Baby Care

The process of meeting all the needs that a baby may require during the growing up years

Ask anything about baby care

When can you safely give your baby water to drink?

The first food of babies is liquid whether that’s breast milk or formula, and most babies don’t start solids until they are six months old. But you might be wondering: When can babies drink water? When Can Babies Drink Water? For babies 0-6 months: No supplemental water For babies 6-12 months: 59mL to 118mL of water maximum. Most breastfed babies don’t need supplemental water. Once you introduce solids you can introduce water. Formula-fed babies may need a little bit more water, but no more than 118mL. For babies and toddlers 1-3 years old: Many experts recommend 887mL to 1182mL of water. However, if you are still breastfeeding, this quantity is higher. You may talk to your pediatrician about the right quantity of water. Is It okay to give water to a newborn? Healthy babies do not need extra water. Breast milk, formula, or both provide all the fluids they need. Breast milk is made up of 88 percent water, and is sufficient to keep your baby well-hydrated. During the first few days of life, supplementation of any kind interferes with the normal frequency of breastfeeding. If the supplement is water or glucose water, the infant is at increased risk for increased excess weight loss, longer hospital stay, and potential water intoxication.   The dangers of giving a newborn water So babies don’t need to drink water, but what’s the harm in it after those first few days? You may be surprised to learn that giving an infant too much water is actually detrimental. Here are the rare, but dangerous results of too much water: Dehydration: Because a young infant’s kidneys aren’t developed enough to process supplemental water. It can cause them to release excess sodium and water into the urine, which can affect brain activity and lead to dehydration. Malnutrition: Babies who are given water in place of breastmilk or formula fill their bellies up with non-nutritious fluid instead of the healthy calories they need. Too much water can cause your baby to not receive enough nourishment from nursing, and can contribute to low weight gain or failure to thrive. In breastfeeding babies, supplementing with water can also decrease a mother’s milk supply. Water intoxication: Too much water can be toxic to both breastfed and formula-fed newborns. This occurs when there’s an imbalance of sodium and electrolytes in the infant’s body. It can cause irritability, brain swelling, unresponsiveness, and even seizures.   Content source Featured image source

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What to get when you are Expecting

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Essential items to pack in your hospital bag

Your delivery is just round the corner and you are so stressed that you keep forgetting what to keep for the D-Day. So here's a quick check list for you to organize yourself and enjoy your less chaotic days. Smartphone and Charger It's true that today you just can't be without your phone. Since you may be messaging, calling or replying a lot, before and after the delivery, keep your chargers handy, too.  Important Documents A picture ID, health insurance information, and hospital registration forms. Even if you've already registered at the hospital, some hospitals need to confirm your records before they can admit you. Toiletries Deodorant, body wash, shampoo, facial cleansing wipes, toothpaste, and a toothbrush are necessities. Don’t forget the lip balm and moisturizer – hospitals rooms may make your skin dry, so keep all your personal stuff ready. Hair Care Products Head bands, shampoo, conditoner, dry shampoo, oil, and hair brush. Cash and Change Hospital food for your partner and tips to the staff at the end of your stay will make you run out of change. So stuff your wallets.Homecoming Outfit for Baby Pack a newborn-size kimono-style shirt, with footed pants so you don't have to bring socks. You'll likely get a receiving blanket and hat in the hospital, so skip those unless you've got your heart set on a specific style. Extra Outfit for You Here's a hint: You'll probably still look about 5 months pregnant, so skip your non-maternity skinnies and pack your favorite maternity dress or leggings and a tunic. (Trust us: Not fitting into your going-home outfit is a bummer!) Sleepwear and Underwear A cotton nightie will be much more comfortable than a hospital gown, and a robe will come in handy for walking the hallways. Several pairs of undies are also a must for any hospital bag checklist (briefs, maternity, or disposables like Depends) if you don't want to wear the mesh underwear the hospital gives you after delivery.Flip-Flops Bring flip-flops for the shower or to wear home if your feet are swollen. Slippers and/or Heavy Socks Keep your toes toasty and clean, whether you're in bed or strolling around on the cold tile floor. Bring a pair that's easily laundered, as they may get a bit dirty. Extra Undies and Extra-Absorbent Pads You're going to need these after delivery. It might also be helpful to pack lidocaine spray or witch hazel pads (to relieve pain from tearing). Nursing Bra Bring a nursing tank or bra that's comfortable enough to sleep in.  Music, Movies, and Magazines, Books. Load up your smartphone or tablet with tunes and anything you might want to binge-watch on Netflix. It'll help district you—and your partner—during a long labor. An Extra Bag or Two With all the goodies from the hospital—diapers, blankets, and creams—and all the gifts from well wishers, you're bound to have more stuff coming out than you did going in. For the Baby: Most of the things will be provided by the hospital and you will be charged for those anyway, but you could keep these. A set of clothes to take baby back home in A few sets of clothes/onesies/tops for baby to change into while in the hospital Caps  A blanket for the crib A blanket to carry baby back home in Diapers  Wipes

