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6 home remedies of gas relief for babies

  Gas in the stomach can be the air swallowed through the mouth, or it can be the gas naturally produced by bacteria within the gastrointestinal tract. A baby can develop a gassy tummy due to any of the following reasons : Drinking formula too fast: Babies who breastfeed feed at a controlled pace, but formula-fed infants tend to gulp down a lot more when the bottle is held vertically into the mouth. This leads to ingestion of surplus air that gets trapped within the stomach and causes bloating. Poor latch to the nipple: Babies who do not latch properly to the breast or bottle nipple tend to leave a considerable gap between their mouth and the nipple. This gap can permeate the surrounding air, which the baby swallows along with the milk. Formula mixing and type: Some babies may develop gas after consuming a particular kind of formula. If you mix formula by shaking it in a bottle, then it can infuse a lot of gas in the liquid, that eventually ends up in the baby’s stomach. Not burping the baby between feeds: You should burp your baby between feeds since they cannot do it themselves. Leaving the baby without burping leads to accumulation of gas inside the belly. Too much crying: If the baby had been crying a lot, then they could inhale a lot of air that accumulates within the stomach and causes gassiness. Mother’s diet: What you eat is what you pass to your baby through breast milk. Certain food items may contain compounds that can get into breast milk and cause gas in babies. Eating various solid foods: Older infants and toddlers eat a wide variety of food. Bacteria within the gut can produce excess gas when digesting specific food items. What Are The Symptoms Of A Gassy Baby?   A baby with gas in the tummy displays the following symptoms : Fussiness and irritability: It is probably the first sign you notice, especially after feeding the baby. Your baby will inexplicably become fussy and irritable while otherwise being alright. Bloating: A baby’s bloated belly may indicate trapped gas. The belly will also be firm to touch. Pulling legs towards tummy: The baby will try to relieve any discomfort caused by bloating by pulling the legs upwards. Rubbing belly: Infants may also rub their belly while older infants and toddlers may hold or point towards the tummy to express discomfort. Gurgling noises from the stomach: If the surroundings are quiet, then you may even hear gurgling sounds from the baby’s belly. It could be a result of gas moving inside the gastrointestinal tract. It is most likely to occur sometime after a feed. Crying while squirming: If the gas causes severe bloating, then a baby may cry and squirm due to the discomfort. Sometimes, gassiness and bloating can cause extreme discomfort, warranting medical attention. Home Remedies For Gas In Babies A few natural remedies can work effectively as preventive measures for gas among infants. Parents must try the following steps at home when the baby displays symptoms of gas: Burp: Timely burping after a feed prevents accumulation of gas in the baby’s gastrointestinal tract. After every feed, hold the baby in your arms such that their head rests on your shoulder. Gently tap and rub the baby’s back between the shoulders till you hear a burp. Make sure to place a cloth on your shoulder since babies normally tend to regurgitate small amounts of liquid from their stomach. Basic baby exercises: One of the best exercises for gas in babies is bicycle kicks. Lay your baby on the back on a soft surface. Move their legs up and down on a regular basis. The exercise will help your baby relieve the gas and feel better.   Give tummy time: Experts suggest that regular tummy time improves upper body strength among infants. Adequate abdominal muscle strength allows the gut to relieve itself from gas. The pressure on the belly during tummy time also helps in the removal of gas. Tummy massage: Gentle clockwise massage around the navel stimulates the movement of food and gas through the gastrointestinal tract. You can consult a paediatrician or a certified paediatric massage therapist to learn specific massage techniques to relieve gas in babies. Firm nipple latch is important: Check if your baby is latching right to prevent them from gulping air while they feed. The baby is holding on right when their mouth covers the entire nipple.  A good latch also causes suckling sounds, which let you know that the baby is feeding properly. Babies with some orthodontic problems tend to have a tough time with nipple latching. Get your baby checked by the doctor if you feel they could have a problem. You can also try different bottle nipples. A small or big bottle nipple could cause a baby to suction air. Do not let the baby lie down with a bottle placed vertically in their mouth. Instead, control the flow of the milk by using techniques like paced bottle feeding. Switch formulas: If you suspect the current formula is causing gas, then try another. Sometimes the baby may have gas if they have lactose intolerance. If the symptoms of gas persist for long, you should consult a doctor. Can Solid Food Cause Gas In Babies? Yes. Some foods can make the gastrointestinal tract of a baby more susceptible to the production of gas: VEGETABLES FRUITS CEREAL AND GRAINS MILK PRODUCTS Cabbage Pears Cereal Cheese Cauliflower Apples Whole wheat Yogurt Broccoli Peaches Bran   Onions       Beans – nearly all types       The baby can eat most of the above foods, except milk products, on attaining the age of six months . Do keep in mind that solids are essential for the baby to meet their recommended dietary allowance (RDA). So instead of avoiding them totally, decrease the portion size and serve them during multiple feeds in a day. In case of foods such as wheat, you can consult a doctor if there is too much gas since it could be an indicator of allergy. While food eaten by the baby is a plausible cause for gas, what the mother eats may also lead to gassiness in breastfed infants.   Can The Mother’s Diet Cause Gas In ABreastfeeding Baby? Yes. Usually, gassy vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and beans can affect the baby. Some babies may develop gas when the mother eats spicy foods. The effect of the foods eaten may vary from mother to mother, so watch out for what you eat and how it affects your baby to determine the ideal diet when you breastfeed. Pediatric experts state that unless your baby develops gassiness within six hours of you eating a specific food, there is no need to stop eating it (11). Remember, some gas in babies is normal. You pass the nutrients you get through fruit and vegetables to your baby. Therefore, avoid eating a food item if your baby has too much trouble, but pause consumption albeit temporarily. Content source  Featured image source

