Menstrual Cycle

A series of changes in a woman/girl's body every month as a way of preparing for a possible pregnancy

Ask anything about menstrual cycle

Hello frnd mag last LMP was on 1st July . In this month I had ovaltion study and my egg released in flipins I n 13th day of may priod .. we intercourses in ovaltion days. From last some days wet vaginal secretion is there and it is very stretchy.. bohot jada nai hota but thoda hota he . Is it sign of period or pregnancy ?

Hlo mam Mera bhacha 5 months aur13 day's k hai Ham ko periods nahi aaraha hai 13 day's jyada hogya hai aur ultrasound karane par negative bata raha hai toh me kya karu bahut tension hogya hai mai abhi dusra baby k bare me nahi soch sakti hu aur ham nahi safty v use karte thai kuch solution bataiye kya kare plzz mam

Difference Between Implantation Bleeding and Menstrual Cycle

1. Colour • Implantation Bleeding: The blood seen is usually pink or brown in colour. The brown colour that is sometimes observed is only on account of older blood. • Menstrual Cycle: The colour of the blood that is seen during periods can vary and is considered a biological health monitor for a woman. While a bright red colour can indicate new blood, a greyish hue may indicate an infection or miscarriage. 2. Duration • Implantation Bleeding: It does not last for long and has a maximum duration of 1-2 days. • Menstrual Cycle: It can last anywhere between 2-7 days. It is highly variable and depends on factors such as lifestyle and body type. 3. Discharge • Implantation Bleeding: The discharge is always highly viscous. • Menstrual Cycle: The discharge changes according to the ovulation cycle and is often considered an accurate indicator of a woman’s fertility. The mucus is an egg white colour and relatively watery when a woman is most fertile. On the other hand, the discharge becomes sticky and has a creamy texture when a woman is in her non-fertile stage. 4. Cramping • Implantation Bleeding: The cramps experienced are mild compared to what you go through during a period. They are caused due to hormonal activity after the implantation. • Menstrual Cycle: The cramps can range from mild to severe with each period. A hormone called prostaglandin causes muscle contractions within the uterine wall which is responsible for the cramps. 5. Volume • Implantation Bleeding: The amount of bleeding is minimal and in many cases, does not even require the changing of a pad. The volume of bleeding is also independent of any other condition. • Menstrual Cycle: The amount of bleeding is, on average, about 10-30 ml per period, though sometimes it can even cross 500ml! The flow is variable and depends on conditions such as the size of the individual, exercise, and hormonal levels. Content Source Featured Image Source

Is it implantation bleeding — Or just my period?

When you’re actively trying to get pregnant, those two weeks between ovulation and a positive home pregnancy test (or your period) can seem much longer. If you’re like most women, you’ll spend them hyper-aware of every ache, twinge, and craving your body has, wondering whether it’s an early sign of pregnancy. One of the most telltale symptoms of pregnancy is bleeding. If you do have some light spotting, does it mean anything? While it can be hard to tell, many women who go on to have healthy, normal pregnancies have what’s called implantation bleeding around the time that their embryo lodges itself into the side of the uterus. What is implantation bleeding? After ovulation and at the moment an egg is successfully fertilized by a sperm, the embryo starts dividing and growing, sending out signals to a woman’s body to prepare for pregnancy. In turn, the walls of the uterus, called the endometrium, start to change: They’ve already been thickening throughout the menstrual cycle, but they’ll need to grow and mature even more to protect and nourish an embryo for nine months. Anywhere from six to 12 days after fertilization, the quickly-growing embryo has moved down the Fallopian tubes to the uterus. It’s starting to need more nutrients, and the endometrium has filled in enough to support the embryo. At this time, the embryo attaches itself to the endometrium, where it becomes reliant on a mother’s body — for the first time — for nutrients and oxygen. Implantation bleeding happens when the embryo makes its way into the uterus, which sometimes causes little blood vessels to burst. When does implantation bleeding occur? When the embryo implants in the lining of the uterus, it can disrupt tiny blood vessels in the spot it burrows into. This won’t cause any problems (the endometrium recovers!) but some women will experience light bleeding, from pinkish or red to brown discharge. This so-called implantation bleeding will likely arrive earlier than your expected monthly flow (usually around five to 10 days after conception).  How do I know it’s implantation bleeding and not my period? Since implantation bleeding is a symptom that can often occur before you test positive on a pregnancy test, it can be hard to know whether light bleeding is an early sign of pregnancy or just normal spotting leading up to your period. And unfortunately, there’s no conclusive way to find out. The best way to know whether you’re pregnant or not is to wait a few more days and take a pregnancy test. The timing of when you last had sex might also help you figure it out: If it’s been more than two weeks, it’s unlikely that any spot you're having is implantation bleeding. That said, approximately one-third of women who report having experienced implantation bleeding often describe it as distinct from their usual premenstrual spotting — some say the blood is darker and not as red compared with normal period blood. Others have mild cramping at the same time as the spotting. But for many women, the two types of bleeding aren’t different at all. So you’re not alone if you assume that some spotting is implantation bleeding and get your period a few days later, or if you assume that implantation bleeding is normal spotting and end up being pregnant! When should I see my doctor? Light bleeding during pregnancy even at times other than implantation is often normal. Causes can include mundane things like irritation of the cervix following a pelvic exam, sex or infection of the vagina. But because sometimes bleeding following a positive pregnancy test can be a sign of ectopic pregnancy, molar pregnancy or miscarriage, you should always call your medical provider if you experience it so you can talk through any other symptoms. Don’t worry too much; chances are good that if the bleeding is light and doesn't last long, everything is fine. Content Source Featured Image Source

