Body Changes

The various transformations that a woman's body undergoes during pregnancy

Ask anything about body changes

Ek funny SA question for all preggies Kis kis ki sakal pregnancy k time main bht gandi c ho gyi hai Mean ESA lgta h face bht dwn ho gya h colour bht dark ho gya gnde se dark circlesz,🙂😭🤣🥰

Early Symptoms of Pregnancy

When you’re trying to get pregnant, and you just can’t wait to hear the good news, just watch out for the following early signs of pregnancy. Your periods should be late by a week and most probably a urine/home pregnancy test will give you a positive result. Though a lot of changes are taking place in your body, nobody else gets to know that you’re pregnant.    Most women start experiencing some or all of the following symptoms of pregnancy: Missed Periods – This is the surest sign of pregnancy and confirms the pregnancy. Nausea – You’ll feel nauseated mostly in the morning but it could happen during the day also. This also happens due to an increase in the level of progesterone hormone in the body. Fatigue – You’ll feel fatigued all day even if you don’t move around much. This is due to the hormonal changes that take place in your body. You may even feel dizzy at times. Breast changes – Breasts become sore and tender and grow in size. The production of milk starts during pregnancy. Even the skin around the nipples and the nipples/areolas start darkening as they prepare themselves for lactation. Cramps in the lower back – Often mistaken as a sign of periods, these cramps are actually caused due to implantation. Enhanced sense of smell – Many women notice that their sense of smell becomes heightened during pregnancy and they can smell things from too far away. Mood swings – This is another weird symptom of pregnancy and is caused by the increased levels of progesterone in the body. Need to pass urine more often – The gallbladder experiences a lot of pressure due to the growing uterus and makes you want to use pee more often. Headaches – Headaches during pregnancy are common due to stress, increasing levels of hormones and due to a rise in the volume of blood in the body. The next step is to get an appointment with your gynecologist and have a blood test to confirm the pregnancy. The gynecologist might also perform an ultrasound and may make you listen to your munchkin’s heartbeat.  Your medical practitioner will take many more details such as blood pressure, weight and medical history and any allergies. She may even check your abdomen. Your gynecologist will prescribe you multivitamins and advice you on what to eat and what not to eat. Should you have any doubts or notice anything unusual, consult your medical practitioner immediately.

Causes and prevention of varicose veins during pregnancy

Varicose veins, also known as varicoses or varicosities, occur when your veins become enlarged, dilated, and overfilled with blood. Varicose veins typically appear swollen and raised, and have a bluish-purple or red color. They are often painful. The condition is very common, especially in women. Around 25 percent of all adults have varicose veins. In most cases, varicose veins appear on the lower legs. Causes of varicose veins Varicose veins occur when veins aren’t functioning properly. Veins have one-way valves that prevent blood from flowing backward. When these valves fail, blood begins to collect in the veins rather than continuing toward your heart. The veins then enlarge. Varicose veins often affect the legs. The veins there are the farthest from your heart, and gravity makes it harder for the blood to flow upward. Some potential causes for varicose veins include: Pregnancy Menopause Age over 50 Standing for long periods of time Obesity Family history of varicose veins Symptoms of varicose veins The primary symptoms of varicose veins are highly visible, misshapen veins, usually on your legs. You may also have pain, swelling, heaviness, and achiness over or around the enlarged veins. In some cases, you can develop swelling and discoloration. In severe cases, the veins can bleed significantly, and ulcers can form. Diagnosing varicose veins Your doctor will likely examine your legs and visible veins while you’re sitting or standing to diagnose varicose veins. They may ask you about any pain or symptoms you’re having. Your doctor may also want to do an ultrasound to check your blood flow. This is a noninvasive test that uses high-frequency sound waves. It allows your doctor to see how blood is flowing in your veins. Home remedies Measures can be taken at home to improve pain and prevent varicose veins from worsening. These measures include the following given below:  Exercising Losing weight Raising the legs Avoiding prolonged standing or sitting There are also many over-the-counter natural treatments, usually topical creams and emollients. These can help soothe pain, and improve comfort and they may improve the general appearance of varicose veins. Prevention: To reduce the risk of developing varicose veins you need to do the following:   Exercise regularly  Maintain a healthy weight Avoid standing still for too long Do not sit with the legs crossed Sit or sleep with your feet raised on a pillow Anyone who has to stand for their job should try to move around at least once every 30 minutes  Content source Featured image source  

