Language Skills

Language development is the process by which children come to understand and communicate language during early childhood

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Baby developmental milestones chart: 7 to 12 months

  Though you’ll find some specifics, like when babies sit up , “normal development” refers to these skills: Gross motor skills: using large groups of muscles, balancing, and changing position (sitting, standing, walking, etc.) Fine motor skills: using hands for smaller, more refined movements (playing, eating, etc.) Language skills: communicating via body language and understanding what others are saying Cognitive skills: more refined thinking skills, like reasoning and remembering Social skills: expressing feelings and responding to the feelings of others one in six children will have a developmental delay, but that doesn’t mean your baby will face long-term issues. Missing a few monthly milestones is not cause for panic. There are many factors that influence when infant milestones happen. In most cases, your baby just needs a little extra time. Babies born prematurely, for example, are more likely to hit each milestone counting from their due date, not their day of birth. Talk to your pediatrician if you have any concerns. 7 Month Baby Milestones In month 7, baby’s eyesight is improving, allowing for more coordination.  Transfering objects from one hand to another While your baby has explored objects by touch and mouth for months now, around month 7, baby will start transferring objects from from one hand to another, displaying spatial awareness. Improving vision Babies eye control and eye-body coordination becomes more refined. Improved depth perception allows babies to reach for toys and other objects. What’s more, babies’ color vision should be fairly strong by this age! 8 Month Baby Milestones In month 8, baby is on the move and better able to communicate with you.  Learning object permanence Their brains continue to amaze as they start to understand object permanence. This is the psychological phenomenon that helps folks understand that when something disappears from view, it doesn’t mean that it’s gone forever. (In other words, when mommy leaves the room, she will come back.) It may seem like small potatoes to grown adults, but think of the amazing intellectual leaps this takes for infants! Crawling The developmental milestone of crawling may not happen all at once or in a linear fashion—and some babies will only crawl for a short period of time. Others babies won’t crawl the way you’d expect to, crawling sideways or scooting their bottom along the floor. Crawling is very important—it not only strengthens baby’s muscles, but it also improves baby’s brain function. It’s tempting to hold baby up and try to teach them to walk—it’s such an exciting time—but a little bit of patience can really help baby. Experts saycrawling improves hand-eye coordination, plus improves comprehension, concentration, and memory.  Saying first words Your baby will be communicating now more than ever by the end of these months. She will be repeating sounds like “bababa” or, very adorably, “mamama.” (Though fair warning, mamas: Baby is likely to say Dada first.) Additionally, words start to carry meaning at this stage. You’ll find she understands simple words like, “no.” What’s more, she’ll begin to use her fingers to point, further associating movement with communication and comprehension. 9 Month Baby Milestones In month 9, baby’s brain is working hard—he/she is starting to use objects for their intended purpose.  Standing Babies should be able to stand holding on to your hands. You may even witness your baby pulling himself up. Improved dexterity Those jerky arm movements have long since disappeared. Babies are now able to wield objects more efficiently. Their improved dexterity might mean banging or shaking toys (or anything else they can get their hands on! Careful!)  This baby milestone also indicates increased cognitive function. You may notice baby beginning to use household objects for their intended purpose. For example, they may mimic drinking out of a cup (or actually do so!). This will also become apparent with pretend play, which should be just about starting. Look forward to baby pretending to talk on the phone and engaging in other imaginative play. 10 Month Baby Milestones In month 10, the fun really begins—baby understands and engages in simple games.  Cruising Baby may be walking while holding onto you or furniture. Playing interactive games By this point, babies can understand simple games (think peekaboo), find hidden objects, or take things in and out of a container. Encourage all of these behaviors! They will help develop those all important fine motor skills and every bit of playtime is also learning time. 11 Month Baby Milestones In month 11, you’ll notice baby’s flourishing personality and his/her desire to explore.  Starting to explore Baby will take all of those newfound gross motor skills like sitting, crawling, and cruising to start checking everything out. No cabinet or shelf is safe, my friends! Take steps to baby proof and make extra sure cleaning supplies, toiletries, and medicine cabinets are well off limits for baby. Better yet, work on getting any toxic junk out of your house! (See how to make natural cleaners for your home.) Developing their distinct personality Babies start to understand emotions better, reading and reacting to your emotional state. This level of communication and interaction deepens as they are able to use their bourgeoning vocabulary to state what they want and need. 12 Month Baby Milestones In month 12, baby’s brain has more than doubled in size! He/she is walking and talking.  Beginning to walk Here’s another developmental milestone you’ve been waiting for! Around 12 months, babies may begin to walk! They may still need a bit of help or support, but the pitter patter of those precious little feet are on the horizon. Improving language skills Watch out! At this stage, children should start repeating the words you say. They should already have a small vocabulary, and they will be practicing simple gestures like waving bye or shaking their head yes and no. Baby Milestones Chart Month   Milestones Month 1: Baby is getting acquainted with the outside world.     • Reacting to sights and sounds • Displaying reflexes Month 2: Baby’s development centers around his relationship with you and other caregivers.    • Paying attention to faces and recognizing people • Cooing • Smiling • Supporting their own head Month 3: Baby’s working on her coordination.    • Connecting sound, sight, and movement • Grasping objects Month 4: Baby’s cognitive, social, and motor skills start to develop at a rapid pace.     • Copying sounds, movements, and facial expressions • Rolling over • Babbling • Laughing Month 5: Baby’s becoming more expressive and preparing for crawling, pulling himself up, and walking.    • Smiling at the mirror • Expressing new emotions • Refining basic movements Month 6: Baby’s narrowing in on his communication and motor skills.    • Responding to their own name • Moving… a lot • Sitting Month 7: Baby’s eyesight is improving, allowing for more coordination.    • Transfering objects from one hand to another • Improving vision Month 8: Baby is on the move and better able to communicate with you.     • Learning object permanence • Crawling • Saying first words Month 9: Baby’s brain is working hard—he/she is starting to use objects for their intended purpose.     • Standing • Improved dexterity Month 10: The fun really begins—baby understands and engages in simple games.    • Cruising • Playing interactive games Month 11: You’ll notice baby’s flourishing personality and his/her desire to explore.     • Starting to explore • Developing their distinct personality Month 12: Baby’s brain has more than doubled in size! He/she is walking and talking.     • Beginning to walk • Improving language skills What to Do If Your Baby Isn’t Meeting Milestones All of baby’s firsts are important, but missing a few monthly milestones is usually not cause for panic. Your baby’s doctor will be watching for baby’s developmental milestones during each well child visit. If there’s any concern, the pediatrician may recommend a developmental assessment test to determine if any treatment or intervention is needed. If your doctor gives the all clear, but you still have concerns, get a second opinion. Remember: You know your child’s movements and patterns best. Even if it is just a nagging feeling, never be afraid to talk to your healthcare provider about any concerns. content source

