Burping Your Baby

Burping helps to get rid of some of the air that babies tend to swallow during feeding

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How to Burp Your Baby: Basics, Tips and Positions

Does your baby fuss and get cranky during or after feedings? It’s likely because she's swallowed a bit of air with that milk, making her feel uncomfortably full. Try these burping tips and positions to bring up the air and make space for baby’s full meal. Why do I need to burp my baby? It’s important to burp baby at each feeding. When your baby drinks, she can't help but swallow a little air along with her breast milk or formula. But having those air bubbles trapped in her tummy can make her feel uncomfortable and full before she's really finished eating. That’s why burping baby to bring up any excess air that’s accumulated is such an important part of the feeding process. Tips on burping baby A couple of tips to help you burp your baby successfully: 1. Protect your clothes by always keeping a burp cloth or bib between your outfit and baby’s mouth. 2. Keep a cloth, diaper or bib handy in case baby spits up. 3. A gentle pat or rub may get the burp up for most babies, but some need a slightly firmer hand. 4. Focus on the left side of baby’s back, which is where your little one's stomach is located. 5. Fussing in the middle of a feeding may be due to discomfort from swallowed air, and continued fussing causes her to swallow more air leading to more crankiness and possibly spitting up. Instead, try burping baby right away to see if it’s an air bubble in her tummy that’s causing her to protest. What are the best positions for burping baby?  There are three basic ways to burp a baby: on your shoulder, face-down on your lap or sitting up. It’s a good idea to try all three to see which gets the job done best for your little one. 1. On your shoulder: Hold your baby firmly against your shoulder. Support her bottom with one hand, and pat or rub her back with the other. 2. Face-down on your lap: Place your baby tummy-down across your lap (her stomach will be on one of your legs, her head on the other, turned sideways). With one hand securely holding baby, pat or rub her back with the other. 3. Sitting up: Hold your baby in a seated position on your lap, leaning slightly forward. Support baby’s head and chest with one arm while you pat or rub with the other. 4. Walking: Once your baby has good head control, you can try holding her upright in front of you, facing out, while you stand and walk. Put one hand under her bottom and the other arm across her tummy to apply light pressure. The motion may help give an additional release of any trapped air bubbles. How often should I burp my baby?  How often you burp baby depends on how you’re feeding her: When bottle-feeding, burp baby at least once, about halfway through feeding, or more often if she seems fussy or is taking a long time.  When breastfeeding, burp when you switch from one breast to the other to make room for more milk (keep in mind that a baby who’s swallowed air may stop eating and refuse to switch breasts simply because she feels uncomfortably full). Is your new born managing only one breast at a time? Burp mid-feed on the same breast. Content Source  