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How to deal with hemorrhoids and varicose veins during pregnancy

Hemorrhoids and varicose veins might seem to be two different, unrelated problems, but they are actually quite similar. And, many women, especially those in the third trimester of pregnancy, have them. Both hemorrhoids and varicose veins can be defined as swollen, twisted veins. These veins can often be spotted in the legs, but they also can form in other parts of your body. When they form in the rectum, they are called hemorrhoids. What causes hemorrhoids and varicose veins in pregnancy? Normally, veins have one-way valves to help keep blood flowing toward the heart. Pressure or weakening of these valves allows blood to back up and pool in the veins. This causes them to enlarge and swell. Hemorrhoids result when rectal veins enlarge. Varicose veins occur when veins of the legs swell. Many changes in pregnancy can increase the risk of hemorrhoids and varicose veins, such as: Increased blood volume, which enlarges the veins The heavy weight of the growing baby, which presses on the large blood vessels in the pelvis, altering blood flow Hormone changes affecting blood vessels, which can slow the return of blood to the heart and cause the smaller veins in the pelvis and legs to swell Hemorrhoids can get worse with pushing or straining, especially with constipation. Being overweight and having hemorrhoids before pregnancy can also make them worse. Pushing during delivery tends to worsen hemorrhoids, too. Varicose veins tend to run in families. Sitting or standing in one position for a long time may force the veins to work harder to pump blood to the heart. This can result in swollen, varicose veins and can also worsen existing hemorrhoids. How are hemorrhoids and varicose veins in pregnancy treated? Hemorrhoids in pregnancy are a short-term problem, and they get better after your baby is born. Still, there are some things you can do to relieve the discomfort: To relieve pain, sit in a tub or take bath several times a day in plain, warm water for about 10 minutes each time. Use ice packs or cold compresses to reduce swelling. Ask your healthcare provider about creams or other medicines, such as stool softeners, that are safe to use during pregnancy. It’s important to prevent constipation by including lots of fiber and fluids in your diet. Also, try not to strain with bowel movements, and avoid sitting for a long time. Regular exercises, which involve squeezing and relaxing the muscles in your vaginal and rectal area, can help improve muscle tone. Most varicose veins that develop during pregnancy get better within the first year after birth. But for now, limit your standing or sitting for a long time without a break, and try not to cross your legs. Also try to raise your legs and feet whenever you’re sitting or lying down. Avoid tight clothing around your waist, thighs, and legs, as it can worsen varicose veins. Be sure to check with your healthcare provider if your symptoms worsen or you have excessive bleeding from hemorrhoids. And, remember that these problems are usually short-term and get better after delivery with time and treatment. Content source Featured image source

