Lifestyle

A woman's health is essential to the good health of her baby. Women who eat well and exercise regularly along with regular prenatal care are less likely to have complications during pregnancy. They're also more likely to successfully give birth to a healthy baby

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Effect of overusing a mobile in pregnancy

The usage of cell phones has increased more than a call in the past decade. As phones nowadays function as a mini-computer, music system, and a gaming system. A single portable gadget obviously increases its general usage as well as the radiation. Overusing a cell phone in pregnancy may affect you and your baby in the following ways: Long-term use of mobile during pregnancy may increase the risk of children manifesting behavioral problems like hyperactivity in their childhood. Pregnant women using mobile phones for long durations are more likely to bear kids with behavioral and emotional problems. Some studies propose that lengthy exposure to mobile radiation during pregnancy can alter the gene sequence in the mitochondria of the expectant mom which may travel to the baby, affecting his DNA and lead to the development of degenerative illnesses in the child. The higher rate of exposure to radiation during pregnancy can also change the brain activity of a pregnant woman causing fatigue, anxiety, reduced memory, and sleep disturbances. Constant and continued exposure to radio waves during pregnancy can even interfere with the cellular receptors of the human body and may initiate a force of uncontrolled consequences possibly increasing the risk of cancer. However, further research is needed on this. content source Featured Image Source

Beauty Ingredients To Be Avoided During Pregnancy

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10 Beauty Tips To Follow During Pregnancy

Top 10 Face Masks During Pregnancy

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5 Safe Beauty Treatments during Pregnancy (4 To Avoid)

When you are pregnant – you want to assure that the baby inside is healthy, but along with that, you also want to look beautiful. Today, we will tell you the Do's and Don'ts to look beautiful. 4 things to avoid: Don’t raise your core body temperature above 102.2 degrees Fahrenheit. Research has determined this is the maximum temperature you should reach in order to keep both you and your baby healthy. Don’t use any harsh chemicals directly on your skin. If it touches your skin, it can be absorbed into your bloodstream, and your baby depends on that blood. If there are going to be harsh chemicals in the room, make sure that the room is well ventilated. Always tell the professional serving you that you’re pregnant before the treatment. 5 treatments that you can indulge in: Your daily beauty routine:- Generally speaking, your everyday hair, makeup, and bathing rituals are perfectly fine. Massages:- A massage is a perfect way to rid you of those pregnancy aches and pains and to help you to relax and forget the stresses of impending motherhood. Of course, you should make sure that your masseuse is a certified prenatal therapist.  Facials:- Try to get an all-natural facial if possible. Also, be careful about getting a facial with retinoids, which should never be used during pregnancy. Also, keep in mind that your skin is likely more sensitive during pregnancy. You may want to ask whoever is doing your facial to test the product on your skin before starting. Manicures and pedicures:- This is conditional upon not being in a poorly ventilated, smelly room filled with dangerous chemicals, of course. There is also an increased risk of infection, so be sure they properly clean all tools.  Highlights:- While coloring the hair is a topic of debate, highlights are fine as long as the chemicals don’t come in contact with your scalp. So, who said one can’t look and indulge in beauty treatments when pregnant! Follow the above and find yourself glowing more than usual. Content Source Featured Image Source

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Maternity fashion: How to dress for your trimester