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Growth spurts: What you need to know

From age 2 to 4, kids add about 2 to 3 inches in height per year and up to 4 pounds in weight. (From ages 1 to 3, growth takes place primarily in the legs and trunk.) Growth percentiles reveal your child's height and weight relative to other children of the same age and sex. For example, a child in the 75th percentile in height is taller than three-fourths of his peers. Growth is seldom steady and even. Instead, it tends to happen in spurts. Among the signs of a growth spurt in progress: Your child may seem hungrier than usual or eat more at a sitting. Your child may nap longer than usual or sleep longer at night. Your child may be crankier or clingier than usual even though he's not ill. It's probably a good idea not to put too much emphasis on growth spurts, however, in justifying behavioral changes over the long term. Typically, parents notice a child's growth spurt after it has already happened. You dress your child in the same pants he wore last week and they no longer reach his ankles, or his feet seem too big for his shoes. It's not uncommon for a young preschooler to grow two clothing sizes in a season. Responding to growth spurts You don't need to do much in response to a growth spurt, other than restock the closet. If your child seems to have a larger appetite than usual, feed her another serving at meals or provide more frequent snacks. Preschoolers often veer between "living on air" and vacuuming up food, depending on their body's needs. Let your child sleep longer for a few days if she seems to need it. What about growing pains? "Growing pains" – dull aches in the legs, especially around the calves, knees, and front of the thighs – are somewhat controversial and probably misnamed. No medical evidence links them to growing muscles or bones. It's possible, however, for growing muscles to feel tight and spasm after a lot of activity. As many as 25 to 40 percent of kids report this feeling, beginning around ages 3 to 5 (and then again in the tween years). Often the pain wakes a child up in the middle of the night. These pains tend to follow days of vigorous outside play. They can be treated with warm compresses, massage, gentle stretching, or acetaminophen. If the pain is severe or lasts more than 24 hours, report it to your child's doctor so he can rule out other causes, including juvenile arthritis, rheumatologic disorders, infection, fractures, and other orthopedic problems.   Content and Feature Image Source:

