Growth Charts

A growth chart is used by pediatricians and other health care providers to follow a child's growth over time

Ask anything about growth charts

Baby developmental milestones chart: 7 to 12 months

  Though you’ll find some specifics, like when babies sit up , “normal development” refers to these skills: Gross motor skills: using large groups of muscles, balancing, and changing position (sitting, standing, walking, etc.) Fine motor skills: using hands for smaller, more refined movements (playing, eating, etc.) Language skills: communicating via body language and understanding what others are saying Cognitive skills: more refined thinking skills, like reasoning and remembering Social skills: expressing feelings and responding to the feelings of others one in six children will have a developmental delay, but that doesn’t mean your baby will face long-term issues. Missing a few monthly milestones is not cause for panic. There are many factors that influence when infant milestones happen. In most cases, your baby just needs a little extra time. Babies born prematurely, for example, are more likely to hit each milestone counting from their due date, not their day of birth. Talk to your pediatrician if you have any concerns. 7 Month Baby Milestones In month 7, baby’s eyesight is improving, allowing for more coordination.  Transfering objects from one hand to another While your baby has explored objects by touch and mouth for months now, around month 7, baby will start transferring objects from from one hand to another, displaying spatial awareness. Improving vision Babies eye control and eye-body coordination becomes more refined. Improved depth perception allows babies to reach for toys and other objects. What’s more, babies’ color vision should be fairly strong by this age! 8 Month Baby Milestones In month 8, baby is on the move and better able to communicate with you.  Learning object permanence Their brains continue to amaze as they start to understand object permanence. This is the psychological phenomenon that helps folks understand that when something disappears from view, it doesn’t mean that it’s gone forever. (In other words, when mommy leaves the room, she will come back.) It may seem like small potatoes to grown adults, but think of the amazing intellectual leaps this takes for infants! Crawling The developmental milestone of crawling may not happen all at once or in a linear fashion—and some babies will only crawl for a short period of time. Others babies won’t crawl the way you’d expect to, crawling sideways or scooting their bottom along the floor. Crawling is very important—it not only strengthens baby’s muscles, but it also improves baby’s brain function. It’s tempting to hold baby up and try to teach them to walk—it’s such an exciting time—but a little bit of patience can really help baby. Experts saycrawling improves hand-eye coordination, plus improves comprehension, concentration, and memory.  Saying first words Your baby will be communicating now more than ever by the end of these months. She will be repeating sounds like “bababa” or, very adorably, “mamama.” (Though fair warning, mamas: Baby is likely to say Dada first.) Additionally, words start to carry meaning at this stage. You’ll find she understands simple words like, “no.” What’s more, she’ll begin to use her fingers to point, further associating movement with communication and comprehension. 9 Month Baby Milestones In month 9, baby’s brain is working hard—he/she is starting to use objects for their intended purpose.  Standing Babies should be able to stand holding on to your hands. You may even witness your baby pulling himself up. Improved dexterity Those jerky arm movements have long since disappeared. Babies are now able to wield objects more efficiently. Their improved dexterity might mean banging or shaking toys (or anything else they can get their hands on! Careful!)  This baby milestone also indicates increased cognitive function. You may notice baby beginning to use household objects for their intended purpose. For example, they may mimic drinking out of a cup (or actually do so!). This will also become apparent with pretend play, which should be just about starting. Look forward to baby pretending to talk on the phone and engaging in other imaginative play. 10 Month Baby Milestones In month 10, the fun really begins—baby understands and engages in simple games.  Cruising Baby may be walking while holding onto you or furniture. Playing interactive games By this point, babies can understand simple games (think peekaboo), find hidden objects, or take things in and out of a container. Encourage all of these behaviors! They will help develop those all important fine motor skills and every bit of playtime is also learning time. 11 Month Baby Milestones In month 11, you’ll notice baby’s flourishing personality and his/her desire to explore.  Starting to explore Baby will take all of those newfound gross motor skills like sitting, crawling, and cruising to start checking everything out. No cabinet or shelf is safe, my friends! Take steps to baby proof and make extra sure cleaning supplies, toiletries, and medicine cabinets are well off limits for baby. Better yet, work on getting any toxic junk out of your house! (See how to make natural cleaners for your home.) Developing their distinct personality Babies start to understand emotions better, reading and reacting to your emotional state. This level of communication and interaction deepens as they are able to use their bourgeoning vocabulary to state what they want and need. 12 Month Baby Milestones In month 12, baby’s brain has more than doubled in size! He/she is walking and talking.  Beginning to walk Here’s another developmental milestone you’ve been waiting for! Around 12 months, babies may begin to walk! They may still need a bit of help or support, but the pitter patter of those precious little feet are on the horizon. Improving language skills Watch out! At this stage, children should start repeating the words you say. They should already have a small vocabulary, and they will be practicing simple gestures like waving bye or shaking their head yes and no. Baby Milestones Chart Month   Milestones Month 1: Baby is getting acquainted with the outside world.     • Reacting to sights and sounds • Displaying reflexes Month 2: Baby’s development centers around his relationship with you and other caregivers.    • Paying attention to faces and recognizing people • Cooing • Smiling • Supporting their own head Month 3: Baby’s working on her coordination.    • Connecting sound, sight, and movement • Grasping objects Month 4: Baby’s cognitive, social, and motor skills start to develop at a rapid pace.     • Copying sounds, movements, and facial expressions • Rolling over • Babbling • Laughing Month 5: Baby’s becoming more expressive and preparing for crawling, pulling himself up, and walking.    • Smiling at the mirror • Expressing new emotions • Refining basic movements Month 6: Baby’s narrowing in on his communication and motor skills.    • Responding to their own name • Moving… a lot • Sitting Month 7: Baby’s eyesight is improving, allowing for more coordination.    • Transfering objects from one hand to another • Improving vision Month 8: Baby is on the move and better able to communicate with you.     • Learning object permanence • Crawling • Saying first words Month 9: Baby’s brain is working hard—he/she is starting to use objects for their intended purpose.     • Standing • Improved dexterity Month 10: The fun really begins—baby understands and engages in simple games.    • Cruising • Playing interactive games Month 11: You’ll notice baby’s flourishing personality and his/her desire to explore.     • Starting to explore • Developing their distinct personality Month 12: Baby’s brain has more than doubled in size! He/she is walking and talking.     • Beginning to walk • Improving language skills What to Do If Your Baby Isn’t Meeting Milestones All of baby’s firsts are important, but missing a few monthly milestones is usually not cause for panic. Your baby’s doctor will be watching for baby’s developmental milestones during each well child visit. If there’s any concern, the pediatrician may recommend a developmental assessment test to determine if any treatment or intervention is needed. If your doctor gives the all clear, but you still have concerns, get a second opinion. Remember: You know your child’s movements and patterns best. Even if it is just a nagging feeling, never be afraid to talk to your healthcare provider about any concerns. content source