When it comes to dressing during pregnancy, comfort and style are key. But what feels right in week 9 may feel downright wrong by week 14. And what perfectly flatters your curves during the second trimester may become rather indecent by the tail end of your pregnancy. First Trimester Mum's the word The challenge: Keeping your pregnancy under wraps. Many people don't want to divulge their growing secret until at least the second trimester. What to do: Go into your closet and put aside anything that's too tight or clingy. Stick with silhouettes that flow over belly, hips, and thighs that can camouflage the few pounds you may gain in the first months. Wear soft knits, A-line skirts, Empire-waisted tops and frocks, wrap shirts and dresses. Another great piece for the first trimester: a "blouson" style top – that is, one that has a fitted waistband at the bottom but some roominess above the band. The fabric falls loosely over your belly while the fitted waistband keeps the look more tailored, less muumuu. Throw on a pair of boot-cut stretch jeans for a comfortable, pulled-together look. Not ready for maternity wear The challenge: Most maternity clothes have too much fabric for your barely there bump, but you've grown enough in other places that your pre-pregnancy clothes just don't fit. What to do: Stretch your wardrobe with a couple of key additions. Buy one of those stretchy bands (i.e., a Belly Band) that you can place at the top of your jeans, over the waistband that will no longer button or zip. The band will keep your pants up, and no one will know they're unbuttoned. In a pinch, you can also use a rubber band looped over the button and through the buttonhole to do the same thing, minus the smoothing effect of the band. Stock up on layering tanks. Wear them under tops that no longer button all the way. Throw one or two on under an oversize cardigan or blazer. The dumpy dilemma The challenge: You're worried about looking like you've simply let yourself go. No cute bump yet, just an overall thickening. What to do: Steer clear of too tight, loaded-with-Lycra clothes. While these curve- hugging tops will show off your bump later, right now you'll feel too much like a sausage in a tight casing. Avoid tops that are too billowy and tent-like, as well. Look for ones that flow gracefully over the extra pounds beneath while still having a bit of shape. Tunics are a great choice.  While fitted across the shoulders and arms, a tunic flows gracefully across the middle, disguising extra weight. An exception to the anti-cling rule: tank tops and other garments with built-in shaping panels, which can help smooth out the sudden pooch or contain your growing breasts. Top these tanks with a body-skimming top or cardigan made of a smooth jersey fabric. Second Trimester On a budget The challenge: You feel like every few weeks you're a new size and don't want to blow your budget on new clothes every month. What to do: Invest in a few items that will grow with you. Look for pieces that have details like ruching, tie-backs, buttons or gathering at the sides, and wraps, which will all let you adjust your clothing as your body grows and changes. What's more, they will let you flatteringly flaunt your bump, which usually pops out during this time. Busting out The challenge: Your boobs are busting out all over. What to do: If you haven't already, now's the time to invest in a few great bras. While you may choose to go for bigger sizes of your favorite bra, you might want to consider the comfort and expandability of maternity or nursing bras. Most women find that not only do their cups runneth over, but their band size (the circumference around your back) will grow too. Besides moving up a band size (or two), you can also find inexpensive bra extenders at most lingerie stores. From work to weekend The challenge: You need a few workhorse items that will go from work to weekend without sacrificing comfort. What to do: Embrace the wrap dress. Or rather, let the wrap dress – in a sleek solid color or a color-blocked pattern – embrace your curves. You'll look perfectly pulled together for the office and be comfortable and stylish for running weekend errands.  As your bump gets bigger and higher, simply change where you place the tie, eventually making the frock into an Empire-waisted garment, giving much-needed definition between bosom and belly. Another faithful, versatile item to choose: a pair of dark denim maternity boot-cut jeans with the stretchy fabric built right into the waistband. The cut and color will flatter you throughout the entire pregnancy and work for almost any work or social situation. Third Trimester Laboring through the last months The challenge: You feel huge and uncomfortable. Buttons, zippers, and even waistbands are increasingly torturous. What to do: Try an Empire-waisted maxi dress – an ankle-length flowing knit dress that you can wear even after the baby has arrived. Added benefit: it's so easy – throw it on and you're good to go! Pair a tunic in a comfy knit fabric over maternity leggings. You'll feel comfy and stylish. A case of the doldrums The challenge: You've embraced the monochromatic look (blacks, grays, etc.) because it's slimming and easy – but you want to add a bit more oomph to your look. What to do: Match your accessories to the bravado of your bump! As your belly grows, swap out the demure studs for a bigger, bolder earring. Add a scarf that has a bold, funky pattern. Don't be afraid to add a little drama to your look – have fun dressing around your belly! Try an animal-print bag, a thick stack of skinny gold bracelets, or a bright chunky necklace and matching cocktail ring. The homestretch The challenge: You're getting bored with your clothes, but it's the last leg of your pregnancy and you don't want to buy more. What to do: Give your wardrobe a boost with something you can wear later and that will punch up any outfit you're currently sick of: shoes! Whether you choose a ballet-style flat or a mule with a sliver of a kitten heel, you'll slip in and step out in style and comfort. Plus, no laces or buckles mean no bending over your burgeoning belly. Look for a pair in a fabulous animal print or bold color to snap you out of your wardrobe woes. Choose shoes that have a slightly pointy toe instead of a rounded one, which can make your legs look shorter. Feature Image Source  