A working woman's guide to pregnancy hormonal changes

The hormonal and physiological changes that come with pregnancy are unique. Pregnant women experience sudden and dramatic increases in estrogen and progesterone. They also experience changes in the amount and function of a number of other hormones. These changes don’t just affect mood. They can also: create the “glow” of pregnancy significantly aid in the development of the fetus alter the physical impact of exercise and physical activity on the body Estrogen and progesterone changes Estrogen and progesterone are the chief pregnancy hormones. A woman will produce more estrogen during one pregnancy than throughout her entire life when not pregnant. Pregnancy hormones and exercise injuries While these hormones are absolutely critical for a successful pregnancy, they also can make exercise more difficult. Because the ligaments are looser, pregnant women may be at greater risk for sprains and strains of the ankle or knee. Weight gain, fluid retention, and physical activity Weight gain in pregnant women increases the workload on the body from any physical activity. This additional weight and gravity slow down the circulation of blood and bodily fluids, particularly in the lower limbs.  Sensory changes Pregnancy can dramatically alter how a woman experiences the world through sight, taste, and smell. Breast and cervical changes Hormonal changes, which begin in the first trimester, will lead to many physiological changes throughout the body. These changes help prepare the mother’s body for pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. Hair and nail changes Many women experience changes in hair and nail growth during pregnancy. Hormone changes can sometimes cause excessive hair shedding or hair loss. This is especially true in women with a family history of female alopecia. Stretch marks Stretch marks (striae gravidarum) are perhaps the most well-known skin change of pregnancy. They’re caused by a combination of physical stretching of the skin and the effects of hormone changes on the skin’s elasticity.  Blood pressure and exercise There are two types of circulatory changes that may have an impact on exercise during pregnancy. Pregnancy hormones can suddenly affect the tone in blood vessels. A sudden loss of tone may result in the feeling of dizziness and perhaps even a brief loss of consciousness. This is because the loss of pressure sends less blood to the brain and central nervous system. Dizziness and fainting Another form of dizziness can result from lying flat on the back. This dizziness is more common after 24 weeks. However, it can happen earlier during multi-fetal pregnancies or with conditions that increase amniotic fluid Respiratory and metabolic changes Pregnant women experience increases in the amount of oxygen they transport in their blood. This is because of increased demand for blood and the dilation of blood vessels. This growth forces increases in metabolic rates during pregnancy, requiring women to up energy intake and use caution during periods of physical exertion. Body temperature changes An increase in basal body temperature is one of the first hints of pregnancy. A slightly higher core temperature will be maintained through the duration of pregnancy. Women also have a greater need of water during pregnancy. They can be at higher risk of hyperthermia and dehydration without caution to exercise safely and remain hydrated. Dehydration Most women who exercise for 20 to 30 minutes or who exercise during hot and humid weather will sweat. In pregnant women, loss of bodily fluids from sweat can decrease the blood flow to the uterus, the muscles, and some organs. The developing fetus needs a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients carried through the blood, so injury may result from a lack of fluid.

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I'm 9 weeks pregnant, during night I wake up atleast 2-3 times for urination. Is it normal? Please suggest

Hello mom's.. Mera 19 week running hai or Mera baby bump dikhne Lga hai , kapde bhi tight ho rahe hai, but navel se uper ka portion bhi badh Raha hai, aysa hota hai Kya..... Pls pls answer

Mai jb bhi uthti hun chalti hun to vagina me pain horaha hai..aur pressure feel horaha h.. Abhi to 7 months hi abhi se itna pain .. Mujje kya karna chahye

Which is the best product to remove stretch marks after delivery?

Meri baby ki Belly button dekhio itti badi b kya karu bataon na koi jaldi yaar

This is how your breast will change during pregnancy

Early Signs Many women find that their breasts feel sensitive very early in pregnancy. (For some women, this is the first hint that they're pregnant.) If your breasts tingle or feel tender to the touch, that’s normal. It’s a common side effect from all of the extra hormones running through your body. If you notice any lumps at any point, though, tell your doctor, so you can find out what it is. Color Changes The hormones in your system may change the way your breasts look while you’re pregnant. Many women find that the areola -- the area around the nipple -- gets darker during pregnancy. This is normal. The color may or may not lighten after you give birth. You may notice new blue veins just beneath the surface of your breast skin. This, too, is normal. It happens because the body boosts its blood supply to your breasts when you’re pregnant. New Size You’ll probably want to buy some new bras, because your breasts may go up a size or two while you’re pregnant. Stretch Marks Your growing belly isn’t the only place where you may get stretch marks. They may appear on your breasts as they grow larger. The growing may make your skin itch, too. Moisturizer or lotion may soothe the itching, but there’s no product that can make stretch marks disappear. They should fade, though, after your baby is born.  