11 Saves

This is how your baby will grow at eight months

How your baby's growing Your baby's now exploring objects by shaking them, banging them, dropping them and throwing them before falling back on the tried-and-tested method of gumming them. The idea that you do something to an object is beginning to emerge (using a comb to tidy her hair), so an activity centre with lots of things your baby can bang, poke, twist, squeeze, shake, drop and open will fascinate her. Your baby will also be fascinated with toys that have specific functions, such as phones. If she can't hold it up to her ear herself, do it for her and pretend to have a conversation. Over the next few months, she'll start to use objects for their intended purposes – brushing her hair, drinking from a cup and babbling on her play phone. Find out more fascinating facts about your eight-month-old's development How your life's changing It's completely natural for your baby to start showing signs of separation anxiety when you leave him in the care of others. In fact, it's a sign of normal, healthy development. Not that knowing this makes it any easier on you to see your baby in distress. To help the two of you weather the goodbye blues:   Say goodbye in an affectionate but matter-of-fact way. Try not to draw out farewells or let yourself get emotional in response to your baby's crying. Stay away once you say goodbye. Resist the temptation to turn back and check if he's OK. This will only make things more difficult for you both. If it will make you feel better, call when you get to where you're going. Chances are he stopped crying straight after you left and got diverted by an activity. Spend some special time together when you pick up your baby. Read the signals and trust your instincts. Does your baby react the same way when your partner does the drop-off? If not, perhaps getting him to do the dropping off is a better alternative. Does he seem unhappy when you pick him up? It's unlikely – but possible – that your baby and the babysitter or carer may just not be a good "fit".  

