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5 Home Remedies for Tooth Decay

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Symptoms of Tooth Decay during pregnancy

Treatment of Tooth Decay during pregnancy

Pregnancy and Oral Health: Fact or Myth?

Many beliefs related to pregnancy and oral health have passed from generation to generation. Q1. Do women really lose a tooth with each pregnancy? • A common belief is that women lose a tooth with each pregnancy. But with good oral hygiene and professional oral health care, pregnant women’s teeth can stay healthy. Q2. Does an unborn baby really steal his or her mom’s calcium? • Another common belief is that the unborn baby takes calcium from a woman’s teeth, which causes tooth decay. This is not true. During pregnancy, women may be at greater risk for developing tooth decay because they eat more frequently to prevent nausea. Tooth decay is 100% preventable. But, if left untreated, tooth decay can cause toothaches and can lead to tooth loss. Q3. Are pregnant women really at a higher risk for gingivitis? • When women are pregnant, their bodies go through complicated changes. Many notices that their gums are sore, puffy, and prone to bleeding. These are symptoms of gingivitis, an infection of the gum tissue. Anyone can develop gingivitis. But pregnant women are at higher risk for gingivitis because of hormonal changes. If gingivitis is not treated, it may lead to a more serious gum disease that can, in turn, lead to tooth loss. Q4. How can pregnant women prevent tooth decay and gingivitis? • The best way for pregnant women to prevent tooth decay and gingivitis is to keep their teeth and gums clean. Brushing with fluoridated toothpaste twice a day, flossing once a day, and getting a professional dental cleaning is the best way to keep pregnant women’s teeth and gums healthy. Avoiding foods that are high in sugar also helps. If tooth decay is present, treatment in a dental office is the only way it can be stopped. If tooth decay and gingivitis are prevented or treated, there is no reason for pregnant women to lose teeth. Content Source Featured Image Source

How Pregnancy Affects Your Mouth?

Although many women make it nine months with no dental discomfort, pregnancy can make some conditions worse or create new ones. Regular check-ups and good dental health habits can help keep you and your baby healthy. 1. Pregnancy Gingivitis Your mouth can be affected by the hormonal changes you will experience during pregnancy. For example, some women develop a condition known as “pregnancy gingivitis,” an inflammation of the gums that can cause swelling and tenderness. Your gums also may bleed a little when you brush or floss. Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to more serious forms of gum disease. Your dentist may recommend more frequent cleanings to prevent this. 2. Increased Risk of Tooth Decay Pregnant women may be more prone to cavities for a number of reasons. If you’re eating more carbohydrates than usual, this can cause decay. Morning sickness can increase the amount of acid your mouth is exposed to, which can eat away at the outer covering of your tooth (enamel).  Brushing twice a day and flossing once can also fall by the wayside during pregnancy for many reasons, including morning sickness, a more sensitive gag reflex, tender gums, and exhaustion. It’s especially important to keep up your routine, as poor habits during pregnancy have been associated with premature delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia. 3. Pregnancy Tumors In some women, overgrowths of tissue called “pregnancy tumors” appear on the gums, most often during the second trimester. It is not cancer but rather just swelling that happens most often between teeth. They may be related to excess plaque. They bleed easily and have a red, raw-looking raspberry-like appearance. They usually disappear after your baby is born, but if you are concerned, talk to your dentist about removing them.  Medications Be sure your dentist knows what, if any, prescription medications and over-the-counter drugs you are taking. This information will help your dentist determine what type of prescription, if any, to write for you. Your dentist can consult with your physician to choose medications such as pain relievers or antibiotics, you may safely take during the pregnancy. Both your dentist and physician are concerned about you and your baby, so ask them any questions you have about medications they recommend. Content Source Featured Image Source  

Treatment of Tooth Decay During Pregnancy

You can treat pregnancy tooth decay and get relief from its pain and discomfort. Here are some techniques that help cure tooth decay effectively. 1. Brush Your Teeth Regularly: During pregnancy, brush your teeth after every meal for about five minutes. Also, floss daily. Flossing after every meal will prevent or alleviate the pain in your gums. If you often vomit, clean your teeth after vomiting to clear off extra stomach acids in your mouth 2. Be Gentle: Brush your teeth gently using a soft-bristled brush. If your gums are highly sensitive, use toothpaste available for sensitive gums. If you feel pain in gums after brushing, apply ice to minimize the pain. 3. No Sweet Foods: Sweets, cakes, candy, soft drinks, and various other sweet items contribute to tooth decay. So cut down on sweets and sour foods. Also, avoid dried fruits that stick to the gaps between your teeth. Eat fresh fruits. Make healthy choices to minimize the discomfort resulting due to tooth decay. 4. Go For Regular Dental Check-ups: Go for a dental check-up in the initial stage of your pregnancy to ensure you maintain good dental health. Also, go for dental check-ups periodically while pregnant to prevent the risk of some serious gum ailment. 5. Don’t Delay Dental Treatment Till Delivery: Tooth decay can lead to infections that may harm your unborn baby. If your dentist suggests a dental filling, go for it. Avoid putting it off till after your delivery. At the same time, do inform your dentist that you are pregnant. Content Source Featured Image Source

