Newborn Care

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7 Simple Tips To Make Your Baby Comfortable In Summers

A newborn’s skin is extremely delicate and so is the baby's immune system. Chemicals, fragrances, and dyes in clothing, detergents, and baby products can cause irritation to the baby’s skin along with other complications such as rashes, dryness and chaffing. In the summer season, the hot winds can cause even further dryness to the baby’s skin. The first year of life is very crucial for the baby, so, it is of utmost importance to protect your child’s skin in the hot summer months. Here are 7 simple tips to make your baby comfortable in summers: Increase your baby’s fluid intake - One can easily get dehydrated in the summer season, so make it a point to give enough water to your little one. If your child is younger than 6 months of age and is still breastfeeding, then you need to increase your own intake of fluids so that you can produce enough milk. Give the baby lots of seasonal fruits and juices Include lots of seasonal fruits and their juices in your little one’s diet since they not only provide the much-needed nutrients to your child’s body but also supply water to him/her. Make your baby wear light cotton clothes - Always dress up your child in light-colored cotton clothes so that his/her skin is able to breathe and he/she doesn’t get any rashes from tight clothes. Summer Skin Care - Baby skin is very delicate and needs to be handled with utmost care. Here’s how you can take care of your baby’s delicate skin in the summers- Wash - Resist the urge to bathe the baby too frequently since this can remove the natural oils of the baby’s skin and making it dry and vulnerable. Use only a  pea-sized amount of a natural body wash to bathe your baby. You can use coconut-oil based cleansers to clean the baby’s delicate skin since they soothe the baby’s skin without causing any harmful effects. One such cleanser is The Moms Co. Natural Baby Wash and it has the added benefits of avocado oil, chamomile oil, and aloe vera gel, which soften your baby’s delicate skin. Shampoo - Do not shampoo the baby’s hair every day. When it comes to newborn skincare, “Less is more”. You need to use only a pea-sized amount of shampoo to rinse the baby’s scalp and you need not shampoo the baby’s head every day. A shampoo with organic ingredients is more suitable since you definitely don’t want to take any chances with your newborn’s skin. The Moms Co. Natural Baby Shampoo is a coconut oil-based cleanser that cleanses the baby’s scalp gently and also conditions the baby’s hair with its organic argan and moringa oil.  Moisturize - The best time to moisturize the baby’s body is right after a bath because this is the time when the skin is able to absorb the moisture easily. Using a mild lotion on the skin after a bath. So, make it a point to apply a mild body lotion on the baby’s skin after giving him/her a bath. One of the best options is to apply The Moms Co. Natural Baby Lotion, which has the right ingredients such as organic shea butter, cocoa butter and organic jojoba oil to hydrate and nourish your baby’s delicate skin. This natural baby lotion is mineral-free and this makes even more reliable for your little one. Prevent Sweat - Baby skin is prone to rashes due to sweat so, keep your baby’s skin sweat-free with a talc-free powder during the hot summer months. Nowadays most powders contain talc and fragrances which can be harmful to the baby but The Moms Co. Natural Talc-Free Baby Powder is prepared with cornstarch and helps to absorb the extra moisture within the folds of your child’s skin. It’s organic chamomile and calendula oils help to soothe your baby’s delicate skin. 5. Wash baby clothes before being worn - Before touching your baby’s skin, the new clothes that you bought, might have been in a clothes rack for a long time, might have accumulated dirt and would have been touched by many others. Always wash your baby’s clothes with a mild detergent and an antiseptic before making him/her wear them. This helps to get rid of all the dirt and germs. 6. Avoid taking the baby out during peak hours - As much as possible, avoid taking the baby out during the time when the sun is the hottest, i.e. between 10 am - 4 pm. Schedule outings either before or after this time. Whenever you step out, make the baby wear a hat and carry an umbrella to provide shade to your little one. 7. Do not go in and out of the AC too often - A sudden temperature change can lead to a runny nose and also affect the baby’s skin adversely. Whenever you need to take the baby out of an airconditioned room, turn off the AC, wait for 5-10 minutes and then go. When you’re coming from outside with your little one, do not turn on the AC immediately. Allow the baby’s body to cool a bit under the fan and then turn on the AC. For more such informative articles and videos, download the Mylo App now! Register on the app if you haven't already and get tips worth Rs. 10,000/- for free! Disclaimer: This blog is supported by The Moms Co.