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7 Simple Tips To Make Your Baby Comfortable In Summers

A newborn’s skin is extremely delicate and so is the baby's immune system. Chemicals, fragrances, and dyes in clothing, detergents, and baby products can cause irritation to the baby’s skin along with other complications such as rashes, dryness and chaffing. In the summer season, the hot winds can cause even further dryness to the baby’s skin. The first year of life is very crucial for the baby, so, it is of utmost importance to protect your child’s skin in the hot summer months. Here are 7 simple tips to make your baby comfortable in summers: Increase your baby’s fluid intake - One can easily get dehydrated in the summer season, so make it a point to give enough water to your little one. If your child is younger than 6 months of age and is still breastfeeding, then you need to increase your own intake of fluids so that you can produce enough milk. Give the baby lots of seasonal fruits and juices Include lots of seasonal fruits and their juices in your little one’s diet since they not only provide the much-needed nutrients to your child’s body but also supply water to him/her. Make your baby wear light cotton clothes - Always dress up your child in light-colored cotton clothes so that his/her skin is able to breathe and he/she doesn’t get any rashes from tight clothes. Summer Skin Care - Baby skin is very delicate and needs to be handled with utmost care. Here’s how you can take care of your baby’s delicate skin in the summers- Wash - Resist the urge to bathe the baby too frequently since this can remove the natural oils of the baby’s skin and making it dry and vulnerable. Use only a  pea-sized amount of a natural body wash to bathe your baby. You can use coconut-oil based cleansers to clean the baby’s delicate skin since they soothe the baby’s skin without causing any harmful effects. One such cleanser is The Moms Co. Natural Baby Wash and it has the added benefits of avocado oil, chamomile oil, and aloe vera gel, which soften your baby’s delicate skin. Shampoo - Do not shampoo the baby’s hair every day. When it comes to newborn skincare, “Less is more”. You need to use only a pea-sized amount of shampoo to rinse the baby’s scalp and you need not shampoo the baby’s head every day. A shampoo with organic ingredients is more suitable since you definitely don’t want to take any chances with your newborn’s skin. The Moms Co. Natural Baby Shampoo is a coconut oil-based cleanser that cleanses the baby’s scalp gently and also conditions the baby’s hair with its organic argan and moringa oil.  Moisturize - The best time to moisturize the baby’s body is right after a bath because this is the time when the skin is able to absorb the moisture easily. Using a mild lotion on the skin after a bath. So, make it a point to apply a mild body lotion on the baby’s skin after giving him/her a bath. One of the best options is to apply The Moms Co. Natural Baby Lotion, which has the right ingredients such as organic shea butter, cocoa butter and organic jojoba oil to hydrate and nourish your baby’s delicate skin. This natural baby lotion is mineral-free and this makes even more reliable for your little one. Prevent Sweat - Baby skin is prone to rashes due to sweat so, keep your baby’s skin sweat-free with a talc-free powder during the hot summer months. Nowadays most powders contain talc and fragrances which can be harmful to the baby but The Moms Co. Natural Talc-Free Baby Powder is prepared with cornstarch and helps to absorb the extra moisture within the folds of your child’s skin. It’s organic chamomile and calendula oils help to soothe your baby’s delicate skin. 5. Wash baby clothes before being worn - Before touching your baby’s skin, the new clothes that you bought, might have been in a clothes rack for a long time, might have accumulated dirt and would have been touched by many others. Always wash your baby’s clothes with a mild detergent and an antiseptic before making him/her wear them. This helps to get rid of all the dirt and germs. 6. Avoid taking the baby out during peak hours - As much as possible, avoid taking the baby out during the time when the sun is the hottest, i.e. between 10 am - 4 pm. Schedule outings either before or after this time. Whenever you step out, make the baby wear a hat and carry an umbrella to provide shade to your little one. 7. Do not go in and out of the AC too often - A sudden temperature change can lead to a runny nose and also affect the baby’s skin adversely. Whenever you need to take the baby out of an airconditioned room, turn off the AC, wait for 5-10 minutes and then go. When you’re coming from outside with your little one, do not turn on the AC immediately. Allow the baby’s body to cool a bit under the fan and then turn on the AC. For more such informative articles and videos, download the Mylo App now! Register on the app if you haven't already and get tips worth Rs. 10,000/- for free! Disclaimer: This blog is supported by The Moms Co.