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Advantages and Disadvantages of Bottle Feeding/Formula Feeding

Mothers have to make so many decisions on how to raise their children and what can give them the best start in life. Perhaps the first choice you need to make is whether to bottle feed or breastfeed your new-born.   While most pediatricians will agree when it comes to baby feeding that “breast is best”, there are of course times when it's just not practical, or possible, to breastfeed. In such cases, the option of bottle feeding can come as a blessed substitute for mothers.   If you're considering bottle feeding, this information may help you have a better picture of the benefits and the downsides, so that you can make a more well-rounded decision.   Advantages of Bottle Feeding & Formula Feeding Here are some of the advantages and benefits of bottle feeding and formula feeding: • When feeding your baby with formula feed, you can measure exactly how much food your little one is getting per feeding. This is useful in understanding how much food is necessary for your baby to feel full. • Bottle feeding helps parents share the work of feeding. Babies who are breastfed usually need to eat every two or three hours. When it comes to bottle feeding, since the bottle does the work, mum doesn't have to be the one on call at all times. Bottle feeding allows anyone in the family to help out when it comes to feeding little Junior. • Mums who choose to bottle feed their babies don't have to worry about altering their diet to meet the needs of their baby. Caffeine, alcohol, and calorie intake are more flexible. Nursing mums are advised to take in about 500 calories per day, which can make weight loss difficult. • Formula-fed babies will generally eat less often than breastfed babies because baby formulas take longer to digest than mother's milk.   Disadvantages of Bottle Feeding & Formula Feeding Here are some of the disadvantages you may experience if you decide to feed your child with a bottle and formula feed: • Certain studies suggest that mums who breastfeed are less likely to develop breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and osteoporosis later in life.   • Some research has seen mothers who bottle feed are more likely to experience postpartum depression. Though the exact cause of this is up to considerable debate, studies do suggest that mothers who breastfeed are less prone to experience postpartum depression than mothers who don’t.   • Studies have suggested that women who breastfeed are less likely to develop Type 2 Diabetes later in life.    • Breast milk contains more nutrients than formula and helps promote brain growth and development. Breast milk also helps improve your baby's immunity. • Breast milk is easier on the digestive system of a new-born than formula is. • Nursing provides comfort to your little one and can help calm him when he is upset, sick, or dehydrated. Nursing also strengthens the bond between mother and child. • Bottle feeding is less convenient during midnight feeding sessions as it requires your full attention to get up and prepare the bottle. • Formula food can be an expense. • Breast milk contains infection-fighting antibodies that formula food can't duplicate.   If you choose to breastfeed your baby, try to continue until about 12 months. If you wean your baby before 12 months, avoid giving them cow's milk feedings, but instead iron-fortified infant formula to replace the iron intake from breast milk. In most cases, the most ideal nutrition for your little one is breast milk, as it provides the ideal nutrition that is necessary for your baby's development, especially during the first six months.   However, should you decide that bottle feeding works out better for you, then go for it guilt-free! There are advantages and benefits to bottle feeding. Remember, when it comes to how you feed your baby, nobody knows your little one better than you.   Whether you opt for the bottle or breast, the choice is entirely your own. Content Source Featured Image Source