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7 reasons why you can't get sleep at night

One of the best things you can do to manage insomnia while you’re pregnant is to have a good sleep routine. Begin by trying to go to bed at the same time every night. Start your routine with something relaxing to help you unwind.  Avoid screen time at least an hour before bed. Blue light from the TV, your mobile phone, or tablet can have an impact on your body’s circadian rhythm. Try reading a book instead. Taking a soothing bath might also make you sleepy. Just be careful that the temperature isn’t too hot — that can be dangerous for your developing baby. This is especially true during early pregnancy. Being pregnant is the best phase of your life, this is the common term everyone says, but no one tells you about the challenges. There are also a lot of sleepless nights that a woman has to face. As, the reasons can vary as per your body but the most common ones are discussed below: Frequent visit to the bathroom: Holding a life inside you is not easy. As you eat you eat for two, similarly as you drink your water intake also increases. The more you drink the more you want to pee. Your bathroom visits can make you stay up during nights. Indigestion: The hormones play a major role in here, increase in hormones can lead to indigestion. Avoid eating spicy food and opting for a healthy diet can be of help here. On the other hand, avoid eating two hours before going to bed can be of help. Baby’s movement: Baby’s like to move in the womb when mothers are lying still. Movement in the rib cage is uncomfortable for mothers and can make you stay up for all time.   Even if you are not able to sleep after adequate efforts, see your doctor and get help rightaway. Feature Image Source

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Do's and Dont's of Exercising During Pregnancy

Mobile usage during pregnancy

Pregnancy is the time when a woman needs to observe extra safety measures to ensure the well being of her child as well as herself. By now you must be well aware of why you should eat healthy foods and give up junk food during pregnancy, but do you know that little things that form a part of your daily life can also harm your pregnancy? Radiation from a mobile phone, computers, and wireless routers can also affect your pregnancy. A pregnant woman is exposed to various environmental influences that may be tough to pinpoint one thing that may affect her pregnancy. The use of electronic devices emitting radiation, like WIFI routers and smartphones, has remarkably increased in recent times. This implies that a pregnant woman may be exposed to enormous quantities of radiation even if she is not using a mobile phone. Does mobile usage really affect your pregnancy? However, researchers advocate that mobile phones emit radio waves, a type of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation, which is not likely to affect the health of the mother or of the growing fetus. Though some studies suggest that long-term use of a mobile phone can trigger insomnia, reduced bone density, and brain also. But exposure to lower and limited levels of mobile radiation may not be harmful to your health. Therefore it makes sense to limit your exposure to a cell phone during pregnancy by curtailing the usage time. These emissions are low levels of energy waves that may not infiltrate deep into the human tissues but can harm your eyes. Mobile phones are usually rated based on the frequency of radiation it emits. This rating is known as SAR (specific absorption rate) value, which informs you about the maximum quantity of radiation your body may absorb when using a mobile. The SAR of different phones may vary as per the model and brand. The higher a mobile phone’s SAR value, the more is the radiation absorbed by the person using that phone. Using a mobile continuously during pregnancy can expose you to greater radiation absorption which may interfere with your brain activities causing disruptions in sleep patterns, fatigue, or decreased memory. Numerous studies have been conducted to ascertain if mobile phone usage poses a serious health risk. But till date, no study has established any adverse health effects from using mobile phones for less time. However, when you are pregnant, it is best to be overcautious than to be sorry in the future. content source

Why is pubic hair shaved before the delivery?