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Symptoms and Remedies for Teething in Babies

The first tooth is a big event in your baby’s young life, but it can be uncomfortable. The more you know about teething, the better you can help your baby get through it. Schedule a trip to the dentist after her first tooth arrives (usually around 6 months), or generally by her first birthday. Signs of Teething Most babies begin to teethe between 4-7 months old. But some start much later. The symptoms aren’t the same for every baby, but they may include: Swollen, tender gums Fussiness and crying A slightly raised temperature (less than 101 F) Gnawing or wanting to chew on hard things Lots of drool Changes in eating or sleeping patterns What works to soothe a friend’s baby might not work for yours. You may need to try different things to help your little one feel better. Often, something cold in your baby’s mouth helps. Try a cold pacifier, spoon, clean wet washcloth, or a solid (not liquid) refrigerated teething toy or ring. Some experts say frozen teething toys are too cold and may hurt your baby’s mouth. Make sure to clean teething toys, washcloths, and other items after the baby uses them. Babies -- especially those who are teething -- love to chew. It’s OK to let your baby chew as much as she wants. Just make sure you know what she’s putting into her mouth and that it’s safe and clean. A hard, unsweetened teething cracker can be comforting. If your baby is older than 6-9 months, you can offer cool water from a sippy cup, too. You can also massage her gums by gently rubbing them with your clean finger. If the teeth haven’t come in yet, you can let your baby gnaw on your finger. If you’re nursing your baby, try dipping your fingers in cool water and massaging her gums before each feeding. That may keep her from biting your nipple while nursing. Medicine that you rub on your baby’s gums to stop the pain of teething may not help. It quickly washes away in the mouth. Stay away from over-the-counter teething gels and liquids that have the ingredient benzocaine. The FDA says this ingredient shouldn’t be given to children under 2. It can cause rare but serious side effects. A small dose of a children’s pain reliever, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, may help your baby. But ask your doctor before giving her any medication, and use it exactly as the doctor says. Teething can be rough for you and your baby at first. But it’ll get easier as you both learn how to soothe each new tooth that pops out.  

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3 month old baby sleep and feeding schedule

Now that you have had three months with your baby, you would have noticed how they have grown and developed tremendously during the past 12 weeks. You would notice them falling into a routine and developing a pattern of behavior. Here, we discuss what your three-month old’s sleeping and feeding schedule should look like and some tips to help both you and the baby to settle down. Sleep Schedule Most babies would have started regulating their sleep schedules by now. They would be sleeping for longer hours and would have more wake times during the day. Usually, a three-month baby would sleep for around 15 hours a day. Of this, they would sleep 11-12 hours in the night and need 1 long nap and 3-4 short naps during the day. As the baby grows, the catnaps would further reduce to 3 during the day with more wake time occupying their time. This is the best time to introduce them to a sleep-wake-feed pattern that would encourage them to sleep longer stretches. If you notice that your baby, who was sleeping comfortably throughout the night, has started waking up frequently at night, do not worry. This is a temporary phase and happens when a child is going through a growth spurt, either physically or mentally. Feeding Schedule Just like your child is able to consolidate its sleep, it would also be able to regulate its feed. As the baby’s capacity has increased quite a bit since they were born, they would be able to go longer between feeds. Additionally, the baby would require less of night feed now and would be more interested in feeding during the day. At this stage, the baby should be taking around 170-200 ml of formula milk every 4-5 hours and 6-8 breastfeeds every 24 hours. Things to Remember While Scheduling Keep these things in mind when you start setting your child’s sleep and feeding schedule. A three-month old baby’s feeding schedule should not go beyond 6 feeds of formula milk in a 24-hour period. This means approximately 950 ml of formula milk. A child needs at least 15 hours of sleep in a day, including night sleep and naps. Babies usually take four naps a day, morning, afternoon, early evening and late evening. During the wake time, you need to make time to do things like massaging and bathing, playing games, strolling in the park, reading, etc. This would help them develop their strength and learn new skills. Sample Schedule 7:00 — Wake up 8:00 — Feeding time 8:30 — Short nap 9:00 — Wake up and feed 10:00 – Massage and bath 11:00 — Feed and long nap 1:00 — Wake up and feed 1:30 – Playing or reading 2:00 — Short nap 2:30 — Wake up and feed 3:00 – Playing, exercising or reading 4:30 — Feed and short nap 5:00 – Stroller walk 6:30 — Feed 7:00 — Catnap 7:30 – Playing 9:00 — Feed and bedtime 10:30 — Top-up feed + 1-3 night feedings Ensure that the top-up feed is given at mother’s bedtime, so that she can also have a longer stretch of sleep. This is just a guideline schedule and you would have to work out your schedule according to your and your baby’s comfort. Featured Image Source  

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Is using an air conditioner safe with a newborn?

