Baby Care

The process of meeting all the needs that a baby may require during the growing up years

Ask anything about baby care

When can you safely give your baby water to drink?

The first food of babies is liquid whether that’s breast milk or formula, and most babies don’t start solids until they are six months old. But you might be wondering: When can babies drink water? When Can Babies Drink Water? For babies 0-6 months: No supplemental water For babies 6-12 months: 59mL to 118mL of water maximum. Most breastfed babies don’t need supplemental water. Once you introduce solids you can introduce water. Formula-fed babies may need a little bit more water, but no more than 118mL. For babies and toddlers 1-3 years old: Many experts recommend 887mL to 1182mL of water. However, if you are still breastfeeding, this quantity is higher. You may talk to your pediatrician about the right quantity of water. Is It okay to give water to a newborn? Healthy babies do not need extra water. Breast milk, formula, or both provide all the fluids they need. Breast milk is made up of 88 percent water, and is sufficient to keep your baby well-hydrated. During the first few days of life, supplementation of any kind interferes with the normal frequency of breastfeeding. If the supplement is water or glucose water, the infant is at increased risk for increased excess weight loss, longer hospital stay, and potential water intoxication.   The dangers of giving a newborn water So babies don’t need to drink water, but what’s the harm in it after those first few days? You may be surprised to learn that giving an infant too much water is actually detrimental. Here are the rare, but dangerous results of too much water: Dehydration: Because a young infant’s kidneys aren’t developed enough to process supplemental water. It can cause them to release excess sodium and water into the urine, which can affect brain activity and lead to dehydration. Malnutrition: Babies who are given water in place of breastmilk or formula fill their bellies up with non-nutritious fluid instead of the healthy calories they need. Too much water can cause your baby to not receive enough nourishment from nursing, and can contribute to low weight gain or failure to thrive. In breastfeeding babies, supplementing with water can also decrease a mother’s milk supply. Water intoxication: Too much water can be toxic to both breastfed and formula-fed newborns. This occurs when there’s an imbalance of sodium and electrolytes in the infant’s body. It can cause irritability, brain swelling, unresponsiveness, and even seizures.   Content source Featured image source

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What to get when you are Expecting

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Essential items to pack in your hospital bag

Your delivery is just round the corner and you are so stressed that you keep forgetting what to keep for the D-Day. So here's a quick check list for you to organize yourself and enjoy your less chaotic days. Smartphone and Charger It's true that today you just can't be without your phone. Since you may be messaging, calling or replying a lot, before and after the delivery, keep your chargers handy, too.  Important Documents A picture ID, health insurance information, and hospital registration forms. Even if you've already registered at the hospital, some hospitals need to confirm your records before they can admit you. Toiletries Deodorant, body wash, shampoo, facial cleansing wipes, toothpaste, and a toothbrush are necessities. Don’t forget the lip balm and moisturizer – hospitals rooms may make your skin dry, so keep all your personal stuff ready. Hair Care Products Head bands, shampoo, conditoner, dry shampoo, oil, and hair brush. Cash and Change Hospital food for your partner and tips to the staff at the end of your stay will make you run out of change. So stuff your wallets.Homecoming Outfit for Baby Pack a newborn-size kimono-style shirt, with footed pants so you don't have to bring socks. You'll likely get a receiving blanket and hat in the hospital, so skip those unless you've got your heart set on a specific style. Extra Outfit for You Here's a hint: You'll probably still look about 5 months pregnant, so skip your non-maternity skinnies and pack your favorite maternity dress or leggings and a tunic. (Trust us: Not fitting into your going-home outfit is a bummer!) Sleepwear and Underwear A cotton nightie will be much more comfortable than a hospital gown, and a robe will come in handy for walking the hallways. Several pairs of undies are also a must for any hospital bag checklist (briefs, maternity, or disposables like Depends) if you don't want to wear the mesh underwear the hospital gives you after delivery.Flip-Flops Bring flip-flops for the shower or to wear home if your feet are swollen. Slippers and/or Heavy Socks Keep your toes toasty and clean, whether you're in bed or strolling around on the cold tile floor. Bring a pair that's easily laundered, as they may get a bit dirty. Extra Undies and Extra-Absorbent Pads You're going to need these after delivery. It might also be helpful to pack lidocaine spray or witch hazel pads (to relieve pain from tearing). Nursing Bra Bring a nursing tank or bra that's comfortable enough to sleep in.  Music, Movies, and Magazines, Books. Load up your smartphone or tablet with tunes and anything you might want to binge-watch on Netflix. It'll help district you—and your partner—during a long labor. An Extra Bag or Two With all the goodies from the hospital—diapers, blankets, and creams—and all the gifts from well wishers, you're bound to have more stuff coming out than you did going in. For the Baby: Most of the things will be provided by the hospital and you will be charged for those anyway, but you could keep these. A set of clothes to take baby back home in A few sets of clothes/onesies/tops for baby to change into while in the hospital Caps  A blanket for the crib A blanket to carry baby back home in Diapers  Wipes