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7 important things to do in the second trimester of pregnancy

The second trimester is a special period for to-be-moms.  During this period, the morning sickness fades, baby’s kicks are felt, an adorable baby bump emerges and the aches and pains are mostly delayed until the third trimester.  The second trimester is for fun period for most pregnant women. Here are some of the essential things that you may do during this phase: Find a prenatal exercise class: If you haven't already, now is a good time to start a regular, pregnancy-friendly workout. Joining a class can help motivate you to stick with it. Some good options include water exercise, prenatal yoga or Pilates, a walking group, or a prenatal dance class. Learn about second-trimester prenatal visits and tests: During the second trimester, you'll typically see your caregiver once every four weeks unless you have a condition or complications that call for more frequent checkups. You'll have blood tests, such as the glucose screening test to check for gestational diabetes, and you'll be offered screening testsor amniocentesis to test for Down syndrome as well as other chromosomal abnormalities, genetic disorders, and neural tube defects. Chances are that you may see your baby in an ultrasound! Start shopping for maternity clothes: Most moms-to-be start looking pregnant between 12 and 18 weeks. Even if you're not visibly preggers yet, you may find you're more comfortable in maternity clothes. Keep in mind that you'll probably need different types of maternity clothes for different stages of your pregnancy, so it may make sense to buy just a few key pieces at a time and more as you need them. Decide whether to hire a professional labour coach: A trained labour coach assists you during labour and delivery. She provides you with continuous emotional support, as well as assistance with other non-medical aspects of your care. If you're interested in hiring a doula, it's a good idea to start your search in the second trimester. Plan some adult time: Even though your excitement over having a baby is rising, take a moment to enjoy this baby-free time. It's not that you won't be able to do these things after you have a baby in your life, it's just a little less complicated now, so take advantage. Start moisturising your belly: Slathering on the lotion may not prevent stretch marks, but it will reduce itchiness! Narrow your baby names list: By now you probably have a list of baby names you like. Try this exercise to narrow your list and get on the same page with your partner.    Content source Featured image source

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12 Benefits Of Drinking Coconut Water During Pregnancy