Yes, it is safe, provided you take a few precautions. Most doctors agree that it is safer to use a cooler or an air conditioner (AC) with a newborn than to let him stay in a hot, airless and humid environment. Babies, particularly newborns, can't adjust their body temperature as well as adults. This makes them vulnerable to overheating and heat-related illnesses such as heat rash, dehydration, heat exhaustion or heatstroke. Some experts say that a properly cooled and ventilated room helps your baby to sleep comfortably and reduces the risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome). On the other hand, a room that is too cold could severely lower your baby's body temperature and chill him. Follow these tips to help keep your baby safe and comfortable while using an air conditioner or cooler: Maintain a comfortable room temperature: Changes in the outside heat and humidity can affect the cooling of your AC or cooler. Your room could get chilly or warm very quickly, making it uncomfortable for your baby. So, keep the temperature at a comfortable setting, that is not too cold or too warm. Our paediatrician, Dr Saroja Balan, recommends maintaining a range between 23 and 26 degrees C. If you are using an AC, set the timer for the duration it takes to cool down the room. If your AC doesn't have an inbuilt timer, use an alarm clock to remind you. If it doesn't have a temperature display, keep a thermometer in the room to help you monitor the temperature. If you are using a cooler, leave a window or door partly open to allow the passage of air, especially in humid weather such as the monsoon. As a cooler evaporates water to cool, it increases the humidity in the air. In a closed room, the humidity keeps going up and eventually the cooling will stop. This can bring a gradual rise in the temperature, making the room hot and sticky. If you are using an air conditioner or a cooler, you may follow the tips given below for the safety of your baby:  Keep your baby away from the direct blast of cold air from the AC or cooler Dress your baby in light layers that cover his arms and legs. Doing so will protect your baby from cold air You may like to try a light cap for his head and some light cotton socks to cover his feet If you plan to use a light blanket, make sure you tuck it below his elbows to avoid covering his face Ideally your baby should wear one more layer than you and should not be dressed too warmly for the room or wrapped too snugly Content source Featured image source

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Is it normal for a newborn to poop after every feeding?

As a new mom, you may be concerned and anxious to see your baby passing a stool after every feed. You may be wondering if it is normal for your baby to poop after every feed or is your baby pooping too much? Just relax because it’s normal for babies to poop after every feed. Pooping after every meal is actually a good sign that your baby is getting plenty of milk. To know more on this, read below: Is It Normal For My Baby To Poop After Every Feed? Yes, it is perfectly normal for babies to poop after every feeding session. Some babies poop after every feed and some after every 3-5 days. In fact pooping after every feed indicates that your baby is in good health and getting enough milk. The frequency of stools can slow down between 3 to 6 weeks of birth as your baby’s stomach grows and she settles into a routine. But then some babies still continue pooping after every feed for as long as one year. Every baby is different. So, if your baby’s bowel movements are fairly consistent and he is his usual cheerful self, there is nothing to be concerned about frequent poops. Do Breastfed Babies Poop More? Pooping after every feed is common among breastfed babies. Breastfed babies poop more frequently than formula-fed babies. This is because breast milk contains immunoglobulins. These are substances produced by the body’s immune system. They also work as a natural laxative and are very helpful for clearing meconium in the initial days. They also contribute to frequent pooping and lack of constipation in breastfed babies. It’s quite normal for some babies to have fewer bowel movements after 6 weeks. There may be cases where your baby may be pooping only once a week. But there is nothing to be alarmed about. How Many Times A Day Do Formula Fed Babies Poop? Formula fed babies generally pass fewer stools than breastfed babies. This is for the simple reason that formula can be harder to digest as a result takes longer to pass through your baby’s system. But there may be instances where your formula fed babies will be pooping after every feed especially during the early weeks. How many times a day a formula fed baby poops differs from baby to baby and also changes as your baby grows. For some formula fed babies, during the first month, three bowel moments are considered normal while for others the frequency can go upto 5 poops a day. Between 1-2 months, the frequency of bowel movements changes in babies. So now your baby might just be passing one stool every day to one every other day. For some babies, passing stool once every two days is also considered normal. Just keep in mind that as long as the poop has the consistency of peanut butter, there is nothing to worry about. How Often Does A Baby Poop After Starting Solids? Once your baby starts solids around six months, the frequency of his poop will be affected. The frequency, color, and smell of the poop will change once your baby is on solid feed. Your baby may poop several times in a day or he may go without a bowel movement for several days. We can attribute this to their immature digestive system. When your baby’s system is matured enough to process the solid food efficiently, you will notice that the bowel movement of your baby returns to normal once again. Content source Featured image source

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Four-weeks old baby: Health, growth, care and more