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7 Simple Tips To Make Your Baby Comfortable In Summers

A newborn’s skin is extremely delicate and so is the baby's immune system. Chemicals, fragrances, and dyes in clothing, detergents, and baby products can cause irritation to the baby’s skin along with other complications such as rashes, dryness and chaffing. In the summer season, the hot winds can cause even further dryness to the baby’s skin. The first year of life is very crucial for the baby, so, it is of utmost importance to protect your child’s skin in the hot summer months. Here are 7 simple tips to make your baby comfortable in summers: Increase your baby’s fluid intake - One can easily get dehydrated in the summer season, so make it a point to give enough water to your little one. If your child is younger than 6 months of age and is still breastfeeding, then you need to increase your own intake of fluids so that you can produce enough milk. Give the baby lots of seasonal fruits and juices Include lots of seasonal fruits and their juices in your little one’s diet since they not only provide the much-needed nutrients to your child’s body but also supply water to him/her. Make your baby wear light cotton clothes - Always dress up your child in light-colored cotton clothes so that his/her skin is able to breathe and he/she doesn’t get any rashes from tight clothes. Summer Skin Care - Baby skin is very delicate and needs to be handled with utmost care. Here’s how you can take care of your baby’s delicate skin in the summers- Wash - Resist the urge to bathe the baby too frequently since this can remove the natural oils of the baby’s skin and making it dry and vulnerable. Use only a  pea-sized amount of a natural body wash to bathe your baby. You can use coconut-oil based cleansers to clean the baby’s delicate skin since they soothe the baby’s skin without causing any harmful effects. One such cleanser is The Moms Co. Natural Baby Wash and it has the added benefits of avocado oil, chamomile oil, and aloe vera gel, which soften your baby’s delicate skin. Shampoo - Do not shampoo the baby’s hair every day. When it comes to newborn skincare, “Less is more”. You need to use only a pea-sized amount of shampoo to rinse the baby’s scalp and you need not shampoo the baby’s head every day. A shampoo with organic ingredients is more suitable since you definitely don’t want to take any chances with your newborn’s skin. The Moms Co. Natural Baby Shampoo is a coconut oil-based cleanser that cleanses the baby’s scalp gently and also conditions the baby’s hair with its organic argan and moringa oil.  Moisturize - The best time to moisturize the baby’s body is right after a bath because this is the time when the skin is able to absorb the moisture easily. Using a mild lotion on the skin after a bath. So, make it a point to apply a mild body lotion on the baby’s skin after giving him/her a bath. One of the best options is to apply The Moms Co. Natural Baby Lotion, which has the right ingredients such as organic shea butter, cocoa butter and organic jojoba oil to hydrate and nourish your baby’s delicate skin. This natural baby lotion is mineral-free and this makes even more reliable for your little one. Prevent Sweat - Baby skin is prone to rashes due to sweat so, keep your baby’s skin sweat-free with a talc-free powder during the hot summer months. Nowadays most powders contain talc and fragrances which can be harmful to the baby but The Moms Co. Natural Talc-Free Baby Powder is prepared with cornstarch and helps to absorb the extra moisture within the folds of your child’s skin. It’s organic chamomile and calendula oils help to soothe your baby’s delicate skin. 5. Wash baby clothes before being worn - Before touching your baby’s skin, the new clothes that you bought, might have been in a clothes rack for a long time, might have accumulated dirt and would have been touched by many others. Always wash your baby’s clothes with a mild detergent and an antiseptic before making him/her wear them. This helps to get rid of all the dirt and germs. 6. Avoid taking the baby out during peak hours - As much as possible, avoid taking the baby out during the time when the sun is the hottest, i.e. between 10 am - 4 pm. Schedule outings either before or after this time. Whenever you step out, make the baby wear a hat and carry an umbrella to provide shade to your little one. 7. Do not go in and out of the AC too often - A sudden temperature change can lead to a runny nose and also affect the baby’s skin adversely. Whenever you need to take the baby out of an airconditioned room, turn off the AC, wait for 5-10 minutes and then go. When you’re coming from outside with your little one, do not turn on the AC immediately. Allow the baby’s body to cool a bit under the fan and then turn on the AC. For more such informative articles and videos, download the Mylo App now! Register on the app if you haven't already and get tips worth Rs. 10,000/- for free! Disclaimer: This blog is supported by The Moms Co.