  Some say you should, and some say you shouldn’t. You are left confused whether or not you should shave your pubic hair before delivery. Before you enter the labor room, you, usually, go through perineal hair shaving. It could be annoying and might unleash a myriad of emotions.       Why Is Pubic Hair Shaved Before Delivery? In many hospitals, it is a practice to get pregnant women shave their pubic hair before delivery. Here are the reasons why it is done (1): To make your childbirth hygienic To rule out any chances of infection if an episiotomy (a cut made at the opening of the vagina to help a difficult delivery or to prevent tissue rupture during childbirth) is performed To make suturing easier Helpful in Caesarian deliveries Sometimes, the nurse or a helper at the hospital does the job for you but it could be embarrassing to get it done by a stranger. If you want to be clean-shaven for your labor, then you may want to get it done in advance. When Should You Shave? Experts say that you should not shave or wax seven days before your scheduled delivery – be it a normal or Caesarean. This is primarily to avoid infections on the little cuts in your skin, which could attract bacteria (2). Shaving pubic hair has been a highly debatable topic. While a number of hospitals advice mothers-to-be to shave, researchers are against it. You may make an informed decision after weighing the pros and cons of pubic shaving. What Are The Benefits And Risks Of Shaving Pubic Hair During Pregnancy? This information might help you decide whether or not to shave your pubic hair: Benefits: Pubic hair is an ideal place for microbe infestation. This makes it necessary to keep the area clean to keep any infections at bay. It stops infections from reaching your baby. As the microbes tend to thrive in the pubic hair, it can get transferred to the baby causing infections. A clean-shaven pubic area provides a better view to the gynecologist if she wants to make any interventions, su4 Rech as using forceps, during your vaginal birth. Trimming or shaving of the pubic hair reduces sweating and keeps the area clean. It is convenient to have a shaved area so that the excessive bleeding post-delivery does not stick to the hair and make it difficult to wash. Risks: If hygiene is not maintained while shaving, it may lead to infections. You must use sterilized or disposable tools for the purpose. The regrowth of hair can cause discomfort due to the itching sensation. If not shaved properly, it can lead to ingrown hair, wherein the hair starts growing inside the skin causing painful bumps. The more practical problem with shaving while pregnant is you need to take somebody’s help because your bump blocks your view of the pubic area. If you are still unable to decide on what to do with your pubic hair, then seek help to clear your concerns.   Concerned About Shaving Pubic Hair Before Delivery? Do this: Consult your doctor and discuss your concerns. This will help you decide. Talk with your friends or close family members who have shaved/ not shaved during their labor. This may help change your views about this procedure. If you decide to go ahead with shaving, then do not hesitate to take help from your partner. But make sure you are opting for a safe method.   How To Remove Pubic Hair During Pregnancy? Here are various ways you can shave your pubic hair: Waxing and sugaring is a method wherein heated syrup is spread over the skin and lifted off to remove the hair. With the growing belly, it becomes difficult for you to bend and do the shaving. Therefore, get it done in a saloon where an expert can safely carry out the procedure for you. You may use hair removal creams as long as your skin is not sensitive towards them, and you have used them earlier. Chemical substances in the creams break down the hair follicle cells and dissolve it, facilitating easy removal of hair from the pubic area. You can also use electric shavers for a quick shaving of pubic hair. You may use it throughout your pregnancy.   Important Tips To Remember If you are removing the pubic hair by yourself: Use your fingers to feel and locate the area while going down and shave off the hair using a hair removal cream. Get into a bathtub and lay on your back. This position could help you see and shave the region. Place a fogless mirror on the wall or the floor such that you can see and angle yourself properly. It helps to guide you while shaving. If a nurse is shaving your pubic hair just before your delivery, then here is what you can do to avoid any anxiety: Do not get embarrassed while your nurse or midwife is carrying out this procedure because it is a standard procedure followed in almost all the hospitals and the midwives are used to it.   Make sure that the person uses a new razor pack. The packet should be opened in front of you. If it is hurting you, let your midwife know about it. This is important because any cuts or nicks can lead to infection. Do not panic as this is a routine carried out both during Cesarean and vaginal birth.   If you are against pubic hair shaving then let the hospital know about it. Tell your doctor why you do not want a shave, and listen to what she says. Shaving or not shaving pubic hair is a personal choice and depends on your hygiene habits. As there are studies that are for and against shaving, you might want to go by what your doctor says. Featured Image Source      