Baby Hearing Screening

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Language Delay: Types, Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

What is a language delay? A language delay is a type of communication disorder. Your child may have a language delay if they don’t meet the language developmental milestones for their age. Their language abilities may be developing at a slower rate than most children’s. They may have trouble expressing themselves or understanding others. Their delay may involve a combination of hearing, speech, and cognitive impairments. Language delays are quite common. According to the University of Michigan Health System, delayed speech or language development affects 5 to 10 percent of preschool-aged children. Types A language delay can be receptive, expressive, or a combination of both. A receptive language deficit happens when your child has difficulty understanding language. An expressive language disorder happens when your child has difficulty communicating verbally. Symptoms If your child has a language delay, they won’t reach language milestones at a typical age. Their specific symptoms and missed milestones depend on their age and the nature of their language delay. Common symptoms of a language delay include: • Not babbling by the age of 15 months • Not talking by the age of 2 years • An inability to speak in short sentences by the age of 3 years • Difficulty following directions • Poor pronunciation or articulation • Difficulty putting words together in a sentence • Leaving words out of a sentence Causes Language delays in children have many possible causes. In some instances, more than one factor contributes to a language delay. Some common causes include the following: • Hearing impairment: It’s common for children who have a hearing impairment to have a language impairment as well. If they can’t hear the language, learning to communicate can be difficult. • Autism: While not all children with autism have language delays, autism frequently affects communication. • Intellectual disability: A variety of intellectual disabilities can cause language delays. For instance, dyslexia and other learning disabilities lead to language delays in some cases. • Several psychosocial issues: These can cause language delays, as well. For example, severe neglect can lead to problems with language development. Risk factors for language delay Potential risk factors for speech and language problems include: • Being male • Being born prematurely • Having a low birth weight • Having a family history of speech or language problems • Having parents with lower levels of education How it’s diagnosed After conducting a thorough medical assessment, your child’s doctor will refer you to a speech-language pathologist. They will perform a comprehensive assessment of your child’s expressive and receptive language to determine if your child has a language delay. The exam will focus on various forms of verbal and non-verbal communication and use standardized and informal measures. After completing a speech and language evaluation, the language pathologist may recommend other exams. For example, a hearing exam can help them determine if your child has a hearing impairment. Your child may have hearing problems that have been overlooked, especially if they’re very young. Treatment After diagnosis, your child’s treatment plan will likely involve speech and language therapy. A licensed speech-language pathologist will complete an evaluation to determine the types of problems that your child is facing. This information will help them develop and implement a treatment plan. If your child has underlying health conditions, their doctor may recommend other treatments as well. For example, they may recommend an evaluation by a neuropsychologist. Tips for encouraging language development It may not be possible to prevent all language delays. Hearing impairment and learning disabilities may not always be preventable. Follow these tips to encourage language development in your child: • Talk to your child from the time they’re born. • Respond to your child’s babbling when they’re a baby. • Sing to your child, even when they’re a baby. • Read aloud to your child. • Answer your child’s questions. Content Source