Types of white vaginal discharge and its causes

Most women experience several types of vaginal discharges throughout their monthly menstrual cycle. A woman may produce around a teaspoon of clear, thick or thin, and white odorless discharge each day, and the color may vary from white to clear to brown. It may not be noticeable, but what is visible is not totally random. The variety of colors, consistencies and textures are associated with your hormones and reflection of what is going inside your bodies at the time. The whitish discharge before the start of your period is filled with cells and fluid which will be shed from your vagina. The white discharge may sometimes look slightly yellow in color. As long as it is not accompanied by itching, discomfort, or irritation, it is normal. This part of the monthly cycle is known as the luteal phase.  When you are ovulating in the middle of the cycle vaginal discharge is stretchy, clear, or watery. Some females use discharge as a method to track potential fertility. This method is termed as fertility tracking/awareness technique or a natural family planning strategy. Thin and stretchy discharge is usually fertile, and it occurs during the time when the egg is released from the ovaries. Thick and white discharge is the infertile cervical mucus. Regardless of the texture and color, vaginal secretion keeps the vaginal tissues lubricated, infection free and healthy. So long as the vaginal mucus is not accompanied by unusual and unpleasant symptoms like rash, itching, funky odor, pain, or redness, it is considered normal. Types of white vaginal discharge Clear white discharge Clear white discharge represents normal discharge. This discharge is not accompanied by other symptoms, like itching, burning, and irritation. Clear and stretchy white discharge means that you are most likely ovulating. Creamy white discharge If odorless creamy white discharge is observed, it is perfectly normal a few days before your period. It can also be an indication of ovulation when the creamy white discharge starts to be stretchy and thick.  Milky white discharge Thick and milky white vaginal discharge may be a sign of early pregnancy. This milky white discharge during early pregnancy is called leukorrhea; it occurs due to elevating and varying estrogen levels. Itchy white discharge A bit of white discharge at the start and the end of your periods is normal. However, if you experience thick white clumpy discharge like wet toilet paper, it may cause itching and is indicative of a yeast infection. Itchy white discharge due to yeast infection is caused by the overgrowth of yeast or fungus in the vagina.  Roughly 75% of women experience at least one episode of the yeast infection at some point in their life. This type of discharge needs treatment. What causes white vaginal discharge? Vaginal discharge is important for the female reproductive system. White and thick vaginal discharge is often called infertile cervical mucus.  This type of mucus is seen when you are infertile – a time between ovulation and the beginning of your period. As long as this discharge is not accompanied by symptoms like pain, redness, and itching, it is absolutely normal. Possible causes for white discharge before your monthly period include: Normal reproductive system functioning Birth control. Birth control to prevent pregnancy alters the hormone levels, that can lead to elevated white discharge. These normal white discharge symptoms are the normal side effect of hormonal birth control. Pregnancy. Discharge from pregnancy is usually thicker and creamier than the “normal” white discharge. Different types of vaginal discharges are categorized based on their color and consistency. Some vaginal discharges are normal. Others which are chunky in consistency, foul smelling and green and yellow in color indicate an underlying condition that needs attention and immediate treatment. content source