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These popular 20 games will boost development of your baby

Your baby's attention span will vary a lot, depending on his age, his temperament, and his mood. Sometimes he'll enjoy a game for as long as 20 minutes, but more often you'll need to modify the game every five minutes or so. You'll know your baby's loving your antics when he's turning toward you, smiling, or laughing. But if he squirms away from you, looks away, or cries, it's time to change the activity. Not every baby will catch on to every game. Don't allow this to freak you out, but of course if you have concerns about a possible developmental delay, talk to your baby's doctor. Birth to 3 months To the outside observer, a newborn basically seems like a pooping ball of protoplasm. Your baby will mostly just lie there, except when he's crying. So how can you connect with him and have fun? Your best chance of doing this is to engage your baby's senses: touch, sight (remember, your baby is still very nearsighted), smell, and hearing. (Let's leave taste out for now.) By the end of his first three months, your baby may reach out and try to grab things and will be fascinated by sounds, smells, and patterns. Note: It may take your newborn several seconds to respond to you or he may not respond much at all. Be patient – you may need to keep trying or wait a while for him to enter an alert, responsive state. 10 games your baby will love: Newborn to 3 months old Newborns constantly take in new sights, sounds, smells, and more. Help your baby learn about the world by trying these 10 fun games. Dance, Dance Revolution In the afternoons when my own baby got grumpy, nothing worked as well as dancing with her. I'd put on some music – she preferred soulful tunes from Stevie Wonder and James Brown – and either put her in the sling or hold her in my arms. At first she preferred soft swaying. Later on she liked me to swing her in the air or bump her up and down rather rudely. (Just be sure to offer neck support and don't shake your baby.) When your arms get tired, put your baby down and keep up the dance. Silly exaggerated movements like jazz hands or shaking your butt are particularly funny to babies. Close the drapes so the neighbors won't see. Let's Look at Stuff Most of your early playtime will be spent showing your baby stuff. Any object in the house that won't poison, electrocute, or otherwise hurt him is fair game. Babies love egg beaters, spoons, wire whisks, spatulas, books and magazines with pictures, bottles of shampoo or conditioner (don't leave your baby alone with these!), record albums, colorful fabrics or clothes, fruits and vegetables, and so on. Keep a little stash of objects beside you and sit with your baby. When the moment's right, whip something out like a magician. "Look, Kyle, Daddy's bicycle bell." Hold the object still about a foot from his face and stare at it yourself. Hey, now that you look at it, that bicycle bell is kind of interesting. Congratulations! You're thinking like a baby! Oh, and don't expect babies to really "get" books at this age. You'll know they're enjoying them by their way of getting still and watchful when you bring a favorite book out. Babies don't tend to sit through a whole story, though, and when they're a few months older they'll grab the books from you and close them. This is all developmental stuff. Babies love looking at books and cuddling close to you, but they usually don't care about the plot. Journey Into Mom's Closet You haven't spent a lifetime accumulating a closetful of bright, slinky, tactile clothing for nothing. Dig into your closet and show your baby your cashmere sweater, your cottony-soft favorite jeans, your brilliant plaid skirt. Run soft or silky fabrics over her face, hands, and feet. Lay fuzzy stuff down on the floor and put your baby on top of it. In a few months, your baby will want to run her hands over anything beaded, embroidered, or otherwise embellished. But for now, she may just be content to gaze in wonder. Hey! What's Over My Head? You'll be amazed at how much fun you can have with the simplest stuff around your house. Here are three ideas to start you off: Tie or tape some ribbons, fabric, or other interesting streamers onto a wooden spoon and dangle them gently over and in front of your baby's face. Take a floaty scarf and fling it into the air, letting it settle on your baby's head. Tie a toy to an elastic string (like the kind used for cat toys) and bounce it up and down in front of your baby's face, saying "Boing! Boing!" every time it descends. Remember, never leave your baby alone with strings or ribbons that could encircle his neck or that he could get into his mouth. The Diva Within You may have a terrible voice – but your kid doesn't know it! Now's the time to sing at volume 10, so set free that opera voice inside you. Your baby may like absolutely anything you sing, but there are some classics you should know. "Itsy Bitsy Spider" was the only song that made my baby stop crying when she was on a jag. And most kids like any song with movements – "The Wheels on the Bus," "Row, Row, Row Your Boat," "Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes," and "Patty-Cake," to name a few. (If you don't remember the words to a favorite song, just look online.) You may feel silly at first, but as your child gets