At 4 weeks, your baby is almost a month old and you've both gone through an enormous amount of change in a very short period of time. Before you do anything else, give yourself a pat on the back for making it this far and recognise all that you have accomplished since you met your little one. You’ve made it through sleepless nights, struggled through feedings, and learnt to do pretty much any task one-handed. But just like every new week so far, there’s plenty more in store for both of you! Here’s what you need to know about your 4-week-old baby. Developmental Milestones: Some babies will develop a little faster than others and some babies may need time to “catch up.” At 4 weeks old, your baby might be able to: Body Hold their head up for a few minutes Lift hands toward the face or mouth, but it won’t be long before they reach their mouth! Control more head movement, like turning the neck from side to side Make jerky, quivering arm thrusts Keep hands in tight fists Continue strong reflex movements Brain Recognize you, your partner, or family members with widened eyes  See more clearly, up to about 18 inches in front of them Listen intently when you speak or sing Start to coo May turn toward familiar sounds, including your voice. Hearing is fully developed at this stage. Study human faces Baby Care Basics: By four weeks, chances are you’ve become a diaper-changing pro! Whether you are using cloth diapers or disposable diapers, your little one may start experiencing a diaper rash from time to time, especially during the summer months. To help prevent and treat diaper rash: Change your baby’s diaper more frequently: As soon as you notice the diaper is wet or soiled during the day, change it.  Use a diaper rash cream: You can apply a diaper rash cream as a preventive measure, especially if your baby is prone to getting rashes.  Air it out: The best way to prevent and treat diaper rash is to let your baby go all-natural.    If your baby seems excessively uncomfortable, especially after a feeding, they may be experiencing gas. Try these helpful tips: Burp after feedings: Be sure to burp your baby from the bottom upward to facilitate the air movement. Switching formulas: Your infant may need to change formulas several times before finding one that works best for their digestive system. Change bottles: Bottles and nipples are all made differently, so it might be helpful to try several types of bottles and nipples that have different kinds of airflow to experiment with what reduces gas in your little one. Health & Safety At 4 weeks old, your baby will have another well-child check-up. At this visit, the pediatrician will evaluate your baby’s growth and development and go over important safety guidelines with you. You can expect to be asked about: Your home environment: If you smoke, you should quit to reduce the risk of SIDS and increase your baby’s health. No smoke or secondhand smoke should be around the baby. Car seat safety: At 4 weeks old, your infant should be in a rear-facing infant seat. Vaccines: The second dose of the Hepatitis B vaccine may also be administered at this visit. Content source Featured image source

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How can I cure my newborn’s hiccups?

Seeing your baby grow can be called as the most beautiful thing in the world. During this process, you get to hear your newborn’s little coos, tiny yawns, laughters, cries etc. However, sometimes a few sounds may leave you worried and you find it hard to conclude if it is normal for your baby. When your baby hiccups, the sound may appear to be cute but you might be wondering if it is normal. You will be glad to hear that it is perfectly normal for your baby to hiccup. Baby and newborn’s hiccups do not cause any harm and just one sign of your baby’s growth and development.  If you want to cure your newborn’s hiccups, the following tips given below may prove helpful: Take a break and burp: Taking a break from a feeding to burp your baby may help get rid of the hiccups, since burping can get rid of excess gas that may be causing the hiccups. Burping will also help because it places your baby into an upright position. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests burping your bottle-fed baby after every 2 to 3 ounces. If your baby is breastfed, you should burp them after they switch breasts. Use a pacifier: Infant hiccups don’t always start from a feeding. When your baby starts to hiccup on their own, try allowing them to suck on a pacifier, as this will help relax the diaphragm and may help stop the bout of hiccups. Let them stop on their own: More often than not, your baby’s hiccups will stop on their own. If they aren’t bothering your baby, then you can just let them run their course. If you don’t interfere and your baby’s hiccups don’t stop on their own, let their doctor know. While rare, it’s possible for hiccups to be a sign of a more serious medical issue. Try gripe water: If your baby seems to be in discomfort because of their hiccups, then you may want to try feeding them gripe water. Gripe water is a combination of herbs and water that is believed by some to help with colic and other intestinal discomforts. The types of herbs can vary and may include ginger, fennel, chamomile, and cinnamon. Though gripe water has not been shown to help with hiccups in babies, it’s a fairly low-risk product. Before you give your baby anything new, it’s always recommended that you discuss it with your baby’s doctor. Content source Featured image source    

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Babycare tips for 6 month old baby

1. Your Baby’s Nutritional Needs One of the most important tips to take care of a six-month-old baby is your baby’s diet and nutrition. By six months your baby is all set for solid foods because by this age not only his body’s nutritional demands have increased, but his developing digestive system is ready for solid foods too. Also, breast milk lacks iron, and it is very important for your baby’s growth and thus giving fortified cereals to your baby will be a good idea. You can give pureed fruits to your baby too. However, milk will still be the main source of nutrition to your baby, and your baby may still be on the breast or formula milk till he turns one. But it will be a good idea to start giving sipper cup to your baby once in a while. 2. Your Baby’s Sleep Sleep is very important for healthy growth of your baby. Make sure your baby takes two to three naps in a day and sleeps for almost 10 hours at night. It is recommended that you follow a sleep-schedule for your baby and try to put your baby to sleep almost at the same time every day. Ensure there are no distractions in the room and you create a calm and peaceful environment for your baby. Babies at this age become quite aware of their surroundings and may get easily distracted. 3. Your Baby’s Developmental Milestones Your little one is very active by the time he turns six months. He is able to roll, sit with support, babble a few words and does various other things. Your baby may feel wary of strangers and may feel comfortable with people he sees on a regular basis. All these developmental changes may make your baby little demanding. It is very important for you as a parent to keep your calm and meet and tend to your baby’s requirements. It may get a bit daunting, and it is recommended that you may ask for help from family members and friends. 4. Your Baby’s Teething By six months of age your baby begins teething, and this can be a difficult time for your baby. Your baby’s gums may feel itchy, and he may drool all the time. Your baby will put start to put things in his mouth. It is suggested that you get good teething toys for your baby and make sure you keep them clean. Massing your baby’s gums is a good way of relieving itching. 5. Your Baby’s Communicational Skills Your baby is well aware of his surroundings by this age, though he may not talk or understand much. It is very important that you talk, sing and read to your baby. You can play games such as peek-a-boo, read a book with bigger and brighter pictures or simply sing a lullaby to your baby. Your baby is listening to you and building up his vocabulary. 6. Your Baby’s Health And Well-Being Your baby will get his third set of vaccinations by this age. Your baby may get following vaccinations by six months of age: Feature Image Source