Your 2 months old baby growth and development

All your efforts and hard work as a doting parent will begin to show during your baby’s second month. Your baby isn’t quite capable of providing you with feedback about how they are currently doing but this month can be a bit more rewarding. Expect more smiles and a lot of cooing as your baby becomes animated. You are sure to get a strong emotional connection than earlier as you revel in the joys of motherhood. Second Month Baby Milestones: Motor Skills Two-month-old babies are gaining more control over their bodies. That means they can hold their head a little steadier while lying on their tummies or being supported upright. In the second month of life, babies continue to have a strong sucking reflex. You may notice your baby likes to suck on a fist or a few fingers. This is one of the best ways babies have of comforting themselves. At 2 months, your baby doesn’t yet have the coordination to play with toys. But she may bat at a colorful object hanging in front of her. Your baby may even briefly hold a toy that you place in one of her hands. Second Month Baby Milestones: Sleep Your baby’s sleep patterns are evolving, but at two months, they still aren’t fully established. At this age, babies sleep 15 to 16 hours a day. But those hours are sporadic, and they usually aren’t ready to sleep through the night. This is especially true for breastfed babies, who generally wake up to eat every three hours or so. Hang in there for just a few more weeks and you’ll be able to get some much-needed rest. You may even be able to get to a full night’s sleep earlier by helping your baby learn how to fall asleep on her own. All babies need to be put to sleep on their backs to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). You can provide plenty of tummy time when your baby is awake and supervised. Also, remove all soft objects from baby’s crib, including pillows, blankets, stuffed animals, and soft bumpers. Second Month Baby Milestones: The Senses At two months, babies can see objects -- and people -- from up to 18 inches away. That means you still need to get pretty close, but your baby will be able to see your face pretty well while feeding. She should also be able to follow movements when you walk close by. Baby’s hearing is improving, too. Your 2-month-old will especially enjoy listening to the sound of your voice. Second Month Baby Milestones: Communication For a 2-month-old, most communication consists of crying. But you may hear a few gurgles, grunts, and even some sweet coos. Your baby should recognize your face and voice, and respond to them. You might even see the first adorable hint of a smile. One of the most important things you can do at this age is talk to your baby. Even though 2-month-old babies can’t talk back, they will respond to the sound of your voice, and it will encourage them to start forming their own first words in the coming months.     Content source Featured image source