Vaginal Discharge colors and their meaning

It is normal to have discharge at various stages of the menstrual cycle and during pregnancy. Healthy vaginal discharge, also called leukorrhea, is thin and clear or white and has only a mild odor. The volume of discharge increases throughout pregnancy to reduce the risk of vaginal and uterine infections. Discharge is at its most heavy in the final weeks of pregnancy, when it may contain pink mucus. The mucus is typically sticky and jelly-like in consistency, and it indicates that the body is preparing for labor. Discharge colors and their meaning The various colors of vaginal discharge may indicate different health issues. These include: Clear or milky white This color suggests leukorrhea, which is usually a normal and healthy discharge, especially if it smells mild. However, any changes in its quantity or consistency may suggest an issue. A woman who is pregnant but not yet at full term should see a doctor if she experiences an increase in clear discharge that leaks continuously or becomes thick and jelly-like. These changes may suggest preterm labor. White and lumpy Vaginal discharge that is lumpy and either white or off-white, resembling cottage cheese, can indicate a yeast infection. Yeast infections are common, and the body is particularly susceptible to them during pregnancy. Other symptoms include itching, burning, and painful urination or intercourse. Green or yellow Green or yellow vaginal discharge is not healthy and suggests a sexually transmitted infection (STI), such as chlamydia or trichomoniasis. Other possible symptoms include redness or irritation in the genitals. STIs sometimes do not cause any symptoms. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), STIs can cause complications during pregnancy that can affect both the woman and child. These complications sometimes do not present until years after the birth, but they can affect the nervous system and development of the child and cause infertility in the woman. People may occasionally think that they have yellow discharge when they are merely leaking small amounts of urine. Gray Gray vaginal discharge may indicate a vaginal infection called bacterial vaginosis (BV), particularly if it also has a fishy smell that becomes stronger following intercourse. BV is the result of a bacterial imbalance in the vagina. Douching and having multiple sexual partners are risk factors for BV, which is the most common vaginal infection during childbearing years. Brown Discharge is usually brown due to old blood leaving the body, which can be an early symptom of pregnancy. Brown discharge during pregnancy is not generally a cause for concern. However, pregnant women who experience dark brown discharge should contact their doctor. Pink Pink discharge during pregnancy may or may not be normal. Discharge with a pink hue often occurs during early pregnancy or in the final weeks as the body prepares for labor. It can also occur before a miscarriage or during an ectopic pregnancy. A study with 4,510 participants found that spotting and light episodes of bleeding during the first trimester, especially those persisting for just 1 to 2 days, did not correspond with a higher risk of miscarriage. Other causes of light spotting during pregnancy include sexual intercourse and vaginal infections. Red Red vaginal discharge during pregnancy requires the immediate attention of a doctor, especially if the bleeding is heavy, contains clots, or occurs alongside cramping and abdominal pain. These symptoms suggest miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy. Approximately 10 to 15 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage, which people may also refer to as pregnancy loss. Other causes of red discharge may be less serious, especially during the first trimester, when it may result from implantation or infection. Studies indicate that between 7 and 24 percent of women bleed during early pregnancy. Bleeding later in pregnancy can indicate potentially serious issues or preterm labor, which will require immediate medical attention. content source

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)- an overview

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder common among women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS may have infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods or excess male hormone (androgen) levels. The ovaries may develop numerous small collections of fluid (follicles) and fail to regularly release eggs. The exact cause of PCOS is unknown. Early diagnosis and treatment along with weight loss may reduce the risk of long-term complications such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of PCOS often develop around the time of the first menstrual period during puberty. Sometimes PCOS develops later, for example, in response to substantial weight gain. Signs and symptoms of PCOS vary. A diagnosis of PCOS is made when you experience at least two of these signs: Irregular periods. Infrequent, irregular or prolonged menstrual cycles are the most common sign of PCOS. For example, you might have fewer than nine periods a year, more than 35 days between periods and abnormally heavy periods. Excess androgen. Elevated levels of male hormone may result in physical signs, such as excess facial and body hair (hirsutism), and occasionally severe acne and male-pattern baldness. Polycystic ovaries. Your ovaries might be enlarged and contain follicles that surround the eggs. As a result, the ovaries might fail to function regularly. PCOS signs and symptoms are typically more severe if you're obese. When to see a doctor See your doctor if you have concerns about your menstrual periods, if you're experiencing infertility or if you have signs of excess androgen such as worsening hirsutism, acne and male-pattern baldness. Causes The exact cause of PCOS isn't known. Factors that might play a role include: Excess insulin. Insulin is the hormone produced in the pancreas that allows cells to use sugar, your body's primary energy supply. If your cells become resistant to the action of insulin, then your blood sugar levels can rise and your body might produce more insulin. Excess insulin might increase androgen production, causing difficulty with ovulation. Low-grade inflammation. This term is used to describe white blood cells' production of substances to fight infection. Research has shown that women with PCOS have a type of low-grade inflammation that stimulates polycystic ovaries to produce androgens, which can lead to heart and blood vessel problems. Heredity. Research suggests that certain genes might be linked to PCOS. Excess androgen. The ovaries produce abnormally high levels of androgen, resulting in hirsutism and acne. Complications Complications of PCOS can include: Infertility Gestational diabetes or pregnancy-induced high blood pressure Miscarriage or premature birth Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis — a severe liver inflammation caused by fat accumulation in the liver Metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that significantly increase your risk of cardiovascular disease Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes Sleep apnea Depression, anxiety and eating disorders Abnormal uterine bleeding Cancer of the uterine lining (endometrial cancer) Obesity is associated with PCOS and can worsen complications of the disorder. content source

1 Saves