1 Saves

Facts About Young Children / Pinterest

1 Saves

Preschool Checklist / Pinterest

1 Saves

Baby's First Year

1 Saves

Infant Development Milestone Chart

8 Saves

Developmental milestones record for your 4 months old

Do you feel like your 4-month-old is a whole new baby at times? You’re not imagining things! The 4-month mark is a big milestone in your little one’s life, thanks to some major brain and physical development milestones. Most babies by this age will have doubled their birth weights (or more) and will be sleeping more solid and longer stretches at night. You may have a more predictable schedule for naps, bedtime, and feedings, so life might feel a little more settled. But fair warning, this month can often include the dreaded 4-month sleep regression. Don’t worry—we’re here to help. Find out what to expect from your 4-month-old. Your Growing Baby: By 4 months old, most babies have a hit a pretty significant physical milestone by doubling their birth weight. If your baby was born prematurely, for instance, they may need a little more time to double their birth weight. Developmental Milestones: Your baby will become much more active and alert and learn to interact with the world around them. Here are some of the major developmental milestones you can expect at this age. Body Rolls over from front to back Sits with the support  Bears weight when standing on a hard surface Holds a rattle or other baby toys Holds up head and chest Pushes up to elbows when laying on stomach Reaches for objects with one hand Coordinates seeing and movement—spotting something they want, then reaching for it Follows objects moving from side to side with eyes Brings hands to mouth Brain Learns cause and effect Understands object permanence Improves clarity of eyesight and enjoys looking at more patterns, shapes, and colors Smiles spontaneously, most often at people Enjoys playing and may react with negative emotion, such as crying, if playing stops Mimics facial expressions, such as smiling or frowning Babbles and may try to mimic language, like cooing Recognizes people from a distance Cries in different ways to communicate hunger, boredom, frustration, sleepiness, etc When to Be Concerned: Although every baby will develop differently, if your little one is displaying any of the following signs or symptoms, be sure to talk to your doctor about them at your baby’s 4-month well-child check-up: Crossed eyes Has gained less than 50 percent of their birth weight Is unable to hold their head up Is not able to sit up at all with support Does not seem to respond to or is uninterested in your face Soft spot that appears to be bulging Doesn’t watch items or people as they move Isn’t smiling Content source Featured image source

9 Saves

2-month-old, third week: Growth, care and more

If you feel you’re investing a lot of energy with your little one, this month may turn the tide a little bit. The early weeks of parenting can be a very one sided affair, with lots of input and not much feedback from babies to let their parents know how they’re growing. But now is the time when your baby will be more animated, smiling, beginning to coo and connect with you. Seeing your baby smile can be heart melting. Even if you’ve never had much to do with babies before, you are likely to have some idea of how to talk to your own. Just remember to establish eye contact with them, speak gently and show some animation on your face. As your baby smiles in response to you, then you, in turn will respond to them. This is known as reciprocity or the “dance” of communication which happens between a parent and their baby. Here are some crucial milestones that you may witness this month:  Feeding: Your baby may show increased signs of hunger this month and demand to be fed more often. Try to follow their lead when it comes to feeding times. If you are breastfeeding and have only been offering one breast, you may find you need to start offering both breasts at feed times in this month. Sleeping: Watch for more patterns of sleep developing this month, with your baby sleeping anywhere from 1-3 hours between most of their day sleeps. They are likely to be showing tired signs after the end of their feed session and this is often the best time to place them into their cots for a sleep. Total sleep over 24 hours varies considerably and any amount between 9-18 hours is considered normal at this age. Behaviour: Many babies peak in their crying episodes at 2 months, causing their parents to become almost as distressed. There are many reasons for baby’s cry even when it seems that all of their needs have been met. Maturation of the nervous system, being overwhelmed by stimulus, becoming overtired or just wanting reassurance are some of the most common reasons. Developmental milestones: Your baby’s involuntary grasp reflex will disappear around now, only to be replaced by a deliberate grip. Make sure you have some rattles and small but safe toys which they can entertain themselves with. This is also the time when your baby will discover their hands and feet and will keep themselves amused for stretches of time. As yet, your baby is still too young to know that those interesting appendages belong to them which mean they’ll be just as fascinated each time their hands and feet happen to cross their field of vision. Baby’s brain is hard at work learning to distinguish colors. As a result, baby will probably begin to show a preference for bright primary colors and more detailed and complicated designs. Encourage this development by showing baby pictures, photos, books, and toys. Growth: Your baby is likely to have a lot of growth and weight gain in the 2nd month, with an average of 150-200 grams per week. Don’t worry if they gain a lot of weight one week and not so much the next. Weight gain is only one indicator of growth. Head circumference and length, contentedness and general behaviour are equally as important as what the numbers and percentiles on the scales demonstrate.     Content source Featured image source  