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Games for newborn babies  

0-3 Month Old Games Motor Games and Activities Place baby on their tummy to play for a few minutes at a time, a few times a day Lie down and place baby tummy down on your chest so you’re face-to-face Hold baby’s hands and clap them together while you play music and sing Nestle baby close to you while you gently rock and sway Change the direction that baby sleeps to encourage head turning and build strength Sensory Games and Activities Hang a colorful mobile above baby’s crib to provide visual stimulation Gently touch and tickle baby to make them giggle Play with baby in a variety of positions Provide plenty of skin-to-skin contact with a parent or caregiver Smile at baby, touch her hands, feet and forehead. See how she wiggles, reacts to touch and voices Play or sing songs with baby to help enhance baby’s listening skills When changing baby’s diaper touch different body parts and say “beep” baby may begin watching your hand and anticipating touch. Hang a mirror on the wall. Tap the mirror and say baby’s name. Over time baby will begin to understand who the baby in the mirror is. Show baby family photos or flip through a magazine. Point out the smiling faces to baby Communication Games and Activities Speak in a high-pitched, sing-song voice to help get and keep baby’s attention while you talk Describe your actions as you dress, feed, and bathe your child. Talk about where you’re going and what you’re doing. Give baby frequent face-to-face time Shake a rattle up and down while singing to baby Show pictures of family and friends and point out smiling faces Hold up a doll or stuffed animal and point out the different body parts  Feeding Games and Activities   4-6 Month Old Games   Motor Games and Activities Place baby on their tummy to play in short spurts for up to an hour over the course of the day Place baby tummy down on a blanket and move the blanket slowly around the room Allow baby to explore age appropriate toys with their mouth and tongue (be sure that the toys are large enough so that baby does not risk choking) Encourage baby to practice repeated rolling from back to tummy. Place toys around to encourage pivoting Sensory Games and Activities Encourage baby to touch fabric with different textures such as wool, corduroy, and velvet Lift baby up and down and play in different positions to help develop their sense of movement and balance Find balls with different textures and colors. Teach baby how to roll, drop, and bounce them. Communication Games and Activities Play peek-a-boo Use a variety of facial expressions while you talk Read with baby. “Reading” can simply mean describing pictures without following the written words. Encourage two-way communication. When baby coos or babbles, be sure to respond and take turns in “conversation”. Play with rhymes and songs Encourage baby to play with toys that make sounds Feeding Games and Activities Collect a variety of scents (flowers, spices, cookies) and pass them under baby’s nose one at a time to see what kinds of smells they prefer 7-9 Month Old Games Motor Games and Activities Put a toy or book inside an empty cardboard box. Wrap it with colorful paper or newspaper comics. Clap your hands when baby yanks it open then announce what is inside. Encourage movement by placing toys around baby where they must move to reach them Encourage baby pushups during Tummy Time by raising and lowering a rattle over baby’s head Engage baby in activities like reading or playing with a ball while in sitting Gently push baby back and forth on a swing in the park, but make sure baby can sit up and hold head steady with no problem When baby is holding a toy in each hand offer a third toy; watch as baby figures out how to grasp the new toy without letting go of the other two Punch holes in lid of empty food container and fill with water to make a fun bath time toy Get an empty plastic bucket and have baby throw toys into it Use different household items , like squeeze toys or newspapers to make different noises for baby Sensory Games and Activities Use your hands to make shadow puppets for baby Gently touch baby on the feet and tummy to make them giggle Play with a jack in the box or windup toy with baby to show motion Use animal sounds when playing with or reading to baby; point out an image of an animal then associate the sound that animal makes with the picture Walk with baby in a carrier or baby backpack Play with baby in many different positions Take baby on a walk in a stroller or jogger Use slow, rocking motions for calming and more vigorous motions for play time Give baby space to explore environment, while staying close to supervise Introduce new textures while baby is eating, sleeping, dressing, or playing outdoors, use a variety of sponges, soaps, and lotions during bath time Provide plenty of skin-to-skin contact with a parent or caregiver Encourage baby to play on the floor with toys of various colors, sizes, and shapes Allow baby to grab and explore items within reach Communication Games and Activities Draw a picture of baby’s face and then point out the different parts Play with a pretend phone; talk into phone as you would a regular call, then offer it to baby to do the same Read short stories with baby Start using hand movements along with associated words to teach baby to communicate with gestures Describe your actions throughout the day as you dress, feed, and bathe baby. This gives baby an opportunity to listen to the sounds and rhythms of speech Respond to baby’s sounds and encourage two-way communication Play music throughout the day – lively, upbeat music during playtime, and quiet melodic music for naps and bedtime Read picture books together to help baby connect words and images Give baby frequent face time Point out objects while you walk and talk with baby Feeding Games and Activities Try introducing pureed foods to baby. Puree a small amount of whatever you are having for dinner in a food processor, but be sure to avoid honey, cow’s milk, salt, and artificial sweeteners Introduce new foods gradually and watch for baby’s response Do not force food or show stress over a baby’s dislike for certain foods Change the texture of food if baby refuses food Provide baby with a healthy diet – avoid artificial ingredients, sugars, and preservatives 10-12 Month Old Games Motor Games and Activities Get baby to stack toys such as blocks or rings and describe each toy as your baby picks it up Lie down on the floor and have baby crawl over you Practice new gestures with baby like blowing kisses, clapping hands, or giving a high five Use a toy to encourage baby to crawl when they are in a tummy time position Roll a soft ball across the floor and encourage baby to crawl after it Allow baby to play with toys they can push or pull across the floor Read with baby while they lie on their tummy Play with stackable blocks Let baby play with large objects like tunnels, pillows, or cushions while supervised If baby is already walking, let them try riding toys that they can sit on and scoot across the floor Provide push toys that allow baby to practice walking with some support Encourage baby to dance and sway to music Provide opportunities for baby to experience slow, rocking movements Sensory Games and Activities Play peek-a-boo with baby Have baby look at their reflection in the mirror and point out each body part Encourage baby to crawl over, under, and through various objects in your home Introduce baby to new textures through food, toys, clothes, sponges, etc. Provide plenty of skin-to-skin contact with caregivers Keep baby away from areas where people are smoking or using harsh chemicals Communication Games and Activities Practice waving bye-bye when a guest leaves your home Read daily from big, colorful books and let baby turn the pages Encourage baby to wave hello when meeting new people Ask baby to point to different body parts when you name them Ask baby questions and encourage response with words, baby sounds, cooing, or babbling. Record the conversation and play it back for baby to hear Direct baby’s attention to interesting objects by helping them point their finger Name textures, shapes, and sizes to help baby attach words to tactile experiences Describe your actions throughout the day as you dress, feed, and bathe baby Respond to baby’s sounds to encourage two-way communication Feeding Games and Activities Offer baby an assortment of food to try Keep track of where baby is in their feeding development, well meaning friends and family may give baby food inappropriate for their age  

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What can you expect your baby to be doing at four months old?