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Super Boss: Four Women On Juggling Motherhood And Work

Seema Patel, 36, mother of two Seema Patel, a lawyer and deputy director of San Francisco’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement, was taking her first steps at a government job in Washington DC a few years ago when her then-boss sat her down with an unexpected piece of advice. “I don’t know anything about you,” her boss said. “But if you have any plans to have a family in the future, start saving your leave right now.” Patel’s employer was the federal government, and she didn’t get a day of paid maternity leave as part of her work arrangement. Get Society Weekly: our newsletter for public service professionals  Back then, Patel was unmarried and very career-focused, and a family was the last thing on her mind. But diligently, she took her boss’s word for it. She avoided using her sick days over the course of four years so that when she eventually did have her first child two years ago, she had accumulated enough to get three months paid time off. When she had her second baby six months ago, Patel could not pull the same trick. The four months she took off were entirely unpaid. Patel says she experienced no pushback from colleagues, but it is the work structure she has an issue with. “I find it extremely unsupportive for anyone trying to have family,” she says. “It sends a message: your country does not value you becoming a parent.” Karen Choi, 41, mother of four Karen Choi, a vice-president at asset management firm Capital Group, says that any working woman who is a mother should be applauded. Choi, who has four children including a six-month-old baby, describes juggling being a mother and a job “a constant struggle”. Secrets for keeping your head above water include having an “unbelievably supportive family” as well as a nanny and babysitter, accepting that there are some areas you are not going to be the best at (“Not everyone can be the Martha of home décor”), and simply getting through it. Advertisement Choi says she took more maternity leave with every child she had, starting with two and a half months with her first child, and taking six months off with her latest. This makes her an exception, especially within her industry. “When your child is sick, has a fever, is throwing up and you are up all night taking care of your child and knowing that the next morning you have to get your other kids to school and then you have to go to work ... That’s when it gets to be very challenging”, she says. Her firm was supportive, though, and she stresses her investment portfolio’s performance did not suffer at all. When she entered the finance industry after university, about 20 or so of her female college mates chose the same path, she says. Today about 90% of them have left. Women who exit jobs and then re-enter are likely to no longer be on track for peak earning positions, she says. Staying is tough: “A sacrifice in the short term, but it pays in the long term.” If nothing else, her children have helped provide meaning for this sacrifice, she says, because all four of her children are daughters. “One of the things that keep me going is the fact that I would like to be a role model for them.” Kelly Posner, 48, mother of four The notion of being a role model to her four children is also what drives 48-year-old research scientist and professor Kelly Posner. “They know that their mom is out there literally helping to save lives.” Posner, who is the founder and director of the Center for Suicide Risk Assessment at Columbia University, says it is important for women to know that they can have a “big goal” career-wise and achieve it. “It is very important for women to believe that they can have a vision. Most women do not allow themselves to think that” she says. She once gave a presentation to 200 people, including government officials in Italy over a webinar while eight months pregnant. Technology has also helped, she says, with the ability to stop the car and take a call after picking her kids up, or to answer an email on the go. Juggling motherhood with a demanding career has been helped by an optimistic, problem-solving disposition, she says – an ability to get through things even when they feel impossible. Jennifer Epps-Addison, 33, mother of two Jennifer Epps-Addison, 33, the executive director of Wisconsin Jobs Now and a mother of two, says that only being able to make career and motherhood work together thanks to private networks of help – like nannies – is wrong. “You shouldn’t have to get lucky or win the lottery to be able to succeed,” she says, describing the systemic failure to support women and families – citing oppressively low wages, a flawed health care system and a lack of mandated paid maternity leave. “As a society, we are not taking care of each other,” she says. “We cannot even guarantee mothers who have just birthed a child to recuperate.” Epps-Addison, who was pregnant while attending law school, gave birth to one of her children while she was on a fellowship. With a husband and offspring relying on the healthcare provided by the fellowship, the labor leader was only able to take two weeks' maternity leave, she says, before returning to work. Content Source

