Motherhood

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What to get when you are Expecting

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Essential items to pack in your hospital bag

Your delivery is just round the corner and you are so stressed that you keep forgetting what to keep for the D-Day. So here's a quick check list for you to organize yourself and enjoy your less chaotic days. Smartphone and Charger It's true that today you just can't be without your phone. Since you may be messaging, calling or replying a lot, before and after the delivery, keep your chargers handy, too.  Important Documents A picture ID, health insurance information, and hospital registration forms. Even if you've already registered at the hospital, some hospitals need to confirm your records before they can admit you. Toiletries Deodorant, body wash, shampoo, facial cleansing wipes, toothpaste, and a toothbrush are necessities. Don’t forget the lip balm and moisturizer – hospitals rooms may make your skin dry, so keep all your personal stuff ready. Hair Care Products Head bands, shampoo, conditoner, dry shampoo, oil, and hair brush. Cash and Change Hospital food for your partner and tips to the staff at the end of your stay will make you run out of change. So stuff your wallets.Homecoming Outfit for Baby Pack a newborn-size kimono-style shirt, with footed pants so you don't have to bring socks. You'll likely get a receiving blanket and hat in the hospital, so skip those unless you've got your heart set on a specific style. Extra Outfit for You Here's a hint: You'll probably still look about 5 months pregnant, so skip your non-maternity skinnies and pack your favorite maternity dress or leggings and a tunic. (Trust us: Not fitting into your going-home outfit is a bummer!) Sleepwear and Underwear A cotton nightie will be much more comfortable than a hospital gown, and a robe will come in handy for walking the hallways. Several pairs of undies are also a must for any hospital bag checklist (briefs, maternity, or disposables like Depends) if you don't want to wear the mesh underwear the hospital gives you after delivery.Flip-Flops Bring flip-flops for the shower or to wear home if your feet are swollen. Slippers and/or Heavy Socks Keep your toes toasty and clean, whether you're in bed or strolling around on the cold tile floor. Bring a pair that's easily laundered, as they may get a bit dirty. Extra Undies and Extra-Absorbent Pads You're going to need these after delivery. It might also be helpful to pack lidocaine spray or witch hazel pads (to relieve pain from tearing). Nursing Bra Bring a nursing tank or bra that's comfortable enough to sleep in.  Music, Movies, and Magazines, Books. Load up your smartphone or tablet with tunes and anything you might want to binge-watch on Netflix. It'll help district you—and your partner—during a long labor. An Extra Bag or Two With all the goodies from the hospital—diapers, blankets, and creams—and all the gifts from well wishers, you're bound to have more stuff coming out than you did going in. For the Baby: Most of the things will be provided by the hospital and you will be charged for those anyway, but you could keep these. A set of clothes to take baby back home in A few sets of clothes/onesies/tops for baby to change into while in the hospital Caps  A blanket for the crib A blanket to carry baby back home in Diapers  Wipes

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Super Boss: Four Women On Juggling Motherhood And Work

Seema Patel, 36, mother of two Seema Patel, a lawyer and deputy director of San Francisco’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement, was taking her first steps at a government job in Washington DC a few years ago when her then-boss sat her down with an unexpected piece of advice. “I don’t know anything about you,” her boss said. “But if you have any plans to have a family in the future, start saving your leave right now.” Patel’s employer was the federal government, and she didn’t get a day of paid maternity leave as part of her work arrangement. Get Society Weekly: our newsletter for public service professionals  Back then, Patel was unmarried and very career-focused, and a family was the last thing on her mind. But diligently, she took her boss’s word for it. She avoided using her sick days over the course of four years so that when she eventually did have her first child two years ago, she had accumulated enough to get three months paid time off. When she had her second baby six months ago, Patel could not pull the same trick. The four months she took off were entirely unpaid. Patel says she experienced no pushback from colleagues, but it is the work structure she has an issue with. “I find it extremely unsupportive for anyone trying to have family,” she says. “It sends a message: your country does not value you becoming a parent.” Karen Choi, 41, mother of four Karen Choi, a vice-president at asset management firm Capital Group, says that any working woman who is a mother should be applauded. Choi, who has four children including a six-month-old baby, describes juggling being a mother and a job “a constant struggle”. Secrets for keeping your head above water include having an “unbelievably supportive family” as well as a nanny and babysitter, accepting that there are some areas you are not going to be the best at (“Not everyone can be the Martha of home décor”), and simply getting through it. Advertisement Choi says she took more maternity leave with every child she had, starting with two and a half months with her first child, and taking six months off with her latest. This makes her an exception, especially within her industry. “When your child is sick, has a fever, is throwing up and you are up all night taking care of your child and knowing that the next morning you have to get your other kids to school and then you have to go to work ... That’s when it gets to be very challenging”, she says. Her firm was supportive, though, and she stresses her investment portfolio’s performance did not suffer at all. When she entered the finance industry after university, about 20 or so of her female college mates chose the same path, she says. Today about 90% of them have left. Women who exit jobs and then re-enter are likely to no longer be on track for peak earning positions, she says. Staying is tough: “A sacrifice in the short term, but it pays in the long term.” If nothing else, her children have helped provide meaning for this sacrifice, she says, because all four of her children are daughters. “One of the things that keep me going is the fact that I would like to be a role model for them.” Kelly Posner, 48, mother of four The notion of being a role model to her four children is also what drives 48-year-old research scientist and professor Kelly Posner. “They know that their mom is out there literally helping to save lives.” Posner, who is the founder and director of the Center for Suicide Risk Assessment at Columbia University, says it is important for women to know that they can have a “big goal” career-wise and achieve it. “It is very important for women to believe that they can have a vision. Most women do not allow themselves to think that” she says. She once gave a presentation to 200 people, including government officials in Italy over a webinar while eight months pregnant. Technology has also helped, she says, with the ability to stop the car and take a call after picking her kids up, or to answer an email on the go. Juggling motherhood with a demanding career has been helped by an optimistic, problem-solving disposition, she says – an ability to get through things even when they feel impossible. Jennifer Epps-Addison, 33, mother of two Jennifer Epps-Addison, 33, the executive director of Wisconsin Jobs Now and a mother of two, says that only being able to make career and motherhood work together thanks to private networks of help – like nannies – is wrong. “You shouldn’t have to get lucky or win the lottery to be able to succeed,” she says, describing the systemic failure to support women and families – citing oppressively low wages, a flawed health care system and a lack of mandated paid maternity leave. “As a society, we are not taking care of each other,” she says. “We cannot even guarantee mothers who have just birthed a child to recuperate.” Epps-Addison, who was pregnant while attending law school, gave birth to one of her children while she was on a fellowship. With a husband and offspring relying on the healthcare provided by the fellowship, the labor leader was only able to take two weeks' maternity leave, she says, before returning to work. Content Source