13 Saves

Your 2 months old baby growth and development

All your efforts and hard work as a doting parent will begin to show during your baby’s second month. Your baby isn’t quite capable of providing you with feedback about how they are currently doing but this month can be a bit more rewarding. Expect more smiles and a lot of cooing as your baby becomes animated. You are sure to get a strong emotional connection than earlier as you revel in the joys of motherhood. Second Month Baby Milestones: Motor Skills Two-month-old babies are gaining more control over their bodies. That means they can hold their head a little steadier while lying on their tummies or being supported upright. In the second month of life, babies continue to have a strong sucking reflex. You may notice your baby likes to suck on a fist or a few fingers. This is one of the best ways babies have of comforting themselves. At 2 months, your baby doesn’t yet have the coordination to play with toys. But she may bat at a colorful object hanging in front of her. Your baby may even briefly hold a toy that you place in one of her hands. Second Month Baby Milestones: Sleep Your baby’s sleep patterns are evolving, but at two months, they still aren’t fully established. At this age, babies sleep 15 to 16 hours a day. But those hours are sporadic, and they usually aren’t ready to sleep through the night. This is especially true for breastfed babies, who generally wake up to eat every three hours or so. Hang in there for just a few more weeks and you’ll be able to get some much-needed rest. You may even be able to get to a full night’s sleep earlier by helping your baby learn how to fall asleep on her own. All babies need to be put to sleep on their backs to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). You can provide plenty of tummy time when your baby is awake and supervised. Also, remove all soft objects from baby’s crib, including pillows, blankets, stuffed animals, and soft bumpers. Second Month Baby Milestones: The Senses At two months, babies can see objects -- and people -- from up to 18 inches away. That means you still need to get pretty close, but your baby will be able to see your face pretty well while feeding. She should also be able to follow movements when you walk close by. Baby’s hearing is improving, too. Your 2-month-old will especially enjoy listening to the sound of your voice. Second Month Baby Milestones: Communication For a 2-month-old, most communication consists of crying. But you may hear a few gurgles, grunts, and even some sweet coos. Your baby should recognize your face and voice, and respond to them. You might even see the first adorable hint of a smile. One of the most important things you can do at this age is talk to your baby. Even though 2-month-old babies can’t talk back, they will respond to the sound of your voice, and it will encourage them to start forming their own first words in the coming months.     Content source Featured image source

18 Saves

Four-weeks old baby: Health, growth, care and more

At 4 weeks, your baby is almost a month old and you've both gone through an enormous amount of change in a very short period of time. Before you do anything else, give yourself a pat on the back for making it this far and recognise all that you have accomplished since you met your little one. You’ve made it through sleepless nights, struggled through feedings, and learnt to do pretty much any task one-handed. But just like every new week so far, there’s plenty more in store for both of you! Here’s what you need to know about your 4-week-old baby. Developmental Milestones: Some babies will develop a little faster than others and some babies may need time to “catch up.” At 4 weeks old, your baby might be able to: Body Hold their head up for a few minutes Lift hands toward the face or mouth, but it won’t be long before they reach their mouth! Control more head movement, like turning the neck from side to side Make jerky, quivering arm thrusts Keep hands in tight fists Continue strong reflex movements Brain Recognize you, your partner, or family members with widened eyes  See more clearly, up to about 18 inches in front of them Listen intently when you speak or sing Start to coo May turn toward familiar sounds, including your voice. Hearing is fully developed at this stage. Study human faces Baby Care Basics: By four weeks, chances are you’ve become a diaper-changing pro! Whether you are using cloth diapers or disposable diapers, your little one may start experiencing a diaper rash from time to time, especially during the summer months. To help prevent and treat diaper rash: Change your baby’s diaper more frequently: As soon as you notice the diaper is wet or soiled during the day, change it.  Use a diaper rash cream: You can apply a diaper rash cream as a preventive measure, especially if your baby is prone to getting rashes.  Air it out: The best way to prevent and treat diaper rash is to let your baby go all-natural.    If your baby seems excessively uncomfortable, especially after a feeding, they may be experiencing gas. Try these helpful tips: Burp after feedings: Be sure to burp your baby from the bottom upward to facilitate the air movement. Switching formulas: Your infant may need to change formulas several times before finding one that works best for their digestive system. Change bottles: Bottles and nipples are all made differently, so it might be helpful to try several types of bottles and nipples that have different kinds of airflow to experiment with what reduces gas in your little one. Health & Safety At 4 weeks old, your baby will have another well-child check-up. At this visit, the pediatrician will evaluate your baby’s growth and development and go over important safety guidelines with you. You can expect to be asked about: Your home environment: If you smoke, you should quit to reduce the risk of SIDS and increase your baby’s health. No smoke or secondhand smoke should be around the baby. Car seat safety: At 4 weeks old, your infant should be in a rear-facing infant seat. Vaccines: The second dose of the Hepatitis B vaccine may also be administered at this visit. Content source Featured image source