6 home remedies of gas relief for babies

  Gas in the stomach can be the air swallowed through the mouth, or it can be the gas naturally produced by bacteria within the gastrointestinal tract. A baby can develop a gassy tummy due to any of the following reasons : Drinking formula too fast: Babies who breastfeed feed at a controlled pace, but formula-fed infants tend to gulp down a lot more when the bottle is held vertically into the mouth. This leads to ingestion of surplus air that gets trapped within the stomach and causes bloating. Poor latch to the nipple: Babies who do not latch properly to the breast or bottle nipple tend to leave a considerable gap between their mouth and the nipple. This gap can permeate the surrounding air, which the baby swallows along with the milk. Formula mixing and type: Some babies may develop gas after consuming a particular kind of formula. If you mix formula by shaking it in a bottle, then it can infuse a lot of gas in the liquid, that eventually ends up in the baby’s stomach. Not burping the baby between feeds: You should burp your baby between feeds since they cannot do it themselves. Leaving the baby without burping leads to accumulation of gas inside the belly. Too much crying: If the baby had been crying a lot, then they could inhale a lot of air that accumulates within the stomach and causes gassiness. Mother’s diet: What you eat is what you pass to your baby through breast milk. Certain food items may contain compounds that can get into breast milk and cause gas in babies. Eating various solid foods: Older infants and toddlers eat a wide variety of food. Bacteria within the gut can produce excess gas when digesting specific food items. What Are The Symptoms Of A Gassy Baby?   A baby with gas in the tummy displays the following symptoms : Fussiness and irritability: It is probably the first sign you notice, especially after feeding the baby. Your baby will inexplicably become fussy and irritable while otherwise being alright. Bloating: A baby’s bloated belly may indicate trapped gas. The belly will also be firm to touch. Pulling legs towards tummy: The baby will try to relieve any discomfort caused by bloating by pulling the legs upwards. Rubbing belly: Infants may also rub their belly while older infants and toddlers may hold or point towards the tummy to express discomfort. Gurgling noises from the stomach: If the surroundings are quiet, then you may even hear gurgling sounds from the baby’s belly. It could be a result of gas moving inside the gastrointestinal tract. It is most likely to occur sometime after a feed. Crying while squirming: If the gas causes severe bloating, then a baby may cry and squirm due to the discomfort. Sometimes, gassiness and bloating can cause extreme discomfort, warranting medical attention. Home Remedies For Gas In Babies A few natural remedies can work effectively as preventive measures for gas among infants. Parents must try the following steps at home when the baby displays symptoms of gas: Burp: Timely burping after a feed prevents accumulation of gas in the baby’s gastrointestinal tract. After every feed, hold the baby in your arms such that their head rests on your shoulder. Gently tap and rub the baby’s back between the shoulders till you hear a burp. Make sure to place a cloth on your shoulder since babies normally tend to regurgitate small amounts of liquid from their stomach. Basic baby exercises: One of the best exercises for gas in babies is bicycle kicks. Lay your baby on the back on a soft surface. Move their legs up and down on a regular basis. The exercise will help your baby relieve the gas and feel better.   Give tummy time: Experts suggest that regular tummy time improves upper body strength among infants. Adequate abdominal muscle strength allows the gut to relieve itself from gas. The pressure on the belly during tummy time also helps in the removal of gas. Tummy massage: Gentle clockwise massage around the navel stimulates the movement of food and gas through the gastrointestinal tract. You can consult a paediatrician or a certified paediatric massage therapist to learn specific massage techniques to relieve gas in babies. Firm nipple latch is important: Check if your baby is latching right to prevent them from gulping air while they feed. The baby is holding on right when their mouth covers the entire nipple.  A good latch also causes suckling sounds, which let you know that the baby is feeding properly. Babies with some orthodontic problems tend to have a tough time with nipple latching. Get your baby checked by the doctor if you feel they could have a problem. You can also try different bottle nipples. A small or big bottle nipple could cause a baby to suction air. Do not let the baby lie down with a bottle placed vertically in their mouth. Instead, control the flow of the milk by using techniques like paced bottle feeding. Switch formulas: If you suspect the current formula is causing gas, then try another. Sometimes the baby may have gas if they have lactose intolerance. If the symptoms of gas persist for long, you should consult a doctor. Can Solid Food Cause Gas In Babies? Yes. Some foods can make the gastrointestinal tract of a baby more susceptible to the production of gas: VEGETABLES FRUITS CEREAL AND GRAINS MILK PRODUCTS Cabbage Pears Cereal Cheese Cauliflower Apples Whole wheat Yogurt Broccoli Peaches Bran   Onions       Beans – nearly all types       The baby can eat most of the above foods, except milk products, on attaining the age of six months . Do keep in mind that solids are essential for the baby to meet their recommended dietary allowance (RDA). So instead of avoiding them totally, decrease the portion size and serve them during multiple feeds in a day. In case of foods such as wheat, you can consult a doctor if there is too much gas since it could be an indicator of allergy. While food eaten by the baby is a plausible cause for gas, what the mother eats may also lead to gassiness in breastfed infants.   Can The Mother’s Diet Cause Gas In ABreastfeeding Baby? Yes. Usually, gassy vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and beans can affect the baby. Some babies may develop gas when the mother eats spicy foods. The effect of the foods eaten may vary from mother to mother, so watch out for what you eat and how it affects your baby to determine the ideal diet when you breastfeed. Pediatric experts state that unless your baby develops gassiness within six hours of you eating a specific food, there is no need to stop eating it (11). Remember, some gas in babies is normal. You pass the nutrients you get through fruit and vegetables to your baby. Therefore, avoid eating a food item if your baby has too much trouble, but pause consumption albeit temporarily. Content source  Featured image source

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How to calm your Crying Baby

How can I cure my newborn’s hiccups?