Transitioning back to work after the baby: Tips for working moms

Top Seven Tips for Moms Returning to Work (outside the home): 1) If at all possible, return to work on a Thursday (if you work full time) so that you have a short work week initially. Then you have the weekend to review how to make necessary adjustments for the following week. And you enter the new week knowing you can do this! It is empowering to get through the first week, even if it is a short one. 2) If pumping, find out ahead of time where you can have privacy. Is there a lactation room at your work? Or an office with a lock on it? You don’t want someone barging in on you while in a vulnerable position. If you try pumping, and you find you just don’t have the energy to continue, perhaps partial supplementation with a formula for your baby will be just fine. Then you can breast-feed when you are with your baby at night and on weekends.  3) Bring snacks and water. It is so important to stay hydrated and keep blood sugar even. It’s easy to forget to eat or drink water when multi-tasking. Remember that proper nutrition, including continuing with prenatal vitamins (if breastfeeding and doctor recommends), is essential to good mood health. Bring high-protein snacks (like almonds and string cheese) to graze on throughout the day and before/after lunch. What is good for your body is good for your mental state. 4) Allow yourself to cry. You will miss your baby. A lot. Initially, it will be very tough. Bring Kleenex. Give yourself the time and space to let the tears flow in the company of supportive people who understand your transition. Then distract yourself with tasks at hand to ground yourself back in the present. Reward yourself with some nice adult conversation and a cup of delicious coffee or herbal tea. Savor being able to enjoy a chat with your colleagues uninterrupted by baby’s needs. 5) It may be helpful to bring a transitional object that reminds you of your connection with your baby, like a picture of the baby, or a little bootie with his/her scent. Some women laugh that they have a “baby shrine” of baby photos at their desks so that they feel connected to their little one while away. Leave a photo of you with the baby and an item with your scent on it (a robe or article of clothing). You stay connected through your senses that way throughout the day. 6) Align yourself with other working moms. They are invaluable as support when you are having a tough day balancing it all. These mammas are doing what you are doing and more than likely have some emotional support and tricks up the sleeve that has helped them weather the storm of transitioning back to work.  Don’t reinvent the wheel. Go to the seasoned mammas for support and guidance. 7) If at all possible, work for a family-friendly company. All moms/families deserve to have the flexibility they need to make work/family life balance possible. Sadly, not all employers embrace this philosophy. Some employers also have generous family leave policies. Check Working Mother magazine for the top employers who are “family-friendly.” I especially love companies that have on-site daycare. Content Source    

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Work after baby: Making the successful transition