Your baby at four months old At four months old your baby's development will be speeding up. Along with improved senses, they will likely be going through the early stages of speech development and may even have the early signs of their first teeth.   Your baby’s senses at four months old Further development of their touch Your baby will be fascinated by anything with a texture now – crinkly, shiny, lumpy or furry. Most of the objects they touch, whatever their texture, will go straight in their mouth. Sometimes they will hit themselves in the face with the toy and cry, giving you a look as if to ask, ‘Why did you do that, Mum?’ What your baby can see Their vision has really come on since those first few fuzzy images at birth – your baby can now see across the room, although they will still prefer to look at things close-up. If you can see any squint, contact your health visitor as it’s important to get checked out. Although they can see colour from birth, your baby will now be much better at distinguishing between different shades, being able to more accurately work out the difference between similar shades. This can be a great time to introduce more colourful toys and books which they’ll love looking at. Your baby’s motor skills at four months old Speech development If you listen carefully to your baby’s babble you may be able to make out vowel and consonant sounds: p and b sounds when they’re unhappy and guttural sounds like j and k when they’re happy. They may also be able to imitate the sounds you make now, so if you say boo, they may try to say it back. Rolling on Rolling over is more likely now. The age at which babies first roll over varies – some are ready at three months, some not until six or seven months. So it may happen this month. Or it may not. You can’t force it but you can gently encourage it by putting a favourite toy by their side and see if they roll over to get it. You may also notice that whilst laying on their front, they’re able to arch their back. This is a good exercise that can help them develop their neck muscles further and is a good way for them to start developing the muscles they’ll need to sit up and eventually crawl, stand and walk.  

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Babycare tips for 6 month old baby

1. Your Baby’s Nutritional Needs One of the most important tips to take care of a six-month-old baby is your baby’s diet and nutrition. By six months your baby is all set for solid foods because by this age not only his body’s nutritional demands have increased, but his developing digestive system is ready for solid foods too. Also, breast milk lacks iron, and it is very important for your baby’s growth and thus giving fortified cereals to your baby will be a good idea. You can give pureed fruits to your baby too. However, milk will still be the main source of nutrition to your baby, and your baby may still be on the breast or formula milk till he turns one. But it will be a good idea to start giving sipper cup to your baby once in a while. 2. Your Baby’s Sleep Sleep is very important for healthy growth of your baby. Make sure your baby takes two to three naps in a day and sleeps for almost 10 hours at night. It is recommended that you follow a sleep-schedule for your baby and try to put your baby to sleep almost at the same time every day. Ensure there are no distractions in the room and you create a calm and peaceful environment for your baby. Babies at this age become quite aware of their surroundings and may get easily distracted. 3. Your Baby’s Developmental Milestones Your little one is very active by the time he turns six months. He is able to roll, sit with support, babble a few words and does various other things. Your baby may feel wary of strangers and may feel comfortable with people he sees on a regular basis. All these developmental changes may make your baby little demanding. It is very important for you as a parent to keep your calm and meet and tend to your baby’s requirements. It may get a bit daunting, and it is recommended that you may ask for help from family members and friends. 4. Your Baby’s Teething By six months of age your baby begins teething, and this can be a difficult time for your baby. Your baby’s gums may feel itchy, and he may drool all the time. Your baby will put start to put things in his mouth. It is suggested that you get good teething toys for your baby and make sure you keep them clean. Massing your baby’s gums is a good way of relieving itching. 5. Your Baby’s Communicational Skills Your baby is well aware of his surroundings by this age, though he may not talk or understand much. It is very important that you talk, sing and read to your baby. You can play games such as peek-a-boo, read a book with bigger and brighter pictures or simply sing a lullaby to your baby. Your baby is listening to you and building up his vocabulary. 6. Your Baby’s Health And Well-Being Your baby will get his third set of vaccinations by this age. Your baby may get following vaccinations by six months of age: Feature Image Source

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5 Fascinating Bedtime Stories for Babies