Causes And Symptoms of Tooth Decay During Pregnancy

Causes of Tooth Decay During Pregnancy Let’s look at why you suffer from tooth decay during pregnancy. Some of the major causes of tooth decay include: 1. Increased Acid in The Mouth: The high acid levels in your mouth break down enamel and trigger tooth decay. Your gums are more prone to inflammation and infection during pregnancy. Many pregnant women suffer from gum bleeding while brushing or flossing their teeth. 2. Dietary Changes: Pregnant women frequently crave for sour and sweet foods. Consuming sour foods and sweet drinks substantially increases your chances of contracting tooth decay. Symptoms of Tooth Decay During Pregnancy Now that you know what causes tooth decay during pregnancy let’s look at how to spot it. Many symptoms help you identify tooth decay in pregnancy. Here we list some of the main ones. 1. Pain in a tooth or toothache 2. Loose teeth 3. A lump or growth in your mouth 4. Sore and swollen gums 5. Mouth sores 6. Red-purple or red gums 7. Gums that hurt you on contact 8. Gums bleed when you brush the teeth 9. Bad breath  Content Source Featured Image Source

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Salt craving during pregnancy

Salt is the main source of dietary sodium for us.  Here is why it is important to consume salt during pregnancy: In the absence of salt, your nerves, muscles, and organs would not be able to function properly during pregnancy. In pregnancy, your body’s fluids increase in order to support your growing baby and sodium plays an important role in that. The presence of iodine in table salts is essential for the development of your baby’s brain and nervous system. Iodine deficiency during pregnancy may lead to stillbirths, abnormal brain development, miscarriage, and other medical complications. In a study, it was established that inadequate salt intake during pregnancy resulted in low birth weight infants. Inadequate salt intake during pregnancy increases the chances of foetal death.  The daily sodium intake for pregnancy should be around 3.8 grams of table salt per day; however, the upper limit may extend up to 5.8 grams.  Here are some side-effects of high sodium intake during pregnancy: Consumption of more salt in pregnancy may make you feel bloated. High salt intake may lead to water retention. More salt in your diet may cause excessive swelling of ankles, legs, feet or face. Increased amounts of salt in your diet may lead to high blood pressure or preeclampsia. Taking more amounts of salt may lead to loss of calcium (through urination) from the body. Content Source  Featured Image Source

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How to deal with hemorrhoids and varicose veins during pregnancy

Hemorrhoids and varicose veins might seem to be two different, unrelated problems, but they are actually quite similar. And, many women, especially those in the third trimester of pregnancy, have them. Both hemorrhoids and varicose veins can be defined as swollen, twisted veins. These veins can often be spotted in the legs, but they also can form in other parts of your body. When they form in the rectum, they are called hemorrhoids. What causes hemorrhoids and varicose veins in pregnancy? Normally, veins have one-way valves to help keep blood flowing toward the heart. Pressure or weakening of these valves allows blood to back up and pool in the veins. This causes them to enlarge and swell. Hemorrhoids result when rectal veins enlarge. Varicose veins occur when veins of the legs swell. Many changes in pregnancy can increase the risk of hemorrhoids and varicose veins, such as: Increased blood volume, which enlarges the veins The heavy weight of the growing baby, which presses on the large blood vessels in the pelvis, altering blood flow Hormone changes affecting blood vessels, which can slow the return of blood to the heart and cause the smaller veins in the pelvis and legs to swell Hemorrhoids can get worse with pushing or straining, especially with constipation. Being overweight and having hemorrhoids before pregnancy can also make them worse. Pushing during delivery tends to worsen hemorrhoids, too. Varicose veins tend to run in families. Sitting or standing in one position for a long time may force the veins to work harder to pump blood to the heart. This can result in swollen, varicose veins and can also worsen existing hemorrhoids. How are hemorrhoids and varicose veins in pregnancy treated? Hemorrhoids in pregnancy are a short-term problem, and they get better after your baby is born. Still, there are some things you can do to relieve the discomfort: To relieve pain, sit in a tub or take bath several times a day in plain, warm water for about 10 minutes each time. Use ice packs or cold compresses to reduce swelling. Ask your healthcare provider about creams or other medicines, such as stool softeners, that are safe to use during pregnancy. It’s important to prevent constipation by including lots of fiber and fluids in your diet. Also, try not to strain with bowel movements, and avoid sitting for a long time. Regular exercises, which involve squeezing and relaxing the muscles in your vaginal and rectal area, can help improve muscle tone. Most varicose veins that develop during pregnancy get better within the first year after birth. But for now, limit your standing or sitting for a long time without a break, and try not to cross your legs. Also try to raise your legs and feet whenever you’re sitting or lying down. Avoid tight clothing around your waist, thighs, and legs, as it can worsen varicose veins. Be sure to check with your healthcare provider if your symptoms worsen or you have excessive bleeding from hemorrhoids. And, remember that these problems are usually short-term and get better after delivery with time and treatment. Content source Featured image source