The decision to go back to work after spending some quality time with the newborn can be emotionally draining for a new mom. Most of the moms find it tough to resume their work and stay away from their babies for several hours. Becoming a working mother can cause several conflicting feelings in the mind: Guilt that you are leaving your baby in charge of a caretaker. Relief that you are making your baby learn to live away from you. Guilt that you are feeling relieved to be away from your newborn. Missing the baby at the workplace. These contradictory emotions are totally normal and expected from a new mother. Given below are some of the tips that will help you ease those back-work-jitters and make the transition successful. Have a backup childcare plan: If your baby gets sick (and she will) or your childcare facility is closed for a day or your babysitter is stuck in traffic, be prepared with alternative arrangements so you're not scrambling at the last minute. Manage your time well: You've got a pretty compelling reason to get your work done as your baby is waiting for you at home. Time management at work is very important for a successful career. Ask for support: This is a tough time, so lean on your spouse, friends, family, other working moms, and anyone else who's willing to help you make this transition. Don't forget about you: If you're completely exhausted and emotionally depleted, you won't do either of your "jobs" effectively. Try to get as much rest as possible, do some exercise for a healthy mind and body. Bring a little bit of baby to work: Arrange a couple of cute photos on your desk or in your workspace or locker. You can also create a virtual gallery. You may use your photos to create a slide show starring your little one on your computer screen. It's easy to do and easy to update as your baby grows. Call home for your "coo" fix: There's nothing like hearing the sound of your baby's gurgles to feel connected (hearing him crying is another matter altogether). It's fine to ring up your caregiver once or twice a day. Just don't get crazy and check in every hour. Try to time your calls so your baby is alert and happy. Content source Featured image source

Slow weight gain in breastfed babies

Most breastfed babies will get enough breast milk and gain weight in a consistent and expected pattern as long as they latch on well and breastfeed often. But, what if you think your child isn't getting what he needs to grow and thrive? If you're breastfeeding and your newborn is gaining weight slowly or inconsistently then he may not be getting enough breast milk. So, here's what to look for and what to do if you think your child isn't gaining weight well. Breastfeeding and Slow Weight Gain Breastfed newborns can lose up to 10 percent of their birth weight during the first week. Then, by the time a child is two weeks old, he should regain the weight that was lost. After that, for the next three months or so, breastfed babies gain about 28 gram per day. Of course, every newborn is different, and some children just normally grow more slowly than others. So, as long as your baby is breastfeeding well and his health care exams are on target, a slower weight gain may not be an issue. When Slow Weight Gain Is a Problem Weight gain is the best sign that a child is getting enough breast milk. When a baby is gaining weight slower than expected, it could mean that she's not getting enough. So, if your newborn is not back to her birth weight in two weeks, or she's not gaining weight consistently after that, it may be that there's a breastfeeding issue that's preventing your child from getting enough breast milk. The Reasons Your Baby May Not Be Gaining Weight as Expected Your newborn is not latching on well: A good latch allows your child to remove the breast milk from your breast without getting tired out and frustrated. If your baby is not latching on correctly, or latching on to just your nipple, she won't be able to remove the breast milk very well. Your baby isn't breastfeeding often enough: Breastfeed your newborn at least every two to three hours through the day and night for the first six to eight weeks. If he wants to breastfeed more often, put him back to the breast. Your child is not breastfeeding long enough at each feeding: Newborns should breastfeed for about 8 to 10 minutes on each side. As your child gets older, she won't need to breastfeed as long to get the breast milk she needs, but during the first few weeks, try to keep her awake and actively sucking for as long as you can. Your little one is in pain: If your baby is not comfortable because of a birth injury or an infection such as thrush in her mouth, she may not breastfeed well, and therefore she may be gaining weight slowly. You have a low breast milk supply: A low milk supply can prevent your child from getting enough breast milk, but it could also be the result of your baby not breastfeeding well. It's a bit of a vicious cycle. The good news is that a typical low milk supply can often be recovered pretty easily.   Content source Featured image source

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Spend some quality time with your baby after work

