IVF Baby

In vitro fertilisation is a process of fertilisation where an egg is combined with sperm outside the body, in vitro

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Is implantation bleeding the same when you have IVF treatment?

Among the concerns of people undergoing IVF or any other assisted fertility treatment is the question of whether the symptoms of pregnancy will be the same in the event of successful embryo transfer and implantation. In a word, yes. Although some of the stages of IVF are stimulated by the administration of medication, and in spite of the fact that the actual joining of egg and sperm takes place in the laboratory, the end result is identical. Let’s look at a brief summary of the steps that lead up to the all-important embryo implantation. The first step is ovarian stimulation which causes the ovaries to produce a number of oocytes. Next, when the oocytes have reached a suitable stage of maturity, they are extracted so that they can be mixed in the laboratory with prepared sperm. This is the point at which fertilization takes place and embryos are formed. These are observed as they develop in the laboratory and undergo any tests which are necessary. The most sound and viable embryo are then inserted into the woman’s uterus. That, in a nutshell, is the end of the process. The implantation of the embryo into the wall of the womb, once it has been placed inside the woman’s uterus, is not part of the assisted reproduction process; it is something that occurs naturally in exactly the same way as in normal sexual conception. This final stage is not guaranteed to take place as a result of IVF treatment, any more than unprotected sex at a fertile time is guaranteed to result in pregnancy. This explains how, in terms of the symptoms that you can expect, including any implantation bleeding, they are exactly the same in the case of assisted reproduction. How heavy can implantation bleed be? Can implantation bleeding have clots? Usually bleeding which occurs as a result of the implantation of an embryo is either spotting or light bleeding. It is not normally heavy and does not have clots in the way that a normal period can. If you suspect you may be pregnant and do experience heavy bleeding or clotting, then you should get medical advice as it could signal a problem or even the start of an early miscarriage. On the other hand, if you have no other reason to suspect that you’re pregnant, this type of bleeding is much more likely to be simply the start of your period. Content Source Featured Image Source

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In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) - an overview

The first step in IVF involves injecting hormones so you produce multiple eggs each month instead of only one.You will then be tested to determine whether you're ready for egg retrieval. Prior to the retrieval procedure, you will be given injections of a medication that ripens the developing eggs and starts the process of ovulation. Timing is important; the eggs must be retrieved just before they emerge from the follicles in the ovaries. If the eggs are taken out too early or too late, they won't develop normally. Your doctor may do blood tests or an ultrasound to be sure the eggs are at the right stage of development before retrieving them. The IVF facility will provide you with special instructions to follow the night before and the day of the procedure. Most women are given pain medication and the choice of being mildly sedated or going under full anesthesia. During the procedure, your doctor will locate follicles in the ovary with ultrasound and remove the eggs with a hollow needle. The procedure usually takes less than 30 minutes, but may take up to an hour. Immediately following the retrieval, your eggs will be mixed in the laboratory with your partner's sperm, which he will have donated on the same day. While you and your partner go home, the fertilized eggs are kept in the clinic under observation to ensure optimal growth. Depending on the clinic, you may even wait up to five days until the embryo reaches a more advanced blastocyst stage. Once the embryos are ready, you will return to the IVF facility so doctors can transfer one or more into your uterus. This procedure is quicker and easier than the retrieval of the egg. The doctor will insert a flexible tube called a catheter through your vagina and cervix and into your uterus, where the embryos will be deposited. To increase the chances of pregnancy, most IVF experts recommend transferring up to three embryos at a time. However, this means you could have a multiple pregnancy, which can increase the health risks for both you and the babies. Following the procedure, you would typically stay in bed for several hours and be discharged four to six hours later. Your doctor will probably perform a pregnancy test on you about two weeks after the embryo transfer. In cases where the man's sperm count is extremely low, doctors may combine IVF with a procedure called intracytoplasmic sperm injection. In this procedure, a sperm is taken from semen -- or in some cases right from the testicles -- and inserted directly into the egg. Once a viable embryo is produced, it is transferred to the uterus using the usual IVF procedure. content source

Infertility and In Vitro Fertilization

  Today, in vitro fertilization (IVF) is practically a household word. But not so long ago, it was a mysterious procedure for infertility that produced what were then known as "test-tube babies." Louise Brown, born in England in 1978, was the first such baby to be conceived outside her mother's womb. Unlike the simpler process of artificial insemination -- in which sperm is placed in the uterus and conception happens otherwise normally -- IVF involves combining eggs and sperm outside the body in a laboratory. Once an embryo or embryos form, they are then placed in the uterus. IVF is a complex and expensive procedure; only about 5% of couples with infertility seek it out. However, since its introduction in the U.S. in 1981, IVF and other similar techniques have resulted in more than 200,000 babies. What Causes of Infertility Can IVF Treat? When it comes to infertility, IVF may be an option if you or your partner have been diagnosed with:   Endometriosis Low sprem counts Problems with the uterus or fallopian tubes Problems with ovulation Antibody problems that harm sperm or eggs The inability of sperm to penetrate or survive in the cervical mucus An unexplained fertility problem IVF is never the first step in the treatment of infertility except in cases of complete  tubal blockage. Instead, it's reserved for cases in which other methods such as fertility drugs, surgery, and artificial insemination haven't worked. If you think that IVF might make sense for you, carefully assess any treatment center before undergoing the procedure. Here are some questions to ask the staff at the fertility clinic: What is your pregnancy ratio per embryo transfer? What is your pregnancy rate for couples in our age group and with our fertility problem? What is the live birth rate for all couples who undergo this procedure each year at your facility? How many of those deliveries are twins or other multiple births? How much will the procedure cost, including the cost of the hormone treatments? How much does it cost to store embryos and how long can we store them? Do you participate in an egg donation program? content source

Your age and fertility

Fertility starts to decline for women from about the age of 30, dropping down more steeply from the age of 35. As women grow older the likelihood of getting pregnant falls while the likelihood of infertility rises. Most women will be able to conceive naturally and give birth to a healthy baby if they get pregnant at 35. After 35 the proportion of women who experience infertility, miscarriage or a problem with their baby increases. By the age of 40, only two in five of those who wish to have a baby will be able to do so. The average age at which women have in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment is on the upward trend too. This reflects the increase in infertility due to age. However, the success rates of IVF treatment for women over 40 are low and have not increased much over the past decade. From a purely biological perspective, it's best to try to start a family before you're 35. Men can remain fertile for much longer than women. Even though male fertility also declines with age, it tends to happen gradually for men. While many men remain fertile into their 50s and beyond, the proportion of men with sperm disorders increases with age. The decline in male fertility is more gradual for men than women. The decline in male fertility can affect the health of the children they may go on to have. Content Source Feature Image Source

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