into it, so will you. Try adding your baby's name to the song: "Old Mac Ethan had a farm," "Kate is my sunshine, my only sunshine," and so on. Try songs with silly sounds or animal noises in them, like "Witch Doctor" or "How Much Is That Doggie in the Window?" Try singing a song in a low growly voice and then in a high squeaky voice, to see which gets the most reaction. Try singing the song breathily into your baby's ear, or use a hand puppet (or a napkin or sock willing to play the part of a hand puppet). And get used to singing, because this could begin to eat up a significant portion of your day. 4 to 6 months At this age, your baby will become a lot more physical, learning how to roll over and even sit up. She can now hold, handle, and mouth objects, and she'll spend a good part of her busy days doing so (meaning extra vigilance is needed on your part). Games can get more physical now. Your baby might enjoy knee rides or tickle games. She's also more responsive to you, making noises and meeting your eyes. Smell the Spice Rack You're in the kitchen, trying to throw some kind of dinner together when your baby starts wailing. Take him over to the spice rack and introduce him to the intoxicating scent of cinnamon. Rub some on your hand and put it up to your baby's nose. (Don't let it get in his eyes or mouth.) If he likes it, try others: Vanilla, peppermint, cumin, cloves, nutmeg, and many other herbs and spices have intriguing fragrances that your baby might love. Other household goods are fragrant, too: Dad's shaving lotion, Mom's hand cream. Sniff out everything yummy – just be careful not to let your baby eat it! 10 games your baby will love: 4 to 6 months old Now that your baby is more alert, make him smile with these 10 fun games that are perfect for bonding and developing new skills. Bubbles, Bubbles Everywhere There's something magical about bubbles, and at this point your baby can see far enough away to focus on them. Blow bubbles when she's getting fussy waiting for the bus and watch the tears dry up. Blow bubbles in the park to attract older kids who'll caper nearby and entertain your baby in the process. Blow bubbles in the bathtub or out on the porch when it's late afternoon and your baby is cranky. Bubbles are unbelievably cheap, easily transportable, and endlessly fascinating for babies. I'm Gonna Get You! Your baby is old enough to have a sense of anticipation now. And no baby can resist your coming at him mock-menacingly with a threat of hugs, kisses, or tickles. Here's what you could say: "Hey, Sweetpea! I see you over there sitting up! Well, that just makes you closer to my lips and I'm going to come over there and kiss you! I'm going to steal a kiss, baby! I'm coming! I'm coming! I... gotcha!" Then cover your baby in smooches. In our house we threaten to eat the baby and punctuate our advances with lip chomps on her fat little feet. A delicacy! When your baby's older you can modify this game to include a chase around the house – this works wonderfully as a way to get your child out the door when you're in a rush. This Little Piggy Touch your baby's toes in turn, starting with the big toe. Say, "This little piggy went to market, this little piggy stayed home, this little piggy had roast beef, this little piggy had none. And this little piggy went wee-wee-wee all the way home." As you say that last part, run your fingers up your baby's belly. This game is useful for putting on socks and shoes or distracting your baby during diaper changes. You can also play this game in the bathtub with a squirt bottle targeting your baby's toes. Find two perfect, development-boosting activities for every week of your baby's first year. Tummy Time It's important to have your baby spend time on her tummy, even if she protests vociferously. Get down on the floor with your baby. Look her in the eye as you lie on your own belly. Lay your baby down on a towel and use it to gently roll her from side to side. Try saying, "Oops-a-daisy, Oops-a-daisy" as you roll her. Fly, Baby, Fly! Now that your baby can hold his head up, it's time to hoist him into the air. You can play that he's a rocket ship, flying him over you and making realistic rocket noises. You can play that your baby is in an elevator, which advances up floor by floor before sinking quickly to the bottom (my husband likes to bump noses with our baby and say "Ding!" at this point). Or pretend that your baby's doing a helicopter traffic report. 7 to 9 months Your baby's becoming an expert at sitting and may soon be crawling as well. Encourage these physical feats by celebrating each new milestone with claps and a cheer: "Yay, you sat up! Amazing baby!" The ability to transfer objects from hand to hand and the fabled pincer grasp are part of your baby's increasing hand control (which means you'll be forced to carry a container of O-shaped cereal with you at all times for the next year). Your baby also begins to understand that when an object moves out of sight, it hasn't disappeared from the face of the earth. This discovery makes games like peek-a-boo a favorite. Touch It, Hold It, Bang It If your baby has one object, she'll bang it on the table. If she has two objects, she'll bang them together, hold them up to the light, squint at them, bang them separately on the table, hit the table with both at the same time, see if the object sounds