard that some home remedies can relieve colic. Most aren’t proven and they could hurt your baby. Always talk with your child’s pediatrician before trying something new. These are things you may have heard about. Rice cereal in a bottle. This is a definite no-no. It's a big choking hazard, and it is not proven to work. Herbal remedies such as chamomile, or gripe water. It’s best not to use these. The FDA doesn’t regulate over-the-counter remedies. You can’t be sure what they are made of, and ingredients aren’t always labeled. Some can have things in them that are very bad for your baby, like alcohol or opiates. Babies can also have allergic reactions to them. They’re also not proven to work. Simethicone gas drops. These can be OK to try. But will they work? They may or may not help.

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Safety tips for preparing baby food

Many parents are discovering that homemade baby foods can be a nutritious and often more economical alternative to baby foods available in stores. To ensure that the food is prepared safely for your growing infant, follow these simple steps for selecting, preparing, and serving food. Selecting Ingredients Always begin with good quality ingredients. It’s best to use fresh food whenever possible, but you can also use frozen or canned foods. If you’re using processed fruits and vegetables, try to find products without added sugar, especially canned fruit packed in syrup. Never feed these products to your baby or use them in homemade baby food: Dairy products made from raw, unpasteurized milk (may contain bacteria that can cause serious illnesses) Honey (puts your baby at high risk for botulism, a very dangerous illness) Home-canned food (may contain harmful bacteria if it was canned improperly) Outdated canned food Food from dented, rusted, bulging, or leaking cans or jars Food from cans or jars without labels Preparing Baby Food Since infants are at a higher risk of getting a foodborne illness than older children or healthy adults, it’s particularly important to follow these guidelines carefully: Wash your hands and any equipment used to prepare their food. Use separate cutting boards for meat, poultry and fish and for non-meat foods to avoid cross-contamination. Wash fresh fruits and vegetables thoroughly under clean, running water. Even if you plan to peel a fruit or vegetable, such as cantaloupe or squash, be sure to wash it first. Store raw meats, poultry, fish, and dairy products in the coldest part of the refrigerator immediately after purchase. Cook meat, poultry, and fish thoroughly to kill any bacteria that might be present. Be sure to use a meat thermometer and cook all meats to an internal temperature of at least 160 ºF, fish to at least 145 ºF, and all white meat poultry to an internal temperature of at least 165 ºF. Check the Minimum Cooking Temperatures chart to be sure. Content source  Featured image source

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4 Vitamin supplements you must give your baby

Are you confused which vitamin supplement you should give your baby? You will be surprised to find that most healthy babies receive the vitamins they require from breast milk or formula. As your baby begins eating solid foods, provide a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and protein-dense foods. Some babies do need additional supplementation of certain vitamins. For example, premature infants – born weighing less than 1.5 kilograms – will likely need extra vitamins and minerals added directly to breastmilk or formula. Additionally, babies who are exclusively as well as partially breastfed should be given vitamin D starting at birth, and an iron supplement starting at age 4-6 months. The most common supplements recommended for babies include: 1. Vitamin K: All babies must receive a one-time vitamin K injection shortly after birth to reduce the risk of haemorrhagic disease. Vitamin K is necessary for our bodies to activate certain molecules that help the blood to clot. 2. Vitamin D: Vitamin D allows the body to absorb and retain calcium and phosphorus, both critical for building strong bones. A vitamin D deficiency can lead to rickets, a bone-softening disease that still impacts children usually in the first two years of life. Since breast milk does not provide adequate vitamin D, all breastfed babies should receive a supplement. Formula fed babies generally do not need additional vitamin D supplementation because formula has vitamin D already added. 3. Vitamin B12: Vitamin B12 keeps the body’s nerve and blood cells healthy and helps make DNA, the genetic material in all cells. Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause a type of anaemia called megaloblastic anaemia that makes people tired and weak. Vitamin B12 is not present in plant foods, so breastfeeding moms who follow a strict vegan diet (meaning, they aren’t eating any animal foods) will need to supplement their diet with vitamin B12 to make sure that both they themselves and their babies are receiving adequate levels. 4. Iron: Breast milk is low in Iron but most babies are born with sufficient reserves of iron to protect them from anaemia, at least until the age of 4-6 months. If you had poorly controlled gestational diabetes, or your baby was premature or smaller than 2.7 kilograms at birth), your baby may not have gotten enough iron during pregnancy. Content source Featured image source

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