6 Saves

When do babies roll over? Tips to get rolling!

After your baby develops the strength to hold his head up, he'll learn to roll over. This means your baby can flip from lying on his back to being on his tummy and vice versa. Rolling over is one of your baby's first steps towards becoming mobile. When will my baby be able to roll over? Your baby will probably be able to roll over when he's about six months or seven months, when his neck and arm muscles are strong enough. Some babies manage to roll over as early as three months, but other babies take longer than seven months. Your baby may take you by surprise by suddenly getting the hang of rolling over. This is why it is so important never to leave your baby unattended when changing his nappy on a raised surface. Just in case, it may be a good idea to get into the habit of changing his nappy while he is lying on the floor. How will my baby learn to roll over? Newborn to two months: Giving your baby tummy time from day one will start helping your baby to develop the muscles he needs to learn to roll over. Tummy time encourages your baby to move his arms and legs, and it will also boost his neck strength. You may find your baby does not like being on his tummy at first. Being in this new position can be a strange experience for him. If this is the case, you could try laying him in this position for just a minute or so at a time. If your baby really doesn't like being on his tummy, just try it again another time. Three months to four months: When you put your baby on his tummy at three months, he may be able to lift his head and shoulders off the floor using his arms. This mini push-up helps him strengthen the muscles he'll use to roll over. At this point he may amaze you, and himself, by flipping from his back to his front, or vice versa. Five months to seven months: Your baby may be able to lift his head, push up on his arms, and arch his back to lift his chest off the ground. He may also rock on his stomach, kick his legs, and swim with his arms. All of this exercise strengthens his muscles. By the time your baby is about six months or seven months old, he's likely to have learned to roll over in both directions. Once my baby can roll over, what will he do next? The muscles your baby uses to roll over are mostly the same as the ones he uses to crawl and sit unsupported. When your baby has perfected the roll, his neck, back, legs, and arms will get stronger. By about eight months, he'll be able to sit up without any support. Around the same time, or a little later, your baby may then start to bottom shuffle or crawl around the house. Content source Featured image source

2 Saves

4-Month-old daily routine that will work for you

Getting into a routine with your baby is an important thing. You will gradually learn to read your baby's cues to develop a pattern of eating, sleeping, and playing that meets your little one's requirements and works for your family. It can be a big assistance to notice what other moms and dads are doing. As you're creating a schedule for your baby, you must remember that most of the 3 and 4 months old babies require the following things: Wake and milk feed at 6 AM: Depending on the last time your little one was fed, this first feed of the day might be a big one. Make sure to take note if your baby is not super hungry —this might be a sign that you need to cut back on feeding in the middle of the night. For those breastfeeding, you'll probably be very full in the morning, particularly after a long stretch of rest and not feeding. Naptime at 8:15 AM - 9:15 AM: Don't be surprised if your baby needs a nap before this time, two hours awake is just enough time to tire the little one out at this time in the morning. Just keep an eye on how long they sleep. Too long might mean that they don't get enough to eat during the day, making them hungrier at night. Bathing and Milk feeding at 9:15 AM: It's up to you to decide if a bath feels right at this time of day. After bathing, it is time to feed your baby.   Naptime at 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM: Let your little one recharge for another 30 minutes if they don't wake up on their own. Milk Feed at 12:15 PM: Feeding time has come (again) and this may not happen for another half an hour, when baby awakes. Naptime at 2:15 PM - 3:15 PM: Babies are like cats with their naps, sometimes only needing 15-40 minutes at this time (or a little longer if they want). Let the little one sleep for another 30 minutes if they don't wake up on their own at this time. Milk feed at 3:15 PM: Time wake up the baby and feed. Last milk feed at 6:00 PM: Your little one is at the age where you can start thinking about trying to keep them from falling asleep at the bottle or breast. Maybe break up the feed and bedtime with a song or story to create some positive sleep associations. Sleep time at 7 pm: Time for bed. Sweet Dreams! Content source Featured image source    