Do you get the feeling that your little baby is growing too fast and you want a new way to strengthen the bond that you two shares? Bedtime stories are a wonderful way to bond with your baby or toddler. Reading children a bedtime story inculcates a love of reading in them and improves their understanding of the language. When you snuggle up in bed with your toddler and read him a soothing bedtime story, it has a calming effect that lulls the baby to sleep. It is a great idea to use picture books and even books with sound effects, as babies find these books very interesting. In most cases, while the moral of the story is important, the tone and actions used help capture the baby’s attention. Once your baby grows a little old you can also tell them inspirational stories. Best Baby and Toddler Bedtime Stories Here are 5 of the best bedtime stories for babies and toddlers. These are the most popular bedtime story books that will definitely have a calming effect on your baby and soothe him to sleep. 1. Goodnight Moon This is one of the most popular short bedtime stories for toddlers with pictures. This picture book is written by Margaret Wise Brown and is about a bunny who would say goodnight to everything around him. Written as a rhyming poem, Goodnight Moon describes how the bunny says goodnight to various inanimate and living objects around him, such as a dollhouse, a red balloon, two kittens, the moon, etc. Babies love rhyming words and the calming rhythm of the story, and it swiftly lulls them to sleep. 2. The Very Hungry Caterpillar This story written by Eric Carle is one of the well-known toddler stories for bedtime. This book has colourful pictures and differently shaped pages with holes showing the caterpillar eating through various foods. On a Sunday morning, from an egg perched on the leaf, a caterpillar hatches and starts to look for food. He eats a leaf but is not satisfied. He then eats through increasing quantities of various foods for the next five days.  On Monday the caterpillar eats through 1 apple, on Tuesday 2 pears, on Wednesday 3 plums, four strawberries on Thursday, and five oranges on Friday. On Saturday, the caterpillar has an enormous feast of one piece each of chocolate cake, pickle, ice-cream cone, salami, Swiss cheese, lollipop, sausage, cherry pie, cupcake, and watermelon. After this, the caterpillar has a terrible ache in his stomach from eating too much food. He feels much better on Sunday once he returns to his regular diet of a green leaf. Later, he spins a cocoon to wrap himself and remains in it for two weeks. As the two weeks pass, the caterpillar emerges out from the cocoon transformed into a colourful, beautiful butterfly with majestic wings. This book teaches toddlers about counting, names of various foods, days of the week, and the life cycle of a butterfly. 3. Dr. Seuss’s Sleep Book You can find numerous toddler bedtime stories online, and Dr. Seuss Bedtime Stories are amongst the most popular. Dr. Seuss’s Sleep Book talks about many different creatures from various lands going through their bedtime routines before falling asleep. It starts at the County of Keck where there is a small bug named Van Vleck who yawns so wide that you can see down his neck. The yawn spreads to some birds who are building their nest to sleep for the night. The story goes on to describe even stranger creatures and the weird ways they sleep. It then talks about different things that creatures do when they sleep, such as dreaming, snoring, sleep-talking, and sleepwalking. The book then talks about various kinds of sleepers until the number of sleepers is in the billions. Finally, there is a page of sleeping creatures snuggling against each other with their eyes shut and smile on their faces. The book ends with an empty page containing just the words a good night. 4. Hush Little Baby This book is written by Sylvia Long and is a modern version of the old bedtime lullaby. The original lullaby has lyrics that promise a child various rewards such as a Mockingbird, a diamond ring, and a looking glass for being quiet and going to sleep. The one by Sylvia Long tells the story of a mother bunny that soothes her baby bunny to sleep by singing about different wonderful things in nature, such as a flying hummingbird, the evening sky, the call of crickets, a shooting star, and the harvest moon. The book ends with the mama bunny promising the baby bunny a lullaby. The book contains fascinating miniature pictures of the objects mentioned in the story. 5. The Crunching Munching Caterpillar by Sheridan Cain This book contains cheerful and bright pictures that show a caterpillar who is always hungry, but wishes that he was able to fly. The caterpillar is busy crunching and munching on leaves when various flying creatures visit him. He is visited by a bumblebee, a sparrow, and a butterfly. When he expresses his desire to fly like each of them, he is told that he is too large and bulky, has legs for walking, and lacks wings for flying. The caterpillar then wraps himself in a leaf and spins a cocoon around his body. He then naps for a long time. When he wakes, he stretches himself and discovers that he has become a beautiful butterfly with wings. Content Source Feature Image Source

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