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What to get when you are Expecting

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Essential items to pack in your hospital bag

Your delivery is just round the corner and you are so stressed that you keep forgetting what to keep for the D-Day. So here's a quick check list for you to organize yourself and enjoy your less chaotic days. Smartphone and Charger It's true that today you just can't be without your phone. Since you may be messaging, calling or replying a lot, before and after the delivery, keep your chargers handy, too.  Important Documents A picture ID, health insurance information, and hospital registration forms. Even if you've already registered at the hospital, some hospitals need to confirm your records before they can admit you. Toiletries Deodorant, body wash, shampoo, facial cleansing wipes, toothpaste, and a toothbrush are necessities. Don’t forget the lip balm and moisturizer – hospitals rooms may make your skin dry, so keep all your personal stuff ready. Hair Care Products Head bands, shampoo, conditoner, dry shampoo, oil, and hair brush. Cash and Change Hospital food for your partner and tips to the staff at the end of your stay will make you run out of change. So stuff your wallets.Homecoming Outfit for Baby Pack a newborn-size kimono-style shirt, with footed pants so you don't have to bring socks. You'll likely get a receiving blanket and hat in the hospital, so skip those unless you've got your heart set on a specific style. Extra Outfit for You Here's a hint: You'll probably still look about 5 months pregnant, so skip your non-maternity skinnies and pack your favorite maternity dress or leggings and a tunic. (Trust us: Not fitting into your going-home outfit is a bummer!) Sleepwear and Underwear A cotton nightie will be much more comfortable than a hospital gown, and a robe will come in handy for walking the hallways. Several pairs of undies are also a must for any hospital bag checklist (briefs, maternity, or disposables like Depends) if you don't want to wear the mesh underwear the hospital gives you after delivery.Flip-Flops Bring flip-flops for the shower or to wear home if your feet are swollen. Slippers and/or Heavy Socks Keep your toes toasty and clean, whether you're in bed or strolling around on the cold tile floor. Bring a pair that's easily laundered, as they may get a bit dirty. Extra Undies and Extra-Absorbent Pads You're going to need these after delivery. It might also be helpful to pack lidocaine spray or witch hazel pads (to relieve pain from tearing). Nursing Bra Bring a nursing tank or bra that's comfortable enough to sleep in.  Music, Movies, and Magazines, Books. Load up your smartphone or tablet with tunes and anything you might want to binge-watch on Netflix. It'll help district you—and your partner—during a long labor. An Extra Bag or Two With all the goodies from the hospital—diapers, blankets, and creams—and all the gifts from well wishers, you're bound to have more stuff coming out than you did going in. For the Baby: Most of the things will be provided by the hospital and you will be charged for those anyway, but you could keep these. A set of clothes to take baby back home in A few sets of clothes/onesies/tops for baby to change into while in the hospital Caps  A blanket for the crib A blanket to carry baby back home in Diapers  Wipes

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Super Boss: Four Women On Juggling Motherhood And Work