Coconut water is a natural source of electrolytes, prevents dehydration, lowers the acidity of the body, and is simply loaded with nutrition as well. It’s no wonder that many doctors encourage their patients and pregnant women to drink coconut water. There is some evidence that coconut water may help build up immunity, improve kidney function, prevent urinary tract infections (UTI) and lower high blood pressure, but more research is needed before we can say for certain.  Here are some more benefits of the humble Coconut that will interest you: 1. Healthy Breast Milk Drinking coconut water (and eating fresh coconut meat) will help you to produce plenty of healthy breast milk for your baby. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that a single meal containing coconut oil will affect the fatty acid makeup of a woman’s breast milk for as long as 3 days, with the maximum concentration occurring within the first 10 hours. 2. Improves Immunity Coconut water is naturally sterile since it is kept safe from contaminants inside the shell. Coconut water contains anti-viral, antibacterial, and antifungal compounds that can help to prevent you from becoming ill or catching the flu while you are pregnant. 3. Natural Relaxant One of the great things about coconut water is that it naturally relaxes the muscles and nervous system because it contains magnesium. Coconut water can help to relieve joint pains and the itching sensations that often come with pregnancy. 4. Zippo Cholesterol Coconut water contains absolutely no cholesterol, which makes it a heart-healthy drink. Yes, plain water also has no cholesterol, but it also has no magnesium or other nutritious compounds. Consumed regularly, coconut water can even increase the good (HDL) type of cholesterol in the body. 5. Improves Energy Levels Carrying around the extra weight of pregnancy can leave you feeling tired a great deal of the time. Coconut water can help to restore energy levels by increasing the metabolism and stimulating thyroid function. 6. Improves Amniotic Fluid If you would like to improve the overall environment and health of your baby, coconut water can help to improve, and boost the levels of, amniotic fluid. 7. Stops Heartburn Many pregnant women complain about indigestion and heartburn. Drinking coconut water lowers the acid level of the stomach, preventing heartburn, indigestion, and sour stomach before they start. Enjoy half a cup of coconut water before meals. 8. Prevents Constipation You can’t beat coconut water while looking for what to take for constipation. This delicious drink is a natural but mild laxative that can help to prevent the constipation that tends to plague pregnant women. 9. Great Nutrition Coconut water improves blood circulation and is a great source of fiber and vitamin C. Vitamin C improves the immune system and fiber is important for the prevention of constipation. Coconut water has potassium, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Both potassium and electrolytes are important for pregnant women. Coconut water and other coconut products are a great source of lauric acid, which can help to protect your body from disease and viruses. 10. Natural Diuretic For treating and preventing urinary tract infections, coconut water can come to your rescue. Since it is a mild diuretic, coconut water can help to prevent these painful types of infections. Coconut water also has antibacterial compounds that can stop urinary tract infections when they are caught early. Drinking coconut water on a regular basis can also help to prevent kidney stones. 11. Low Calorie Drink Packed with healthy electrolytes that the body needs, coconut water is a great low-calorie drink as well! Since this refreshing drink has healthy amino acids and other enzymes, coconut water can help to fight the dehydration and exhaustion that are common problems for pregnant women. 12. Can Lower Blood Pressure Consuming coconut water on a regular basis can help to lower blood pressure levels due to its high level of potassium. Potassium binds with salt and helps to remove it from the body. Lower sodium levels in the blood mean lower blood pressure. Always remember that moderation is the key. Clean, filtered water should always be your main drink. Don't substitute it with coconut water or other drinks at all times. Always pick fresh, clean, green coconuts and make sure they are cut in front of you. Drink the coconut water as soon as the coconut is cut so that it is fresh and nutrient rich. Use a clean straw or pour the coconut water into a clean glass. Skip drinking coconut water if you feel you don't like the taste or if it doesn't agree with you.   Content Source  

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14 Lifesavers For Your First Trimester

The first trimester can be a brutal introduction. These tips will help you keep your sanity – Coconuts have a zillion beneficial properties, and some of those are really handy when you're pregnant. Coconut water has tons of potassium, prevents dehydration, and is loaded with electrolytes. All things you'll need while pregnant. And coconut oil can help with stretch marks and boost your baby's immune system. Ginger - They are insanely strong, and sometimes even just the smell when I opened the tin was enough to curb the nausea. Buy a case and keep them in your car, your purse, your nightstand, your work desk, on the coffee table Pregnancy dressing is a whole other art form, especially in the first trimester. Your body will start changing, but you'll be too small for "bump" clothes. You might not want the pressure of tight clothes against your body, though, and you may just not be ready for the world to know what's up. You may not grow a belly until the second trimester. But at some point you are going to want to unbutton those pants. Bellaband lets you keep your current jeans while also keeping you comfortable. Water - You will get sick and tired of hearing people tell you to drink plenty of water while pregnant. Dehydration is no joke, especially during the first trimester. But it can also be really hard to get excited about H2O for nine months straight, especially when morning sickness can leave your mouth tasting gross. Skin care - Most doctors will tell you to avoid putting salicylic acid and retinoids on your skin while pregnant: It can be absorbed right into the bloodstream, which is so annoying because one of the first visible signs of all those hormonal changes will be breaking out like a 15-year-old. Ask what ingredients are safe, and start reading labels. Pillow - It's not cheap, but the Comfort-U Maternity Pillow will help save your sanity during those inevitable sleepless nights. It takes up more than half the bed, though, so be warned that your spouse/significant other will not be happy about its arrival. But you are two people now, and the majority wins. Sleep tight! Your feet will get bigger while pregnant, there is no point in denial. And it might be permanent. While the need for comfy flats might not be urgent for a few more months, you may feel your feet changing already. Be prepared to invest in some flats that will support your new body and give you some flex room while your feet expand. Your boobs could definitely start to feel sore and achy in the first trimester. You might even need something comfortable to sleep in. Whip out that coconut oil for sore nipples, but also think about shopping for some comfy maternity bras Fact: You will have the weirdest dreams of your life while pregnant. There's definitely some science behind it. Curb your nighttime anxiety and vivid subconscious by writing it all down. You might just make yourself a hilarious memento of these nine months to enjoy for years to come. Massages are a great lifesaver for many pregnant women, however do consult with your doctor before getting it done! If you're going to be queasy for 12 weeks, you might as well be cute about it. The Barf Boutique makes these sealable, waterproof bags in five colors. Keep them everywhere. It's important to exercise during pregnancy, but even more important to do it safely. Lots of expectant moms talk about walking for exercise, but Tai Chi has a surprising number of pregnancy benefits. There will be a lot racing through your mind during these early stages, and it can be overwhelming. So many decisions, so many options for baby gear you didn't even know existed. Baby Bargains will help you identify all the gear and track it down without bankrupting you. Thus, it is necessary to think of the above and to follow the suggestion provided in this wholesome article! Feature Image Source    