A working woman's guide to pregnancy hormonal changes

The hormonal and physiological changes that come with pregnancy are unique. Pregnant women experience sudden and dramatic increases in estrogen and progesterone. They also experience changes in the amount and function of a number of other hormones. These changes don’t just affect mood. They can also: create the “glow” of pregnancy significantly aid in the development of the fetus alter the physical impact of exercise and physical activity on the body Estrogen and progesterone changes Estrogen and progesterone are the chief pregnancy hormones. A woman will produce more estrogen during one pregnancy than throughout her entire life when not pregnant. Pregnancy hormones and exercise injuries While these hormones are absolutely critical for a successful pregnancy, they also can make exercise more difficult. Because the ligaments are looser, pregnant women may be at greater risk for sprains and strains of the ankle or knee. Weight gain, fluid retention, and physical activity Weight gain in pregnant women increases the workload on the body from any physical activity. This additional weight and gravity slow down the circulation of blood and bodily fluids, particularly in the lower limbs.  Sensory changes Pregnancy can dramatically alter how a woman experiences the world through sight, taste, and smell. Breast and cervical changes Hormonal changes, which begin in the first trimester, will lead to many physiological changes throughout the body. These changes help prepare the mother’s body for pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. Hair and nail changes Many women experience changes in hair and nail growth during pregnancy. Hormone changes can sometimes cause excessive hair shedding or hair loss. This is especially true in women with a family history of female alopecia. Stretch marks Stretch marks (striae gravidarum) are perhaps the most well-known skin change of pregnancy. They’re caused by a combination of physical stretching of the skin and the effects of hormone changes on the skin’s elasticity.  Blood pressure and exercise There are two types of circulatory changes that may have an impact on exercise during pregnancy. Pregnancy hormones can suddenly affect the tone in blood vessels. A sudden loss of tone may result in the feeling of dizziness and perhaps even a brief loss of consciousness. This is because the loss of pressure sends less blood to the brain and central nervous system. Dizziness and fainting Another form of dizziness can result from lying flat on the back. This dizziness is more common after 24 weeks. However, it can happen earlier during multi-fetal pregnancies or with conditions that increase amniotic fluid Respiratory and metabolic changes Pregnant women experience increases in the amount of oxygen they transport in their blood. This is because of increased demand for blood and the dilation of blood vessels. This growth forces increases in metabolic rates during pregnancy, requiring women to up energy intake and use caution during periods of physical exertion. Body temperature changes An increase in basal body temperature is one of the first hints of pregnancy. A slightly higher core temperature will be maintained through the duration of pregnancy. Women also have a greater need of water during pregnancy. They can be at higher risk of hyperthermia and dehydration without caution to exercise safely and remain hydrated. Dehydration Most women who exercise for 20 to 30 minutes or who exercise during hot and humid weather will sweat. In pregnant women, loss of bodily fluids from sweat can decrease the blood flow to the uterus, the muscles, and some organs. The developing fetus needs a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients carried through the blood, so injury may result from a lack of fluid.