Seema Patel, 36, mother of two Seema Patel, a lawyer and deputy director of San Francisco’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement, was taking her first steps at a government job in Washington DC a few years ago when her then-boss sat her down with an unexpected piece of advice. “I don’t know anything about you,” her boss said. “But if you have any plans to have a family in the future, start saving your leave right now.” Patel’s employer was the federal government, and she didn’t get a day of paid maternity leave as part of her work arrangement. Get Society Weekly: our newsletter for public service professionals  Back then, Patel was unmarried and very career-focused, and a family was the last thing on her mind. But diligently, she took her boss’s word for it. She avoided using her sick days over the course of four years so that when she eventually did have her first child two years ago, she had accumulated enough to get three months paid time off. When she had her second baby six months ago, Patel could not pull the same trick. The four months she took off were entirely unpaid. Patel says she experienced no pushback from colleagues, but it is the work structure she has an issue with. “I find it extremely unsupportive for anyone trying to have family,” she says. “It sends a message: your country does not value you becoming a parent.” Karen Choi, 41, mother of four Karen Choi, a vice-president at asset management firm Capital Group, says that any working woman who is a mother should be applauded. Choi, who has four children including a six-month-old baby, describes juggling being a mother and a job “a constant struggle”. Secrets for keeping your head above water include having an “unbelievably supportive family” as well as a nanny and babysitter, accepting that there are some areas you are not going to be the best at (“Not everyone can be the Martha of home décor”), and simply getting through it. Advertisement Choi says she took more maternity leave with every child she had, starting with two and a half months with her first child, and taking six months off with her latest. This makes her an exception, especially within her industry. “When your child is sick, has a fever, is throwing up and you are up all night taking care of your child and knowing that the next morning you have to get your other kids to school and then you have to go to work ... That’s when it gets to be very challenging”, she says. Her firm was supportive, though, and she stresses her investment portfolio’s performance did not suffer at all. When she entered the finance industry after university, about 20 or so of her female college mates chose the same path, she says. Today about 90% of them have left. Women who exit jobs and then re-enter are likely to no longer be on track for peak earning positions, she says. Staying is tough: “A sacrifice in the short term, but it pays in the long term.” If nothing else, her children have helped provide meaning for this sacrifice, she says, because all four of her children are daughters. “One of the things that keep me going is the fact that I would like to be a role model for them.” Kelly Posner, 48, mother of four The notion of being a role model to her four children is also what drives 48-year-old research scientist and professor Kelly Posner. “They know that their mom is out there literally helping to save lives.” Posner, who is the founder and director of the Center for Suicide Risk Assessment at Columbia University, says it is important for women to know that they can have a “big goal” career-wise and achieve it. “It is very important for women to believe that they can have a vision. Most women do not allow themselves to think that” she says. She once gave a presentation to 200 people, including government officials in Italy over a webinar while eight months pregnant. Technology has also helped, she says, with the ability to stop the car and take a call after picking her kids up, or to answer an email on the go. Juggling motherhood with a demanding career has been helped by an optimistic, problem-solving disposition, she says – an ability to get through things even when they feel impossible. Jennifer Epps-Addison, 33, mother of two Jennifer Epps-Addison, 33, the executive director of Wisconsin Jobs Now and a mother of two, says that only being able to make career and motherhood work together thanks to private networks of help – like nannies – is wrong. “You shouldn’t have to get lucky or win the lottery to be able to succeed,” she says, describing the systemic failure to support women and families – citing oppressively low wages, a flawed health care system and a lack of mandated paid maternity leave. “As a society, we are not taking care of each other,” she says. “We cannot even guarantee mothers who have just birthed a child to recuperate.” Epps-Addison, who was pregnant while attending law school, gave birth to one of her children while she was on a fellowship. With a husband and offspring relying on the healthcare provided by the fellowship, the labor leader was only able to take two weeks' maternity leave, she says, before returning to work. Content Source

Transitioning back to work after the baby: Tips for working moms

Top Seven Tips for Moms Returning to Work (outside the home): 1) If at all possible, return to work on a Thursday (if you work full time) so that you have a short work week initially. Then you have the weekend to review how to make necessary adjustments for the following week. And you enter the new week knowing you can do this! It is empowering to get through the first week, even if it is a short one. 2) If pumping, find out ahead of time where you can have privacy. Is there a lactation room at your work? Or an office with a lock on it? You don’t want someone barging in on you while in a vulnerable position. If you try pumping, and you find you just don’t have the energy to continue, perhaps partial supplementation with a formula for your baby will be just fine. Then you can breast-feed when you are with your baby at night and on weekends.  3) Bring snacks and water. It is so important to stay hydrated and keep blood sugar even. It’s easy to forget to eat or drink water when multi-tasking. Remember that proper nutrition, including continuing with prenatal vitamins (if breastfeeding and doctor recommends), is essential to good mood health. Bring high-protein snacks (like almonds and string cheese) to graze on throughout the day and before/after lunch. What is good for your body is good for your mental state. 4) Allow yourself to cry. You will miss your baby. A lot. Initially, it will be very tough. Bring Kleenex. Give yourself the time and space to let the tears flow in the company of supportive people who understand your transition. Then distract yourself with tasks at hand to ground yourself back in the present. Reward yourself with some nice adult conversation and a cup of delicious coffee or herbal tea. Savor being able to enjoy a chat with your colleagues uninterrupted by baby’s needs. 5) It may be helpful to bring a transitional object that reminds you of your connection with your baby, like a picture of the baby, or a little bootie with his/her scent. Some women laugh that they have a “baby shrine” of baby photos at their desks so that they feel connected to their little one while away. Leave a photo of you with the baby and an item with your scent on it (a robe or article of clothing). You stay connected through your senses that way throughout the day. 6) Align yourself with other working moms. They are invaluable as support when you are having a tough day balancing it all. These mammas are doing what you are doing and more than likely have some emotional support and tricks up the sleeve that has helped them weather the storm of transitioning back to work.  Don’t reinvent the wheel. Go to the seasoned mammas for support and guidance. 7) If at all possible, work for a family-friendly company. All moms/families deserve to have the flexibility they need to make work/family life balance possible. Sadly, not all employers embrace this philosophy. Some employers also have generous family leave policies. Check Working Mother magazine for the top employers who are “family-friendly.” I especially love companies that have on-site daycare. Content Source    