26 Saves

Babycare tips for 6 month old baby

1. Your Baby’s Nutritional Needs One of the most important tips to take care of a six-month-old baby is your baby’s diet and nutrition. By six months your baby is all set for solid foods because by this age not only his body’s nutritional demands have increased, but his developing digestive system is ready for solid foods too. Also, breast milk lacks iron, and it is very important for your baby’s growth and thus giving fortified cereals to your baby will be a good idea. You can give pureed fruits to your baby too. However, milk will still be the main source of nutrition to your baby, and your baby may still be on the breast or formula milk till he turns one. But it will be a good idea to start giving sipper cup to your baby once in a while. 2. Your Baby’s Sleep Sleep is very important for healthy growth of your baby. Make sure your baby takes two to three naps in a day and sleeps for almost 10 hours at night. It is recommended that you follow a sleep-schedule for your baby and try to put your baby to sleep almost at the same time every day. Ensure there are no distractions in the room and you create a calm and peaceful environment for your baby. Babies at this age become quite aware of their surroundings and may get easily distracted. 3. Your Baby’s Developmental Milestones Your little one is very active by the time he turns six months. He is able to roll, sit with support, babble a few words and does various other things. Your baby may feel wary of strangers and may feel comfortable with people he sees on a regular basis. All these developmental changes may make your baby little demanding. It is very important for you as a parent to keep your calm and meet and tend to your baby’s requirements. It may get a bit daunting, and it is recommended that you may ask for help from family members and friends. 4. Your Baby’s Teething By six months of age your baby begins teething, and this can be a difficult time for your baby. Your baby’s gums may feel itchy, and he may drool all the time. Your baby will put start to put things in his mouth. It is suggested that you get good teething toys for your baby and make sure you keep them clean. Massing your baby’s gums is a good way of relieving itching. 5. Your Baby’s Communicational Skills Your baby is well aware of his surroundings by this age, though he may not talk or understand much. It is very important that you talk, sing and read to your baby. You can play games such as peek-a-boo, read a book with bigger and brighter pictures or simply sing a lullaby to your baby. Your baby is listening to you and building up his vocabulary. 6. Your Baby’s Health And Well-Being Your baby will get his third set of vaccinations by this age. Your baby may get following vaccinations by six months of age: Feature Image Source

6 Saves

Baby developmental milestones: 3 months

All babies have their own timetables. Little boys and girls simply grow and develop at their own rates, and on their own unique schedules. However, there are several common markers you can watch for. Celebrate with your baby as he reaches or nears the following key developmental milestones. May raise head and chest while on tummy: For your baby, holding up his head and chest while leaning on his elbows will be a major triumph. Hold a toy in front of your baby to encourage him to lift his head and look forward. This strengthens his neck muscles. Opens and shuts hands: Is your baby staring at her hands a lot these days? She's just discovered that she can open and shut them. Press a lightweight toy or rattle in her hand and she'll grip it, explore or shake it, and drop it when she loses interest. Pushes down on legs when feet are on a firm surface: Let your baby stand for a few seconds with some help from you. Hold him in a standing position with his feet on the floor and he'll push down and straighten his legs. Let him bounce a couple of times if he tries. May swipe at dangling objects and may grasp and shake hand toys: Your baby is learning hand-eye coordination. Lay her under an infant gym and she'll throw her whole body into batting and grabbing for the dangling toys. Hold a toy in front of her while she's sitting on your lap and let her try to reach for it. Can start to follow moving objects with eyes: Your baby's eyes can move and focus at the same time now. He may follow an object moving all the way around in a half-circle. He loves watching things move! Jiggle a mobile above his crib. Watching it will be a favourite activity. Recognises familiar objects and people at a distance: At birth, your baby could only see fuzzy shapes. Now she can recognize the outline of a face when someone enters the room. She even may smile at you from across the room! Take her out often in her stroller or baby carrier and let her discover all there is to see. May make cooing sounds and turns head towards some sounds: Is your baby cooing, aahing, and oohing? He's starting to imitate sounds, the first step to speech. Coo back to him and he'll begin to understand how two people talk. Sprinkle real words into talks with baby, too. He'll understand words long before he can say them. Content source Featured image source