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Avoiding Breastfeeding Problems / Peachymama

7 Common Bottle Feeding Problems

There are various reasons for a baby to refuse bottle feeding; the good news is that most of these reasons are behavioral in nature and can be addressed, sometimes, by simply observing the baby for vital clues. Given below are some common problems associated with bottle feeding and their solutions. 1. Misinterpreting Hunger The most common and the most easily correctable problem related to bottle feeding is the misinterpretation of hunger by new moms. Babies tend to suck on their thumbs and other objects for various reasons other than being hungry. A baby may suck on things out of anxiety, boredom or simply being tired; many mothers misinterpret this reflex of hunger. Attempting to feed the baby based on this behaviour can result in the baby refusing to feed simply because it is not hungry. What to Do If the baby is refusing to feed, do not force it, accept that you may have misinterpreted and wait till the baby gives more clear clues of being hungry. 2. Misinterpreting/Miscalculating Feeding Amount The second most common and easily correctable problem with regards to bottle feeding is miscalculating the amount of milk or baby formula a baby really needs. Sometimes parents make calculations based on expert opinion or simply guesstimate their baby’s daily requirement of milk or formula. And sometimes professionals make the mistake of not properly calculating requirements based on changing requirements as the baby is growing. Whatever the case may be, if a baby has had enough and is not hungry, it will refuse to feed. What to Do Commonly estimated feeding suggestions are only approximate figures and can vary from baby to baby. Some babies feed more than others and some less. As noted above, wait till the baby gives more clear clues of being hungry. 3. Distracted Baby Humans are naturally curious beings; this curiosity is apparent as early as four months from being born. Once a baby is four months or older, his curiosity makes him take more interest in everything around him. Other children playing, pets acting up, and even music and television can distract a baby and make it lose focus on feeding. What to Do If you feel your baby is distracted, turn of all sound sources such as television, music, etc., better still is to find a quiet room without people, children or pets. 4. Tired Baby A baby may refuse to bottle feed simply because it is tired. A baby that has not slept enough will tire quickly; while it is true that a hungry baby may sleep less, it is equally true for a baby deprived of sleep to avoid feeding. It will throw up a fuss, cry or fall asleep while feeding. What to Do Seek expert opinion on sleeping and feeding schedules, or create a balanced schedule to avoid overlapping sleeping time with feeding time. Also, ensure that your baby is getting enough sleep and try to feed the baby before it gets tired. 5. Individual Feeding Pattern Like all mammals, humans tend to display individual personality types, behavioral patterns, and feeding habits from very early in their lives. Some babies like to consume large amounts of food at one go; others like to feed a little at a time but more often during the day. If your baby is frequently refusing to bottle feed, then it is prudent to consider that you may not have fully understood his/her individual feeding pattern. Constantly feeding a baby can put added stress on the mother. Ideally, a baby’s individual pattern should be respected, but if needed, an attempt can be made to gently and gradually encourage a change. What to Do A baby should be encouraged to feed much of what food it needs in about forty minutes, but given individual patterns, this should not be forced. Stop if the baby does not wish to continue. Another approach to a frequent feeding pattern is to try and create longer intervals between feeds. Encourage play or take the baby for an outing, or let it nap to gradually increase the time intervals between feeds. 6. Bottle Feeding Aversion Some babies may develop an allergy to milk protein or may develop intolerance to milk or formula. There are many factors that may induce feeding aversions, such as certain physical or oral problems and reflux. Fortunately, most feeding aversions are a result of behavioral issues than actual physical problems or medical conditions. What to Do A feeding aversion can be a very complicated problem with no easy or straightforward solutions. If all else fails, then the only solution is to consult experts to try and identify the root cause of this aversion. 7. Night Feeding New-born babies need to be fed frequently and even at night. Avoid feeding a baby, that has reached six months, at night. If night feeding continues beyond six months it could result in a formula fed baby refusing bottle. This is no cause for alarm; it may simply be that the baby relies on feeding to fall asleep. Night time feeding will not harm the baby, but given that a baby needs only a certain amount of food every twenty-four hours, she may simply refuse to be bottle fed during the day. What to Do Once the baby has reached six months of age, parents should consider slowly and gradually discouraging night-time feeding. This can be done by simply encouraging the baby to feed more during the day. Content Source Featured Image Source