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Work after baby: Making the successful transition

The decision to go back to work after spending some quality time with the newborn can be emotionally draining for a new mom. Most of the moms find it tough to resume their work and stay away from their babies for several hours. Becoming a working mother can cause several conflicting feelings in the mind: Guilt that you are leaving your baby in charge of a caretaker. Relief that you are making your baby learn to live away from you. Guilt that you are feeling relieved to be away from your newborn. Missing the baby at the workplace. These contradictory emotions are totally normal and expected from a new mother. Given below are some of the tips that will help you ease those back-work-jitters and make the transition successful. Have a backup childcare plan: If your baby gets sick (and she will) or your childcare facility is closed for a day or your babysitter is stuck in traffic, be prepared with alternative arrangements so you're not scrambling at the last minute. Manage your time well: You've got a pretty compelling reason to get your work done as your baby is waiting for you at home. Time management at work is very important for a successful career. Ask for support: This is a tough time, so lean on your spouse, friends, family, other working moms, and anyone else who's willing to help you make this transition. Don't forget about you: If you're completely exhausted and emotionally depleted, you won't do either of your "jobs" effectively. Try to get as much rest as possible, do some exercise for a healthy mind and body. Bring a little bit of baby to work: Arrange a couple of cute photos on your desk or in your workspace or locker. You can also create a virtual gallery. You may use your photos to create a slide show starring your little one on your computer screen. It's easy to do and easy to update as your baby grows. Call home for your "coo" fix: There's nothing like hearing the sound of your baby's gurgles to feel connected (hearing him crying is another matter altogether). It's fine to ring up your caregiver once or twice a day. Just don't get crazy and check in every hour. Try to time your calls so your baby is alert and happy. Content source Featured image source

Slow weight gain in breastfed babies

Most breastfed babies will get enough breast milk and gain weight in a consistent and expected pattern as long as they latch on well and breastfeed often. But, what if you think your child isn't getting what he needs to grow and thrive? If you're breastfeeding and your newborn is gaining weight slowly or inconsistently then he may not be getting enough breast milk. So, here's what to look for and what to do if you think your child isn't gaining weight well. Breastfeeding and Slow Weight Gain Breastfed newborns can lose up to 10 percent of their birth weight during the first week. Then, by the time a child is two weeks old, he should regain the weight that was lost. After that, for the next three months or so, breastfed babies gain about 28 gram per day. Of course, every newborn is different, and some children just normally grow more slowly than others. So, as long as your baby is breastfeeding well and his health care exams are on target, a slower weight gain may not be an issue. When Slow Weight Gain Is a Problem Weight gain is the best sign that a child is getting enough breast milk. When a baby is gaining weight slower than expected, it could mean that she's not getting enough. So, if your newborn is not back to her birth weight in two weeks, or she's not gaining weight consistently after that, it may be that there's a breastfeeding issue that's preventing your child from getting enough breast milk. The Reasons Your Baby May Not Be Gaining Weight as Expected Your newborn is not latching on well: A good latch allows your child to remove the breast milk from your breast without getting tired out and frustrated. If your baby is not latching on correctly, or latching on to just your nipple, she won't be able to remove the breast milk very well. Your baby isn't breastfeeding often enough: Breastfeed your newborn at least every two to three hours through the day and night for the first six to eight weeks. If he wants to breastfeed more often, put him back to the breast. Your child is not breastfeeding long enough at each feeding: Newborns should breastfeed for about 8 to 10 minutes on each side. As your child gets older, she won't need to breastfeed as long to get the breast milk she needs, but during the first few weeks, try to keep her awake and actively sucking for as long as you can. Your little one is in pain: If your baby is not comfortable because of a birth injury or an infection such as thrush in her mouth, she may not breastfeed well, and therefore she may be gaining weight slowly. You have a low breast milk supply: A low milk supply can prevent your child from getting enough breast milk, but it could also be the result of your baby not breastfeeding well. It's a bit of a vicious cycle. The good news is that a typical low milk supply can often be recovered pretty easily.   Content source Featured image source

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Introducing solid foods to your baby: Quick tips