6 Saves

Tips and tricks- Increasing neck strength and head control

When you hold a newborn, many worries go through your mind about her head which bobbles so unsteadily on her neck that you may get afraid she will hurt herself. While your newborn may not require head support, she will develop good head control very quickly if you give her the opportunity to strengthen her neck muscles. All you have to do is just follow some simple techniques which can help your baby develop the ability to control her head. It is an essential developmental step required for later physical development. Given below are some of the essential steps which will help your baby control her head:   Practice Tummy Time: Lying her on her stomach, either on the floor or on your lap is one way to help your baby develop her neck muscles. The activity is also known as “tummy time”. You need to make her practice tummy time only when she is awake. If you make her practice it during her sleep time, it may increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Start with two to three minutes per day with your newborn and work up to 20 to 30 minutes per day. Around 75 percent of infants around the world spend less than 20 minutes per day in the prone position, according to a study reported in the July 2012. Spending just six additional minutes per day helped infants develop head control more quickly, the study found. Holding Upright: Holding your baby upright encourages her to hold her head up and look around, which strengthens her neck muscles. While at first your baby may just nestle into your shoulder, sooner than you might think she will try to raise her head up to look around and see other people and objects. Support her back with your hand, so she doesn't fall backwards. According to a study, spending 12 minutes per day in an upright position also helps facilitate head control development. Pull to Sit: Once your baby reaches the age of 3 to 4 months, gently encouraging her into a sitting position by pulling on her hands can help her strengthen neck and back muscles. Assess your baby's ability to handle this. If her head doesn't come off the floor when you pull on her arms or if her head wobbles excessively, she might not be ready to be pulled into a sitting position. Pull just until her shoulders come off the ground, increasing the pull gradually as she develops better muscle control. Exercise Balls: If you have room for an exercise ball, a large or soft ball often used in therapy programs, it can help you develop your baby's neck and back muscles. When you move the ball forward, your baby must work against gravity to keep her head upright, which helps develop strong neck muscles. You can also put your baby in a sitting position and gently roll her backwards so that she must work to hold her head up. Content source Featured image source

9 Saves

The average weight and length of 6-month-olds

Average Weight and Length of 6-month-olds How a baby grows and develops depends on a lot of factors. From genetics, medical care, overall health to what they eat and drink, everything affects the rate at which they grow. However, one must remember that each and every baby grows at their own pace and while the six-month baby next door might look a little taller and heavier, it is perfectly healthy and normal for your baby to look petite and a tad bit lighter. At six months, the average weight and length of a baby should be as follows: Baby boy Baby girl Weight – 6.5 to 9.5 kg Weight – 6 to 8.5kg Length – 24.8 to 28.25 inches Length – 24 to 27.25 inches   Understanding weight To measure the weight of your baby, the nurse might weigh the baby with no or minimum clothes on. At six months, your baby should be eating around 4 to 5 meals of approximately 250 grams each. This is just an approximation and should be used as a guide. Unless your pediatrician advises you to, do not overfeed, were underfed or force-feed your baby. If your baby is on the chubby side and their health is an increasing cause of concern, then you might need to relook into the kind of food you are giving them. Do not start limiting their food thinking that less food would keep their weight in check. Instead ensure that you give them nutritious food that is not high on empty calories. For example, if you are giving them juice, then do not give more than 120 ml of unsweetened juice. If your child has started semi/solid food, then you can steam fruits and vegetables for them instead of giving them juices. Alternatively, you are child is still on liquids, then you can puree fruits and vegetables for them. If your baby’s weight does not fall in this range, then you need to speak with your doctor. It is possible that they are allergic to something that they are eating and are therefore unable to pick up the expected weight. Understanding length Length measurement would be computed from the top of the baby’s head to their heels. On an average, babies grow from half an inch to an inch each month from their birth to six months. And from six months to a year, they grow a centimeter every month. All infants go through growth spurts, a time when they grow more. These spurt periods, lasting a week, can be seen when the babies reach the following benchmarks: 10 to 14 days 5 to 6 weeks or 1 and a half month 12 weeks or three months 16 weeks or four months Height and weight are important indicators of your child’s growth. Reaching the expected weight and length is not important, what is important is the growth curve. If your doctor notices that your baby’s growth curve is going in the negative or has slowed in the first year and they fail to meet certain development milestones, they might want to refer you to a specialist, who would want to conduct some tests. Featured image source

