FormulaFeeding

The action of feeding a baby with formula, as opposed to breast milk

Ask anything about formulafeeding

Advantages and Disadvantages of Bottle Feeding/Formula Feeding

Mothers have to make so many decisions on how to raise their children and what can give them the best start in life. Perhaps the first choice you need to make is whether to bottle feed or breastfeed your new-born.   While most pediatricians will agree when it comes to baby feeding that “breast is best”, there are of course times when it's just not practical, or possible, to breastfeed. In such cases, the option of bottle feeding can come as a blessed substitute for mothers.   If you're considering bottle feeding, this information may help you have a better picture of the benefits and the downsides, so that you can make a more well-rounded decision.   Advantages of Bottle Feeding & Formula Feeding Here are some of the advantages and benefits of bottle feeding and formula feeding: • When feeding your baby with formula feed, you can measure exactly how much food your little one is getting per feeding. This is useful in understanding how much food is necessary for your baby to feel full. • Bottle feeding helps parents share the work of feeding. Babies who are breastfed usually need to eat every two or three hours. When it comes to bottle feeding, since the bottle does the work, mum doesn't have to be the one on call at all times. Bottle feeding allows anyone in the family to help out when it comes to feeding little Junior. • Mums who choose to bottle feed their babies don't have to worry about altering their diet to meet the needs of their baby. Caffeine, alcohol, and calorie intake are more flexible. Nursing mums are advised to take in about 500 calories per day, which can make weight loss difficult. • Formula-fed babies will generally eat less often than breastfed babies because baby formulas take longer to digest than mother's milk.   Disadvantages of Bottle Feeding & Formula Feeding Here are some of the disadvantages you may experience if you decide to feed your child with a bottle and formula feed: • Certain studies suggest that mums who breastfeed are less likely to develop breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and osteoporosis later in life.   • Some research has seen mothers who bottle feed are more likely to experience postpartum depression. Though the exact cause of this is up to considerable debate, studies do suggest that mothers who breastfeed are less prone to experience postpartum depression than mothers who don’t.   • Studies have suggested that women who breastfeed are less likely to develop Type 2 Diabetes later in life.    • Breast milk contains more nutrients than formula and helps promote brain growth and development. Breast milk also helps improve your baby's immunity. • Breast milk is easier on the digestive system of a new-born than formula is. • Nursing provides comfort to your little one and can help calm him when he is upset, sick, or dehydrated. Nursing also strengthens the bond between mother and child. • Bottle feeding is less convenient during midnight feeding sessions as it requires your full attention to get up and prepare the bottle. • Formula food can be an expense. • Breast milk contains infection-fighting antibodies that formula food can't duplicate.   If you choose to breastfeed your baby, try to continue until about 12 months. If you wean your baby before 12 months, avoid giving them cow's milk feedings, but instead iron-fortified infant formula to replace the iron intake from breast milk. In most cases, the most ideal nutrition for your little one is breast milk, as it provides the ideal nutrition that is necessary for your baby's development, especially during the first six months.   However, should you decide that bottle feeding works out better for you, then go for it guilt-free! There are advantages and benefits to bottle feeding. Remember, when it comes to how you feed your baby, nobody knows your little one better than you.   Whether you opt for the bottle or breast, the choice is entirely your own. Content Source Featured Image Source

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Avoiding Breastfeeding Problems / Peachymama