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mera baby 2 mnths ka ha i....meri bfeed bhi ati ..to kya formula milk sahi haai...kya isse mind propr develop hoga...aur kya feeder bottlw se milk de skte haiⁿ

Best breastfeeding positions

Once you and baby are set up, try one of these five best breastfeeding positions: 1. Cradle hold Position your baby so his or her headrests in the bend of your elbow of the arm on the side you'll be breastfeeding, with the hand on that side supporting the rest of the body. Cup your breast with your other hand, placing your thumb above your nipple and areola at the spot where your baby’s nose will touch your breast. Your index finger should be at the spot where your baby’s chin will make contact with the breast. Lightly compress your breast so that the nipple points slightly toward your baby's nose. Baby’s now ready to latch. 2. Crossover hold Hold your baby's head with the hand opposite to the breast you’ll be nursing from (i.e. if nursing from the right breast, hold the head with your left hand). Rest your wrist between your baby’s shoulder blades, your thumb behind one ear, your other fingers behind the other ear. Using your free hand, cup your breast as you would for the cradle hold. 3. Football hold Also known as the clutch hold, this position is especially useful if you have: Had a C-section and want to avoid placing your baby against your abdomen Large breasts A small or premature baby Twins Position your baby at your side, facing you, with baby's legs are tucked under your arm (yes, like a football) on the same side as the breast you're nursing from. Support your baby’s head with the same hand, and use your other hand to cup your breast as you would for the cradle hold.                                                                                                 4. Laid-back position (“biological nursing”) This one can be particularly helpful for moms who have smaller breasts, for newborns, and for babies with super-sensitive tummies or excess gas. Lean back on a bed or couch, well supported by pillows in a semi-reclining position, so that when you put your baby tummy-to-tummy onto your body, head near your breast, gravity will keep him or her molded to you. Your baby can rest on you in any direction, as long as the whole front of the body is against yours and he or she can reach your breast. Your infant can naturally latch on in this position, or you can help by directing the nipple toward your little one's mouth. Once the baby is set up at your breast, you don’t have to do much besides lie back and relax. 5. Side-lying position This position is a good choice when you’re breastfeeding in the middle of the night. Both you and your baby should lie on your sides, tummy to tummy. Use your hand on the side you’re not lying on to cup your breast if you need to. When using this position, there should be no excess bedding around the infant that could pose a suffocation hazard. This position shouldn’t be used on a recliner, couch or water bed for that same reason.                                                                                                   Content Source  Featured Image Source 

Avoid giving these foods to your baby

Growing babies soon start to show interest in trying new foods, and it's normal to want to introduce them to new tastes and textures but not all foods are safe for your baby. Here is a list of foods you should avoid feeding your baby during the first year of growth: Honey: Infants under the age of one should not be fed any form of honey (raw, baked, or cooked). Honey is bad for babies because it can cause Clostridium botulinum, which can produce botulinum spores. These spores release toxins that can lead to muscle weakness, poor sucking, a weak cry, constipation, decreased muscle tone, and even paralysis in young infants. An infant's intestinal track isn't strong enough to fight off these spores and toxins. Cow's Milk: Stick to breast milk or formula until your child's first birthday. A child under the age of one can't digest the enzymes and proteins in cow's milk, and certain minerals in it can cause damage to your baby's kidneys. Also, unlike breast milk or formula, cow's milk doesn't provide all the proper nutrients for a growing infant. Egg Whites: Don't feed egg products to a child under the age of one to avoid an allergic reaction or allergies in the future. While the proteins in egg yolks are seldom a source of allergens, the proteins in eggs whites may cause allergic reactions. By the age of five a child normally outgrows the potential for an allergic reaction to egg whites. Citrus: Avoid feeding citrus fruits and juices to baby for the first couple of months. These foods are high in Vitamin C and acid, which can cause an upset tummy and/or acid reflux in your baby. Seafood/Shellfish: Another potential allergen for babies is seafood, and particularly shellfish. You may talk to your paediatrician before feeding your baby boneless fish. Do not give any sort of shellfish (such as shrimp, clams, or crabmeat) to baby. Large Chunks of Food: It is widely recommended that you feed your child breast milk or formula for the first four to six months. Once you start baby on solids, pea-sized foods are safest, to prevent choking. Make sure that vegetables are diced and cooked up soft, and cut fruits into quarters to avoid their getting stuck in your child's throat. Meats and cheese should also be cut into very small pieces, or shredded. Soft Foods: Foods like jellies, marshmallows, and any other sort of soft food should not be given to a baby. These foods can easily get stuck in a baby's throat.   Content source Featured image source

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FAQ: Introducing your baby to solid foods