Work after baby: Making the successful transition

The decision to go back to work after spending some quality time with the newborn can be emotionally draining for a new mom. Most of the moms find it tough to resume their work and stay away from their babies for several hours. Becoming a working mother can cause several conflicting feelings in the mind: Guilt that you are leaving your baby in charge of a caretaker. Relief that you are making your baby learn to live away from you. Guilt that you are feeling relieved to be away from your newborn. Missing the baby at the workplace. These contradictory emotions are totally normal and expected from a new mother. Given below are some of the tips that will help you ease those back-work-jitters and make the transition successful. Have a backup childcare plan: If your baby gets sick (and she will) or your childcare facility is closed for a day or your babysitter is stuck in traffic, be prepared with alternative arrangements so you're not scrambling at the last minute. Manage your time well: You've got a pretty compelling reason to get your work done as your baby is waiting for you at home. Time management at work is very important for a successful career. Ask for support: This is a tough time, so lean on your spouse, friends, family, other working moms, and anyone else who's willing to help you make this transition. Don't forget about you: If you're completely exhausted and emotionally depleted, you won't do either of your "jobs" effectively. Try to get as much rest as possible, do some exercise for a healthy mind and body. Bring a little bit of baby to work: Arrange a couple of cute photos on your desk or in your workspace or locker. You can also create a virtual gallery. You may use your photos to create a slide show starring your little one on your computer screen. It's easy to do and easy to update as your baby grows. Call home for your "coo" fix: There's nothing like hearing the sound of your baby's gurgles to feel connected (hearing him crying is another matter altogether). It's fine to ring up your caregiver once or twice a day. Just don't get crazy and check in every hour. Try to time your calls so your baby is alert and happy. Content source Featured image source

7 signs to show that your child loves you

We love them endlessly, and we constantly tell them that as well. However, most of our little ones haven’t mastered the art of speech yet. But, they do tell us they love us in different ways given below: 1. She stares into your eyes: Newborns love to look at faces, and yours is her favorite. That soulful gaze is a survival instinct designed to attract love and attention from a caregiver. It's also the beginning of her love for you – she's realizing just how important you are in her life. 2. She recognizes your smell: Given the choice between a dozen fragrant roses and your sweaty, milk-stained T-shirt, your baby will go for the shirt every time. "Even a 1-week-old will turn his head toward a breast pad soaked with his mother's milk. According to experts, when it comes to your newborn, nothing smells sweeter than you. 3. She smiles at you: The first time your baby gives you a true, fabulous grin is a magical moment. It's her way of saying "I love you." 4. She wants you around: About halfway through your baby's first year, you'll notice that she's not happy with your absence. She may scrunch up her face or cry when you step out of the room, and she'll smile upon your return which is a sign of her growing attachment. 5. She shares your interests: Whether you are involved in dusting the home or washing the clothes, if you scrutinise it, your baby will do the same. Called mutual attention, this behavior can start when your baby is just a few months old, but it's more pronounced at 9 to 12 months. "It's a sign that your child is engaged with you and values what you're paying attention to.  6. She uses you as a shield: Don't be surprised if your baby buries her head in your chest when someone new appears on the scene. "Stranger anxiety" is a normal phase, and turning to you for protection means your baby loves you and trusts you to keep her safe. 7. She turns to you for rescue: You're walking through the park when a big dog runs up to your toddler. She raises her arms for you to pick her up and hold her close. She trusts you to help her, and that's a way of showing love.   Content source Featured image source

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