7 Common Bottle Feeding Problems

There are various reasons for a baby to refuse bottle feeding; the good news is that most of these reasons are behavioral in nature and can be addressed, sometimes, by simply observing the baby for vital clues. Given below are some common problems associated with bottle feeding and their solutions. 1. Misinterpreting Hunger The most common and the most easily correctable problem related to bottle feeding is the misinterpretation of hunger by new moms. Babies tend to suck on their thumbs and other objects for various reasons other than being hungry. A baby may suck on things out of anxiety, boredom or simply being tired; many mothers misinterpret this reflex of hunger. Attempting to feed the baby based on this behaviour can result in the baby refusing to feed simply because it is not hungry. What to Do If the baby is refusing to feed, do not force it, accept that you may have misinterpreted and wait till the baby gives more clear clues of being hungry. 2. Misinterpreting/Miscalculating Feeding Amount The second most common and easily correctable problem with regards to bottle feeding is miscalculating the amount of milk or baby formula a baby really needs. Sometimes parents make calculations based on expert opinion or simply guesstimate their baby’s daily requirement of milk or formula. And sometimes professionals make the mistake of not properly calculating requirements based on changing requirements as the baby is growing. Whatever the case may be, if a baby has had enough and is not hungry, it will refuse to feed. What to Do Commonly estimated feeding suggestions are only approximate figures and can vary from baby to baby. Some babies feed more than others and some less. As noted above, wait till the baby gives more clear clues of being hungry. 3. Distracted Baby Humans are naturally curious beings; this curiosity is apparent as early as four months from being born. Once a baby is four months or older, his curiosity makes him take more interest in everything around him. Other children playing, pets acting up, and even music and television can distract a baby and make it lose focus on feeding. What to Do If you feel your baby is distracted, turn of all sound sources such as television, music, etc., better still is to find a quiet room without people, children or pets. 4. Tired Baby A baby may refuse to bottle feed simply because it is tired. A baby that has not slept enough will tire quickly; while it is true that a hungry baby may sleep less, it is equally true for a baby deprived of sleep to avoid feeding. It will throw up a fuss, cry or fall asleep while feeding. What to Do Seek expert opinion on sleeping and feeding schedules, or create a balanced schedule to avoid overlapping sleeping time with feeding time. Also, ensure that your baby is getting enough sleep and try to feed the baby before it gets tired. 5. Individual Feeding Pattern Like all mammals, humans tend to display individual personality types, behavioral patterns, and feeding habits from very early in their lives. Some babies like to consume large amounts of food at one go; others like to feed a little at a time but more often during the day. If your baby is frequently refusing to bottle feed, then it is prudent to consider that you may not have fully understood his/her individual feeding pattern. Constantly feeding a baby can put added stress on the mother. Ideally, a baby’s individual pattern should be respected, but if needed, an attempt can be made to gently and gradually encourage a change. What to Do A baby should be encouraged to feed much of what food it needs in about forty minutes, but given individual patterns, this should not be forced. Stop if the baby does not wish to continue. Another approach to a frequent feeding pattern is to try and create longer intervals between feeds. Encourage play or take the baby for an outing, or let it nap to gradually increase the time intervals between feeds. 6. Bottle Feeding Aversion Some babies may develop an allergy to milk protein or may develop intolerance to milk or formula. There are many factors that may induce feeding aversions, such as certain physical or oral problems and reflux. Fortunately, most feeding aversions are a result of behavioral issues than actual physical problems or medical conditions. What to Do A feeding aversion can be a very complicated problem with no easy or straightforward solutions. If all else fails, then the only solution is to consult experts to try and identify the root cause of this aversion. 7. Night Feeding New-born babies need to be fed frequently and even at night. Avoid feeding a baby, that has reached six months, at night. If night feeding continues beyond six months it could result in a formula fed baby refusing bottle. This is no cause for alarm; it may simply be that the baby relies on feeding to fall asleep. Night time feeding will not harm the baby, but given that a baby needs only a certain amount of food every twenty-four hours, she may simply refuse to be bottle fed during the day. What to Do Once the baby has reached six months of age, parents should consider slowly and gradually discouraging night-time feeding. This can be done by simply encouraging the baby to feed more during the day. Content Source Featured Image Source

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Bottle Feeding: How much Feed Your Baby Needs / Pinterest

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Best Bottle Feeding Positions For Your Baby

1. Cradle him Place the baby's head in the crook of your arm, and your other arm around the baby or underneath him. Lift the arm with baby's head slightly so he's in a semi-upright position. You never want to feed the baby when he's lying down, the formula can flow into the middle ear, causing an infection. 2. Sit him up  This position works well for babies with painful gas or acid reflux. Sit Baby on your lap so he's in a more upright position. Let his head rest on your chest or in the crook of your arm. 3. Place him in your lap  This works when you're lying or sitting down with your legs propped up. Place the baby on top of your lap, with his head resting on your knees and his feet on your stomach. This is an excellent feeding position because you and your baby are facing one another, allowing you to make plenty of eye contact. 4. Tilt the bottle  When feeding your infant, tilt the bottle so the milk completely fills the nipple. This decreases the amount of air that your baby is likely to take in, lessening her chances of having painful gas. 5. Use a Boppy  Some babies feed well when lying in a Boppy pillow. It keeps your little one's head slightly elevated and is really useful when your arms are tired. Just be sure to hold your baby's bottle for him, you never want to prop the bottle up and leave him eating unattended. Content Source Featured Image Source

Your Milk Vs Formula / SCDHEC

Benefits of Breastfeeding for Baby and Mother

Bottle Feed : How Much Does your Baby Need

Is it normal for a newborn to poop after every feeding?