There's no denying, that the birth of a baby is one of the most cherished moments in a family and in some ways an opportunity for relatives, especially grandparents, to relive the joy of being a parent once again. Your baby is bound to be the center of everyone's attention. However, your worries are understandable too and you would need to find a way to ensure you and your baby get to spend as much time as possible with each other. You may feel your extended family's constant presence annoying at times, but if they are caring for your baby while you are at work you may hesitate a bit about how to let your feelings be known. Be open and give them the benefit of doubt. Often what you perceive, may not be how another person views the situation. It's possible they may be keeping your baby away from you for a while because they want to relax when you get back from work. Or, they may suggest your baby sleeps in their room so that you and your husband get the rest you need or some time together. One thing you can be sure of is that they love your baby as much as you do too! If you still believe that your family members are trying to keep your baby away from you, speak to them individually. Tell them how you feel and how they can help you by allowing you to spend more time with your baby. You may want to try out the following options: 1. Thank your family members for their support but also let them know gently that you would like to spend some more time with your baby alone. 2. Work out an arrangement whereby you can keep the baby with you in the evenings and your in-laws can take care of him in the mornings. 3. Take turns massaging, bathing your baby and putting him to sleep. 4. Make it a point to take your baby out to the park or for walks with you alone so you get time together. Try these simple ways to connect with your baby! 5. Speak to your husband as well for suggestions and solutions. Maybe you could both work out a plan to spend more time with your baby alone. 6. Most importantly, consider flexible working options until both you and your baby are comfortable with you working full time. Be tactful and sensitive to their feelings when you talk to them. Do not forget to tell them how important your baby and your work are to you, as well as the relationship you share with your family members. It may not be easy at first, but with some patience and understanding, you'll soon find a routine that works for both of you. Content Source

Introducing solid foods to your baby: Quick tips

As your baby gets older, she starts to need solid food so she can get enough iron and other essential nutrients for growth and development. For about the first six months of life, your baby uses iron stored in his body from when he was in the womb. He also gets some iron from breastmilk and/or infant formula. But your baby’s iron stores go down as he grows. And by around six months, he can’t get the iron he needs from breast milk or infant formula alone. Introducing solids is also important for helping your baby learn to eat, giving her experience of new tastes and textures from a range of foods, developing her teeth and jaws, and building other skills that she’ll need later for language development. Signs that it’s time for introducing solids: Your baby’s individual development and behaviour will guide you when you’re trying to work out when to start introducing solids. Signs your baby is ready for solids include when your baby: Has good head and neck control and can sit upright when supported Shows an interest in food – for example, by looking at what’s on your plate Reaches out for your food Opens his mouth when you offer him food on a spoon. Most babies start to show these signs around six months, but the signs happen at different times for different babies. It’s not recommended to introduce solids before four months. If your baby is nearing seven months of age and hasn’t started solids, you might like to get some advice from your child and family health nurse or GP. How to introduce solids: Food timing When you’re first introducing solids, it’s a good idea to offer solids when you and your baby are both happy and relaxed. Your baby is also more likely to try solids after a feed of breastmilk or formula. This is because when babies are really hungry, they just want the breastmilk or formula that they know satisfies their hunger. They’ll still have room to try new foods after they’ve had a feed of breastmilk or formula. As time passes, you’ll learn when your baby is hungry or full, not interested or tired. Signs of hunger include your baby: Getting excited when she sees you getting her food ready Leaning towards you while she’s sitting in the highchair Opening her mouth as you’re about to feed her Signs your baby is no longer interested include: Turning his head away Losing interest or getting distracted Pushing the spoon away Clamping his mouth shut Content source Featured image source  

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Dry Skin in Babies: All that you need to know