Seeing your baby grow can be called as the most beautiful thing in the world. During this process, you get to hear your newborn’s little coos, tiny yawns, laughters, cries etc. However, sometimes a few sounds may leave you worried and you find it hard to conclude if it is normal for your baby. When your baby hiccups, the sound may appear to be cute but you might be wondering if it is normal. You will be glad to hear that it is perfectly normal for your baby to hiccup. Baby and newborn’s hiccups do not cause any harm and just one sign of your baby’s growth and development.  If you want to cure your newborn’s hiccups, the following tips given below may prove helpful: Take a break and burp: Taking a break from a feeding to burp your baby may help get rid of the hiccups, since burping can get rid of excess gas that may be causing the hiccups. Burping will also help because it places your baby into an upright position. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests burping your bottle-fed baby after every 2 to 3 ounces. If your baby is breastfed, you should burp them after they switch breasts. Use a pacifier: Infant hiccups don’t always start from a feeding. When your baby starts to hiccup on their own, try allowing them to suck on a pacifier, as this will help relax the diaphragm and may help stop the bout of hiccups. Let them stop on their own: More often than not, your baby’s hiccups will stop on their own. If they aren’t bothering your baby, then you can just let them run their course. If you don’t interfere and your baby’s hiccups don’t stop on their own, let their doctor know. While rare, it’s possible for hiccups to be a sign of a more serious medical issue. Try gripe water: If your baby seems to be in discomfort because of their hiccups, then you may want to try feeding them gripe water. Gripe water is a combination of herbs and water that is believed by some to help with colic and other intestinal discomforts. The types of herbs can vary and may include ginger, fennel, chamomile, and cinnamon. Though gripe water has not been shown to help with hiccups in babies, it’s a fairly low-risk product. Before you give your baby anything new, it’s always recommended that you discuss it with your baby’s doctor. Content source Featured image source    

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Burping, hiccups and spitting up

Young babies naturally fuss and get cranky when they swallow air during feedings. Although this occurs in both breastfed and bottle-fed infants, it's seen more often with the bottle. When it happens, you're better off stopping the feeding than letting your infant fuss and nurse at the same time. This continued fussing will cause her to swallow even more air, which will only increase her discomfort and may make her spit up. A much better strategy is to burp her frequently, even if she shows no discomfort. The pause and the change of position alone will slow her gulping and reduce the amount of air she takes in. How to Burp a Baby Hold the baby upright with her head on your shoulder, supporting her head and back while you gently pat her back with your other hand. If she still hasn't burped after several minutes, continue feeding her and don't worry; no baby burps every time. When she's finished, burp her again and keep her in an upright position for 10 to 15 minutes so she doesn't spit up. Sit the baby on your lap, supporting her chest and head with one hand while patting her back with your other hand. Lay the baby on your lap with her back up. Support her head so it is higher than her chest, and gently pat or rotate your hand on her back. Hiccups Most babies hiccup from time to time. This usually will bother you more than your infant, but if hiccups occur during a feeding, they may distress her. So change her position and try to get her to burp or relax. Wait until the hiccups are gone to resume feeding. If they don't disappear on their own in five to ten minutes, a few sucks of some water should stop them. If your baby gets hiccups often, try to feed her when she's calm and before she's extremely hungry. This will reduce the likelihood of hiccups during the feeding.   Spitting Up Spitting up is another common occurrence during infancy. Sometimes spitting up means the baby has eaten more than her stomach can hold; sometimes she spits up while burping or drooling. Although it may be a bit messy, it's no cause for concern. It almost never involves choking, coughing, discomfort, or danger to your child, even if it occurs while she's sleeping. Some babies spit up more than others, but most are out of this phase by the time they are sitting. A few "heavy spitters" will continue until they start to walk or are weaned to a cup. Some may continue throughout their first year. You should be able to tell the difference easily between normal spitting up and true vomiting. Unlike spitting up, which most babies don't even seem to notice, vomiting is forceful and usually causes great distress and discomfort for your child. It generally occurs soon after a meal and produces a much greater volume than spitting up. If your baby vomits on a regular basis (one or more times a day), consult your paediatrician. Content source Featured image source

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