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Bottle Feeding: How much Feed Your Baby Needs / Pinterest

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Best Bottle Feeding Positions For Your Baby

1. Cradle him Place the baby's head in the crook of your arm, and your other arm around the baby or underneath him. Lift the arm with baby's head slightly so he's in a semi-upright position. You never want to feed the baby when he's lying down, the formula can flow into the middle ear, causing an infection. 2. Sit him up  This position works well for babies with painful gas or acid reflux. Sit Baby on your lap so he's in a more upright position. Let his head rest on your chest or in the crook of your arm. 3. Place him in your lap  This works when you're lying or sitting down with your legs propped up. Place the baby on top of your lap, with his head resting on your knees and his feet on your stomach. This is an excellent feeding position because you and your baby are facing one another, allowing you to make plenty of eye contact. 4. Tilt the bottle  When feeding your infant, tilt the bottle so the milk completely fills the nipple. This decreases the amount of air that your baby is likely to take in, lessening her chances of having painful gas. 5. Use a Boppy  Some babies feed well when lying in a Boppy pillow. It keeps your little one's head slightly elevated and is really useful when your arms are tired. Just be sure to hold your baby's bottle for him, you never want to prop the bottle up and leave him eating unattended. Content Source Featured Image Source

Your Milk Vs Formula / SCDHEC

Benefits of Breastfeeding for Baby and Mother

Bottle Feed : How Much Does your Baby Need

Breast to bottle: Quick tips for a smooth transition

Even if your baby is breastfeeding now, you may eventually want to supplement with or transition to a bottle. The baby may find the transition from breast to bottle feeding difficult in the beginning. However, with your constant love, support, and efforts the baby will accept this change. Introducing or changing feeding methods can often be difficult. The following tips given below can help make the transition easier for both you and your baby. Pick the right time: Introduce a bottle an hour or so after a feeding, not when your baby is hungry. Have the right equipment: Experiment with bottles and nipples to find the ones that work best. Although there’s no “right” nipple shape, the nipple’s hole can make a difference. If it’s too big, it can cause your baby to gag; and if it’s too small, your baby may have to work too hard to draw out liquid. Know when to seek help: Ask for bottle-feeding help from someone else (who doesn’t smell like you). A baby can easily smell his mother, even from a distance. Have your partner, a grandparent, or a caregiver give bottle feeding a try. Offer a sample: If you’re pumping milk into a bottle, put a few drops on your baby’s lips as a sample. Some moms start by pumping breast milk to deliver via a bottle—or even mix breast milk and formula together in the bottle. This helps babies adjust to this new method before changing over to formula exclusively. Watch your baby for cues: If a bottle-feeding session isn’t going well, it’s OK to stop and take a break. Sometimes it’s best to try again later, after your baby has calmed down. Let baby lead the way: As he drinks from a bottle, give your baby the opportunity to pause and restart, just as you did with breastfeeding. This will help him realize that the two feeding processes are similar. Feel the love: Both bottle feeding and breastfeeding provide an opportunity for you and your baby to snuggle and relax. Feed your baby just as you did from your breast—with lots of skin and eye contact and affection. Content source Featured image source

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