As your baby gets older, she starts to need solid food so she can get enough iron and other essential nutrients for growth and development. For about the first six months of life, your baby uses iron stored in his body from when he was in the womb. He also gets some iron from breastmilk and/or infant formula. But your baby’s iron stores go down as he grows. And by around six months, he can’t get the iron he needs from breast milk or infant formula alone. Introducing solids is also important for helping your baby learn to eat, giving her experience of new tastes and textures from a range of foods, developing her teeth and jaws, and building other skills that she’ll need later for language development. Signs that it’s time for introducing solids: Your baby’s individual development and behaviour will guide you when you’re trying to work out when to start introducing solids. Signs your baby is ready for solids include when your baby: Has good head and neck control and can sit upright when supported Shows an interest in food – for example, by looking at what’s on your plate Reaches out for your food Opens his mouth when you offer him food on a spoon. Most babies start to show these signs around six months, but the signs happen at different times for different babies. It’s not recommended to introduce solids before four months. If your baby is nearing seven months of age and hasn’t started solids, you might like to get some advice from your child and family health nurse or GP. How to introduce solids: Food timing When you’re first introducing solids, it’s a good idea to offer solids when you and your baby are both happy and relaxed. Your baby is also more likely to try solids after a feed of breastmilk or formula. This is because when babies are really hungry, they just want the breastmilk or formula that they know satisfies their hunger. They’ll still have room to try new foods after they’ve had a feed of breastmilk or formula. As time passes, you’ll learn when your baby is hungry or full, not interested or tired. Signs of hunger include your baby: Getting excited when she sees you getting her food ready Leaning towards you while she’s sitting in the highchair Opening her mouth as you’re about to feed her Signs your baby is no longer interested include: Turning his head away Losing interest or getting distracted Pushing the spoon away Clamping his mouth shut Content source Featured image source  

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Dry Skin in Babies: All that you need to know

It isn’t uncommon for baby skin to be flaky and peeling off. Most new parents expect their newborns to have soft and supple skin but this is just a myth. A newborn’s skin is a lot thinner than an adult’s skin. It is very sensitive and it doesn’t produce as many natural oils as an adult body does. This is one of the reasons why it is prone to get chapped easily.    Why does newborn skin peel? When your baby comes out of the womb, his/her body is covered with various liquids, including amniotic fluid, vernix, and blood. Your baby spends 9 months in the womb surrounded by amniotic fluid. The vernix acts as a protective barrier between the skin and the amniotic fluid. Once the vernix is wiped off, the baby’s skin starts peeling off within 1-3 weeks. Some babies shed more skin while some shed less, but this is nothing to worry about.  However, some babies may have extremely dry skin since this is how the texture of their skin is. Such babies experience chapping, dryness, itchiness and rash-like patches on their skin due to serious skin problems such as Eczema and Ichthyosis. If your baby’s skin is cracking often, you need to be really careful and adopt ways to prevent dryness of the baby’s skin.    How to treat dry skin in babies?  Although some amount of peeling is normal, it isn’t a bad idea to provide gentle care to your baby’s delicate skin from the very beginning. Here are some simple tips to treat dry skin in babies:  1. Reduce exposure to cold air - Cold air is dry and tends to dry out your baby’s skin as well. Limit your baby’s exposure to cold air as much as possible.  2. Use a Humidifier - Placing a humidifier in the room is a great way to keep the air in the room moist.  3. Keep the baby hydrated - Dehydration can also lead to dryness and skin peeling, so make sure that you breastfeed your baby at regular intervals. If your baby is older than 6 months of age, you may give some water to your baby at the recommendation of a pediatrician.  4. Use organic and soothing products on your baby’s skin - When your baby’s skin is so sensitive, you shouldn’t just use any random products on your baby’s skin. A coconut oil-based gentle cleanser or an oatmeal bath can prove to be very soothing for the baby’s delicate skin. The clinically proven non-drying Natural Soothing Relief Wash by The Moms Co. contains both the above ingredients, along with organic calendula oil and aloe vera gel. It gently cleanses the baby’s skin, without causing any irritation.  You need to provide around the clock moisturization to your baby’s dry skin. Natural Soothing Relief Lotion by The Moms Co. has a clinically proven 24- hour moisturization formula and it also contains, colloidal oatmeal, calendula oil, and aloe vera gel, which help to relieve itching and eczema. Applying the soothing relief lotion after a bath is the best way to lock the moisture. The Soothing Relief Range by The Moms Co. is clinically proven to treat redness, rashes, and itchiness on the baby’s skin.  5. Limit bath time and do not rub the baby’s skin- Prolonged bathtime using hot water can affect the baby’s skin adversely. Limit the bathtime to not more than 7-10 minutes and always bathe the baby with lukewarm water. Hot water washes away the natural oils of the skin. Never rub your baby’s skin too harshly after a bath, since this can further aggravate the peeling of the skin. Just pat dry your baby’s skin with a soft towel after bathing him/her.  6. Dress your baby appropriately - Always choose soft cotton clothes for your baby, which aren’t too tight. This helps to prevent skin irritation and rashes. Also, make it a point to wash your baby’s clothes with a mild detergent.    Disclaimer: This blog is supported by The Moms Co.

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