Introducing solid food to your child is a big step ahead in their growth chart. A lot of mothers, whether new or old, have a lot of questions revolving around this crucial step forward in their child’s life. We made a list of some of the questions, after studying the primary questions posed by mothers to their pediatricians, their own mothers, fellow-mothers or on group threads, social media, and discussion boards, and answered them. When should I introduce solid foods to my child? Ideally, six months is the right age to introduce a baby to solid foods. Before this, you might notice your child not allowing the spoon to enter their mouth or their inability to swallow solid food. Additionally, initiating solid food too early also reduces the production of breast milk, if you are breastfeeding the child. Introducing food before this age might also increase their chances of developing a food allergy or becoming obese. Though this is an ideal time to start solid food, each child is different and would give you the clues as to when they are ready to start solid food. These signs would include the following: The baby can grab and reach for objects. The baby shows interest in food and tries to reach for the food you eat. The baby can sit straight independently. This is the biggest indicator that they would have lost their tongue-thrusting reflex. The baby has an increased appetite where their milk times have increased or you notice them taking in more milk than their usual at a mealtime. Look out for these clues before you introduce solid food to them. Why does a baby need solid food at six-months? By the time the baby reaches six months of age, they have used up their stores of essential nutrients that they were born with. Now, to grow further they need essential vitamins, nutrients, and minerals, like iron and zinc, which solid food can provide them easily. By this time, their digestive system would be ready for solid food. This would be demonstrated by the fact that the baby’s hunger is not satisfied by breast or formula milk alone. This is also the right time to introduce allergy foods. Further, familiarizing them with solid food is the first step in making them independent for their forthcoming life. How often should I give my child solid food? In order to get your child used to the idea of eating, schedule a breakfast, lunch and dinner time for them. Even if they are not hungry, do sit them down with a tablespoon of whatever you have planned for them. This would get them used to the idea of mealtime and also help them fall into a schedule for the day. You would notice that most six-month olds would be comfortable eating just once a day. And as the majority of their nutrition comes from the breast or formula milk, it is all right if they do so. As your child grows, they would slowly get used to the idea of eating regularly and would develop a routine of eating three meals a day along with the family. My baby appears to be not interested in solid foods. Should I force them to eat? No. Never force your child to eat. This will only make them averse to food. In fact, if you feel that even after trying for a sufficient amount of time, they are not interested in eating anything, get them out of the high chair or any other chair that you use for feeding and move on to the next scheduled activity. Further, at times, the first feed is a little strange for the child, so they might not be able to accept it. As it has a different texture, smell, and taste, they just might end up spitting out the whole thing. But don’t worry. Remove the food from their vicinity and try again the next day. Just like at times we do not want to eat, babies also might not want to eat. Moreover, they are yet to fall in a habit so it’s all right if they skip a meal. What should be the size of the meals that I offer my child? At four to six months, feed the child between two to four tablespoon of the planned meal. Remember, their meal intake might change from meal to meal and from day to day. So don’t get worried if one day your baby is eating four tablespoons of food and the next day, they are eating just three. Also, as the child gets used to eating, their appetite will increase naturally. As this happens, increase the amount of food by a half-a-tablespoon until you feel that they are feeling full.  

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Best Foods for a 6-Month-Old Baby

Expert pediatricians recommend avoiding salt and sugar until the age of one, as it puts unwanted stress on the kidneys. Some healthy food options for 6 months+ babies include: 1. Fruits Puree: Fruits should be steamed, and mashed or pureed while introducing for the first time. Fruits like apples, bananas, pear, avocado, chikoo, and peaches can be given. 2. Vegetable Puree: Vegetables such as sweet potatoes, potatoes, carrots, sweet pumpkin, french beans, etc. can be steamed and given either as finger foods or as a puree. 3. Pulses Soup: A variety of pulses, especially dals, can be boiled with water and the soup can be given to babies. 4. Rice Porridge: Rice is a good source of carbohydrates and vitamins for babies. Broken rice, made with breast milk or formula milk can be given as porridge. 5. Cereal Porridge: Porridge can also be made from a variety of single-grain cereals like wheat, millet, barley, oats, etc. These cereals can be dried and powdered together or separately, to make gruel. 6. Vegetable Soup: A variety of vegetables can be boiled in water, and the stock can be given as soup. 7. Yogurt: Although cow’s milk is not recommended until the age of one, unsweetened yogurt can be given in moderate amounts as an alternative to purees.                                                                                                      6-Month-Old Baby Food Chart/Meal Plan You can prepare a meal plan or chart for your baby’s meals and follow it as much as possible. The chart below can help you design your own 6-month-old baby food schedule according to your baby’s preferences.                                                                                                   Content Source Featured Image Source