different when hit using the left hand rather than the right hand, and on and on. Help her out by handing over objects that make interesting sounds: hollow containers, metal spoons, bells. Pay attention to tactile sensations as well: Your baby will be fascinated by an embossed greeting card or the slickness of Mom's enameled jewelry box. A baby with strands of cooked spaghetti to play with will be thoroughly entranced. I Can Control the World Babies love cause and effect at this age, as in: I do this, the light comes on. I do that, the light goes off. Showing your baby how to work light switches, faucets, doorbells, and more will thrill him – but can make life more difficult for you when he insists on being held up to work the lights yet again. Instead, you may want to offer a other dangers (dressers with drawers pulled out can turn over on a child) and then let your baby go to town. Obstacle Course If your baby's crawling, scooting, or walking, she may enjoy the challenge of having to move over things. (This is great for developing her motor skills, too. Pillows, tired parents, and laundry make good obstacles. Sleeping cats do not. So Many Variations on Peek-a-boo The classic: Hold up a towel between your face and your baby's and ask, "Where's Sam? There's Sam!" over and over again. You can vary this game in a million ways. Hide behind a door and make your baby push it open to see you. Hide behind a chair and pop out first from above then from the sides. Go behind a corner with another person and alternate who jumps out and yells "Boo!" Keep a selection of hats behind the couch and pop up wearing a different one each time. A surefire laugh-getter is to put a hat on your head, low enough to cover your eyes, and let your baby take it off, saying "Oh!" in surprise each time he does it. (This will also guarantee that you'll never wear a hat in peace again.) Roll Play Babies are fascinated by balls and how they move. You'll get a big laugh by juggling or tossing balls up in the air and letting them hit the floor while you make a silly sound effect: "Whoops!" Roll a soft ball toward your baby and watch her grab and squeeze it. Eventually, with encouragement, she'll roll the ball back toward you. And someday she'll be able to kick and toss the ball or drop it into a big bowl or bucket. For now, bounce and roll. 10 to 12 months Developmentally, your baby has suddenly morphed into an almost-toddler. Games that allow him to practice so-called gross motor skills such as standing, pulling up, and climbing are important for him now. Your baby will also like to work on his fine motor skills by fiddling with the tag on your shirt or the pages of a book – and maybe your breasts or bra if he's still nursing. Rearrange and Re-rearrange Your baby is figuring out the connections between objects in the world. She'll love to stack and arrange objects, as well as fill and empty them. Give your baby a box that's easy to open (like a shoe box) and show her how to put things inside and take them out. At our house, this game quickly evolves into "Take everything out of Mommy's purse and fling it wildly around the living room," which is why I no longer carry change or pens. Another way to play this game: Get a bunch of cups (maybe even stackable measuring cups – ooh, two toys in one!) and show your baby how to pour water, sand, or cornmeal from one to the other, or into a larger container. The Endless Cruise Once your baby is up on his feet, you can encourage cruising by placing a favorite toy at the far end of the couch or over on the coffee table. Try enticing your baby by putting one of your toys, such as your or sunglasses, a distance away and cruising on your knees toward it. Your baby may find this amusing and attempt to join you. Encourage your baby to push an object around the room. Push toys and large empty boxes work well. Avoid folding chairs, which can fold up unexpectedly. Top That Kid Babies this age love to imitate. Encourage this behavior by making a ridiculous noise and then nodding at your baby to go ahead and try a noise. She may imitate you or make her own noise, which you can imitate. Or you can make up a new noise of your own. You can also play this game with faces or movements – our kid likes to raise her arms in a V shape and wave them around. When we do it back, her expression is of someone witnessing magic. The Bath Is Fun No longer is your baby content to sit in the tub and be washed. Older babies want to stand up, splash, grab your hair, pat the shower curtain, and so on. (Note: Never leave a baby unattended in the bath, not even for a minute.) Encourage the fun by adding lots of toys to the tub. Plenty of stuff around the house can be endlessly filled, drained, poured from or into, and floated. Pile up some plastic cups, yogurt containers, funnels, and squeeze bottles, and bring them into the bath along with any of your baby's plastic toys. Poke holes in the top of a plastic bottle with a flat cap to make a homemade watering can. Let your baby feel the sensation of the water dripping onto him and show him how to cut off the flow by blocking it with his hand. Use your homemade toy to give his rubber ducky a shower. At the end of the bath, drain the toys in a plastic colander or a net bag suction-cupped to the side of the tub. Hopefully your baby is clean, happy, and ready to sleep. Wasn't that fun?