2 Saves

Physical Development In Early Childhood

Children grow at a rapid pace between birth and two years of age. But once they hit the age of two, toddlers tend to have a much slower growth rate when compared to their younger self. This is when the parents are concerned about the changing eating habits of their child and wonder whether the kid is growing normally. The physical development in infancy happens in a series of growth spurts. It is important to keep in mind that after the growth spurts, they grow at a standard and steady rate until adolescence. The best way to determine if they are growing properly is to closely monitor and track their growth. What Is Physical Development? As your little one grows, so does his body. Slowly but steadily, your child is preparing to take on the structural build which is almost similar to that of an adult. Signs of a Child’s Physical Development Here are some of the pronounced signs of a child’s physical development: 1. Limbs The arms and legs of the child grow longer and will be proportionate to the torso as well as the head. It can also be noticed that your child will appear much slimmer and distinctively thinner than he was as an infant. 2. Muscle Growth Muscle growth tends to be faster in order to aid movement in the child. The muscles of the arms and the legs that are larger are known to grow faster than the muscles in the toes or the fingers, which are smaller. At this stage, it is important to provide proper nutrients to your child to aid the growth process. 3. Brain Development Brain development will help your child perform complex mental and physical tasks. During early childhood, there is significant growth in the neural fibers in the brain, specifically in the frontal lobes. It is also noted that around 2 years the human brain is already 70% of its adult size. By the age of six or seven, the size of the brain is almost 90% of its adult size. The increase in motor skills can be contributed to this growth. It is also a common practice to measure the circumference of the head in order to figure out the growth rate of the brain. 4. Motor Skills Motor skills are associated with the child’s ability to perform tasks on an everyday basis. It can be anything from running to building blocks. Motor skills can be categorized as: a. Gross Motor Skills Also called for large motor skills, these are the skills that are required to perform general tasks like running, walking, jumping or even balancing their bodies as they engage in these activities. With your gross motor skills, your child should be able to perform some of the below activities, •    Walk with a steady balance •    Run comfortably in a single direction or around obstacles •    Throw a ball or catch one •    Hop on each foot several times •    Jump over objects or low-lying hurdles •    Kick a ball that is stationary •    Pedal a tricycle b. Fine Motor Skills Also called small motor skills, these involve finer movements and holds necessary to perform tasks that may be slightly complicated. These are also associated with the brain development of the child. Fine motor skills allow the child to: •    Use cutlery •    Brush teeth or comb hair •    Pick up small items likes coins •    Work on simple puzzles •    Draw simple shapes like circles or squares •    Stack up blocks 5. Height By 12 months, the length of an infant is known to increase by about 50% the birth length. When children reach the age of five, they can be double their birth length. Also, boys reach half of their adult height around two years and girls are half their adult height when they are about nineteen months old. 6. Weight At one year, the weight of the infants is three times that of the birth weight. The growth rate tends to slow down after the first year and between one to six years, he will be gaining around 2kg per year. 7. Teeth Typically, around five to nine months of age, your baby will have lower front teeth. The teeth on the upper front appear around eight to twelve months of age. Children tend to get all 20 of their baby teeth or deciduous teeth by the age of 2 and a half years. Permanent teeth replace the baby teeth anywhere between the ages of 5 to 13. Ways to Boost Physical Development in Toddlers and Pre-schoolers You can work out in some physical development activities for pre-schoolers to help improve their dexterity and development: • Walk with the kids and provide them with the opportunity to run and jump and use their large muscles. • Prepare a simple obstacle course for your child to jump over and run around in your backyard or in the house. • Play catch with balls. You can also play games that will help the child learn to kick and throw the ball. • Have a mini dance party at home. Put on some music and dance with your child, especially to nursery songs that stimulate fine motor skills. • Play pretend games like laying a tightrope on the ground and trying to balance on it. • Get creative with art. Provide your child with ample opportunities to draw in and around the house. Content Source

1 Saves