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Pregnancy Gingvitis

7 Strategies to make labour easier

Labour is the hardest physical task that a woman experiences. Since a normal delivery takes less time to heal and doesn’t leave any visible scars on a woman’s body, most women aim to deliver vaginally. In order to do so, the mother needs to prepare her body accordingly. Although labour is a long and painful task, there are some things that you can definitely do to make it easier and smoother for you. 1. Do Squats Daily Squats is the most beneficial exercise for every woman looking forward to delivery close to their due date. Due to its role in facilitating smoother deliveries, squats are considered to be the best exercise for easy labour. The best way to do squats is using a medicine ball, keeping it between the lower back and the wall and rotating the toes and knees as wide apart as possible. It is recommended to do 15 squats daily in this position for expecting mothers to have a great delivery experience. 2. Practice Yoga After consulting your gynecologist, practice yoga during pregnancy regularly. Not only does it help to relax the body and make it flexible but also improves your breathing and prepares the body for labour. Various yoga asanas help to make the pelvic muscles more flexible to ease labour. It helps to get rid of stress and also provides relief from the aches and pains of pregnancy. Women who practice yoga during pregnancy suffer from fewer health problems. 3. Sleep Adequately and Regularly Among all the tips on how to make labour easier and faster, this is the easiest to follow and is the most effective. As discussed earlier, such a stressful and important event like labour requires calmness from the mother’s end. Only a well and adequately rested person can adapt to such a scenario seamlessly. An expecting mother should sleep at least seven hours or more every day for a faster and smoother labour experience. The sleeping experience should be enhanced with soft, skin-friendly pillows and recliner beds for the comfort of the mother and the child. 4. Massage Regular massage of the stomach along with perineal massage towards the end of the pregnancy helps to decrease discomfort and relax the muscles of the stomach and the vagina. Perineal massage helps to stretch the tissues of the vagina and this reduces the chances of vaginal tearing during birth. Massage also helps to increase the blood circulation in the perineal tissues and this in turn speeds up the process of healing after childbirth. Massaging of the thighs may also be done during labour to release tension between the contractions and to encourage the labour to progress. 5. Practice Breathing Techniques Labour is an extremely painful experience for any woman. Breathing helps the woman in labour to adapt to the pain better and also helps in relaxing her. Breathing also helps in setting rhythmic contractions and helping the woman to push better and more efficiently. Breathing also ensures that the body has enough oxygen and the mother does not pass out due to the astronomical labour pain and cramps due to her contractions. 6. Take a Childbirth Class Pregnancy is a mentally and physically taxing period for expecting parents where there is a lot of new things to be learnt and a lot of responsibilities to be understood as well as the do’s and don’ts of parenting. Hence, it is always good to be prepared for the moment of childbirth well in advance to make sure everything goes perfectly and according to plan. A childbirth class also relieves pressure that can be faced by dealing with the unknown and helps the partners be prepared for everything from the water-breaking to the cutting of the umbilical cord. A childbirth class can also be beneficial in providing easy labour tips to make the whole process simpler and faster. 7. Stay Upright during Labour Rather than lying down and trying to push, it is considered to be better to stay upright on the bed and push. This is because gravity plays to the advantage of the mother and child as the child’s head pressing against the cervix due to gravity helps it in dilating faster and more easily. A variety of positions can also be tried out, like kneeling, squatting and standing to see what gives the best results during labour. Movement of the body also helps widen the pelvis helping the baby’s head to pass through easily. Hope the above strategies help to make your labour shorter and easier!   Content Source Featured Image Source

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7 reasons why you can't get sleep at night

One of the best things you can do to manage insomnia while you’re pregnant is to have a good sleep routine. Begin by trying to go to bed at the same time every night. Start your routine with something relaxing to help you unwind.  Avoid screen time at least an hour before bed. Blue light from the TV, your mobile phone, or tablet can have an impact on your body’s circadian rhythm. Try reading a book instead. Taking a soothing bath might also make you sleepy. Just be careful that the temperature isn’t too hot — that can be dangerous for your developing baby. This is especially true during early pregnancy. Being pregnant is the best phase of your life, this is the common term everyone says, but no one tells you about the challenges. There are also a lot of sleepless nights that a woman has to face. As, the reasons can vary as per your body but the most common ones are discussed below: Frequent visit to the bathroom: Holding a life inside you is not easy. As you eat you eat for two, similarly as you drink your water intake also increases. The more you drink the more you want to pee. Your bathroom visits can make you stay up during nights. Indigestion: The hormones play a major role in here, increase in hormones can lead to indigestion. Avoid eating spicy food and opting for a healthy diet can be of help here. On the other hand, avoid eating two hours before going to bed can be of help. Baby’s movement: Baby’s like to move in the womb when mothers are lying still. Movement in the rib cage is uncomfortable for mothers and can make you stay up for all time.   Even if you are not able to sleep after adequate efforts, see your doctor and get help rightaway. Feature Image Source

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