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Best 10 Babymoon Tips

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Top 5 Packing Tips For Your Babymoon

Some pointers to keep in mind before planning a Babymoon

Being pregnant is a happy and hectic time. Chances are you’ve been in overdrive lately running to doctor’s appointments, shopping for baby gear, stocking up the freezer. One antidote to the hubbub: a timely trip-for-two that’ll give you and your baby daddy a chance to catch your breath and do some serious couple bonding before your bundle arrives. Keep in mind some pointers! Timing Who wants to travel when they can barely keep down a bagel for breakfast? And who feels like hitting the road when they barely fit in the car? That’s why the sweet spot for a babymoon is during the second trimester (weeks 14 through 27) when you’re past the queasiest but not too big to get around easily. Reduce the stress Flying to your destination? Try to stick to nonstop flights (you really don’t want to be running for connections) and request an aisle seat so those (frequent) bathroom trips are easier to manage. Planning a road trip? Choose a babymoon spot within a reasonable driving radius (say four or five hours) and stop every hour to stretch your legs (and pee, of course). Think twice about a cruise since reaching your departure point may entail a couple of modes of transportation plus you run the risk of seasickness with no escape. Some downtime When picking your destination, go for a place that offers opportunities for serenity along with pregnancy-friendly activities. Obvious choices include a beachside resort or a B&B near a town with scrollable sights. A big city can also deliver the right balance if you snag some R&R while taking in a show or sitting and pondering paintings at a museum or people-watching on a bench in a park. Medical help available A medical emergency is a lot easier to deal with when there’s no language barrier, so book your babymoon in a country where almost everyone speaks English (or you’re fluent in its language). And no matter which country you choose, contact the hotels on your shortlist to find out what medical services are available. Make sure there is yummy food Before you book a stay, glance over the menus of nearby restaurants to make sure the chow sounds yummy, or at least isn’t filled with foods you can’t bear right now. If spicy stuff isn’t your friend these days, you’ll want options other than the local taqueria on your southwestern sojourn So, in the mood for traveling? Do keep the above points in mind to have a safe, fun and healthy journey. Happy pregnancy! Content Source

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