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First Trimester Prenatal Fitness Tips

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Things to consider in your 17th week of pregnancy

By the time you’re 17 weeks pregnant, there will be many changes in your body and this is how your baby's growth will be progresssing: Your body in the 17th Week Your waist will start to disappear as your womb moves up out of your pelvis and your bump becomes more noticeable. If you've been pregnant before, your bump may start showing a bit sooner than for first-time mums.  You may start to feel happier and more confident as your bump becomes more noticeable and you start to feel baby move. Some women and men find that their pregnancy suddenly feels more real when they first see the baby at a scan. You may also have more energy to enjoy getting out and about more. However, pregnancy can make worries about money or relationships feel bigger. As many as 1 in 10 expectant mums feel stressed and anxious. Pregnancy hormones can often be to blame, not to mention coping with health issues, worrying about giving birth and the responsibilities of parenthood. You may feel stressed and anxious, or suffering from depression, don’t hesitate to ask for help.  You’ll have your second scan, known as the ‘fetal anomaly scan' between 18 and 21 weeks. The reason for this scan is to check the growth and development of your baby. The sonographer might also be able to tell the sex of your baby at this scan, though some hospitals have a policy of not revealing this. If you'd prefer not to know whether you're having a boy or a girl, let them know so they don't accidentally tell you the gender. Your Baby's Growth in the 17th Week Your baby is growing quickly and now weighs around 150g. The body grows bigger so that the head and body are more in proportion. The face begins to look much more human, and eyebrows and eyelashes are beginning to grow. Your baby’s eyes can move now, although the eyelids are still shut, and the mouth can open and close.  The lines on the skin of the fingers are now formed, so the baby already has his or her own individual fingerprints. Fingernails and toenails are growing and the baby has a firm hand grip. The baby moves around quite a bit, and may respond to loud noises from the outside world, such as music. You may not feel these movements yet, especially if this is your first pregnancy. If you do, they’ll probably feel like a soft fluttering or rolling sensation. Your baby is putting on a bit of weight but still doesn’t have much fat. If you could see your baby now, it would look a bit wrinkled, although it will continue to put on weight for the rest of the pregnancy and will ‘fill out’ by the last few weeks before birth. By 20 weeks your baby’s skin is covered in a white, greasy substance called vernix. It’s thought that this helps to protect the skin during the many weeks in the amniotic fluid. Feature Image Source      

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