As a new mom, you may be concerned and anxious to see your baby passing a stool after every feed. You may be wondering if it is normal for your baby to poop after every feed or is your baby pooping too much? Just relax because it’s normal for babies to poop after every feed. Pooping after every meal is actually a good sign that your baby is getting plenty of milk. To know more on this, read below: Is It Normal For My Baby To Poop After Every Feed? Yes, it is perfectly normal for babies to poop after every feeding session. Some babies poop after every feed and some after every 3-5 days. In fact pooping after every feed indicates that your baby is in good health and getting enough milk. The frequency of stools can slow down between 3 to 6 weeks of birth as your baby’s stomach grows and she settles into a routine. But then some babies still continue pooping after every feed for as long as one year. Every baby is different. So, if your baby’s bowel movements are fairly consistent and he is his usual cheerful self, there is nothing to be concerned about frequent poops. Do Breastfed Babies Poop More? Pooping after every feed is common among breastfed babies. Breastfed babies poop more frequently than formula-fed babies. This is because breast milk contains immunoglobulins. These are substances produced by the body’s immune system. They also work as a natural laxative and are very helpful for clearing meconium in the initial days. They also contribute to frequent pooping and lack of constipation in breastfed babies. It’s quite normal for some babies to have fewer bowel movements after 6 weeks. There may be cases where your baby may be pooping only once a week. But there is nothing to be alarmed about. How Many Times A Day Do Formula Fed Babies Poop? Formula fed babies generally pass fewer stools than breastfed babies. This is for the simple reason that formula can be harder to digest as a result takes longer to pass through your baby’s system. But there may be instances where your formula fed babies will be pooping after every feed especially during the early weeks. How many times a day a formula fed baby poops differs from baby to baby and also changes as your baby grows. For some formula fed babies, during the first month, three bowel moments are considered normal while for others the frequency can go upto 5 poops a day. Between 1-2 months, the frequency of bowel movements changes in babies. So now your baby might just be passing one stool every day to one every other day. For some babies, passing stool once every two days is also considered normal. Just keep in mind that as long as the poop has the consistency of peanut butter, there is nothing to worry about. How Often Does A Baby Poop After Starting Solids? Once your baby starts solids around six months, the frequency of his poop will be affected. The frequency, color, and smell of the poop will change once your baby is on solid feed. Your baby may poop several times in a day or he may go without a bowel movement for several days. We can attribute this to their immature digestive system. When your baby’s system is matured enough to process the solid food efficiently, you will notice that the bowel movement of your baby returns to normal once again. Content source Featured image source

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Breast to bottle: Quick tips for a smooth transition

Even if your baby is breastfeeding now, you may eventually want to supplement with or transition to a bottle. The baby may find the transition from breast to bottle feeding difficult in the beginning. However, with your constant love, support, and efforts the baby will accept this change. Introducing or changing feeding methods can often be difficult. The following tips given below can help make the transition easier for both you and your baby. Pick the right time: Introduce a bottle an hour or so after a feeding, not when your baby is hungry. Have the right equipment: Experiment with bottles and nipples to find the ones that work best. Although there’s no “right” nipple shape, the nipple’s hole can make a difference. If it’s too big, it can cause your baby to gag; and if it’s too small, your baby may have to work too hard to draw out liquid. Know when to seek help: Ask for bottle-feeding help from someone else (who doesn’t smell like you). A baby can easily smell his mother, even from a distance. Have your partner, a grandparent, or a caregiver give bottle feeding a try. Offer a sample: If you’re pumping milk into a bottle, put a few drops on your baby’s lips as a sample. Some moms start by pumping breast milk to deliver via a bottle—or even mix breast milk and formula together in the bottle. This helps babies adjust to this new method before changing over to formula exclusively. Watch your baby for cues: If a bottle-feeding session isn’t going well, it’s OK to stop and take a break. Sometimes it’s best to try again later, after your baby has calmed down. Let baby lead the way: As he drinks from a bottle, give your baby the opportunity to pause and restart, just as you did with breastfeeding. This will help him realize that the two feeding processes are similar. Feel the love: Both bottle feeding and breastfeeding provide an opportunity for you and your baby to snuggle and relax. Feed your baby just as you did from your breast—with lots of skin and eye contact and affection. Content source Featured image source

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