It isn’t uncommon for baby skin to be flaky and peeling off. Most new parents expect their newborns to have soft and supple skin but this is just a myth. A newborn’s skin is a lot thinner than an adult’s skin. It is very sensitive and it doesn’t produce as many natural oils as an adult body does. This is one of the reasons why it is prone to get chapped easily.    Why does newborn skin peel? When your baby comes out of the womb, his/her body is covered with various liquids, including amniotic fluid, vernix, and blood. Your baby spends 9 months in the womb surrounded by amniotic fluid. The vernix acts as a protective barrier between the skin and the amniotic fluid. Once the vernix is wiped off, the baby’s skin starts peeling off within 1-3 weeks. Some babies shed more skin while some shed less, but this is nothing to worry about.  However, some babies may have extremely dry skin since this is how the texture of their skin is. Such babies experience chapping, dryness, itchiness and rash-like patches on their skin due to serious skin problems such as Eczema and Ichthyosis. If your baby’s skin is cracking often, you need to be really careful and adopt ways to prevent dryness of the baby’s skin.    How to treat dry skin in babies?  Although some amount of peeling is normal, it isn’t a bad idea to provide gentle care to your baby’s delicate skin from the very beginning. Here are some simple tips to treat dry skin in babies:  1. Reduce exposure to cold air - Cold air is dry and tends to dry out your baby’s skin as well. Limit your baby’s exposure to cold air as much as possible.  2. Use a Humidifier - Placing a humidifier in the room is a great way to keep the air in the room moist.  3. Keep the baby hydrated - Dehydration can also lead to dryness and skin peeling, so make sure that you breastfeed your baby at regular intervals. If your baby is older than 6 months of age, you may give some water to your baby at the recommendation of a pediatrician.  4. Use organic and soothing products on your baby’s skin - When your baby’s skin is so sensitive, you shouldn’t just use any random products on your baby’s skin. A coconut oil-based gentle cleanser or an oatmeal bath can prove to be very soothing for the baby’s delicate skin. The clinically proven non-drying Natural Soothing Relief Wash by The Moms Co. contains both the above ingredients, along with organic calendula oil and aloe vera gel. It gently cleanses the baby’s skin, without causing any irritation.  You need to provide around the clock moisturization to your baby’s dry skin. Natural Soothing Relief Lotion by The Moms Co. has a clinically proven 24- hour moisturization formula and it also contains, colloidal oatmeal, calendula oil, and aloe vera gel, which help to relieve itching and eczema. Applying the soothing relief lotion after a bath is the best way to lock the moisture. The Soothing Relief Range by The Moms Co. is clinically proven to treat redness, rashes, and itchiness on the baby’s skin.  5. Limit bath time and do not rub the baby’s skin- Prolonged bathtime using hot water can affect the baby’s skin adversely. Limit the bathtime to not more than 7-10 minutes and always bathe the baby with lukewarm water. Hot water washes away the natural oils of the skin. Never rub your baby’s skin too harshly after a bath, since this can further aggravate the peeling of the skin. Just pat dry your baby’s skin with a soft towel after bathing him/her.  6. Dress your baby appropriately - Always choose soft cotton clothes for your baby, which aren’t too tight. This helps to prevent skin irritation and rashes. Also, make it a point to wash your baby’s clothes with a mild detergent.    Disclaimer: This blog is supported by The Moms Co.

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Your heart stops beating when your baby feels breathless! Here are 5 things to know about infant breathlessness.

Infant breathlessness is a serious matter. Sometimes, it is a problem in and of itself and requires attention. Attention, in this case, can range from at-home first aid to hospitalization. Other times, it is only a symptom to a much more dangerous life-threatening condition. Usually, breathlessness points to diseases in the lungs, but sometimes it can be due to problems in the heart or infections that interfere with the normal functioning of the lungs. Infections take a toll on the body as a whole and cause severe exhaustion, which may also contribute to this problem. Treatment must be immediate and sustained. Breathing problems cannot be taken lightly. Newborns who suffer from breathing issues need to be placed in a NICU immediately after birth and watched for days before they can be released. Parents have to keep on watching for any irregular symptoms at home, even after dismissal from the hospital. IT CAN HAPPEN TO ANYONE In a normal baby, the first breath is taken immediately after birth. When the baby is in the uterus, fluid fills the lungs. At birth, the fluid in the lungs is removed through the blood and lymph system and is replaced by air. At this point, breathing begins normally. Physical handling during labor also stimulates a baby’s crying and helps with the first breath. In some cases, fluid in the nose does not move and blocks the airway, causing the first breath to be delayed. In this case, a medical professional -usually a doctor or a qualified nurse- use an aspirator to draw fluid from the nose and clear the airway. The process is usually smooth and the baby starts breathing well after. If not, then an underlying cause is present and the baby is taken to a more critical care unit for oxygen masks until further tests are done. BREATHING PROBLEMS CAN SIGNIFY HEART DISEASE One of the most common causes of breathlessness in infants is a congenital heart defect. This defect happens when the heart is not fully developed in the fetus. It causes problems with blood flow, affecting the oxygen supply that the baby receives.  Although this is common in preterm infants, about one-third of full-term babies born with a congenital heart defect have major defects that need surgery. This is why parents need to watch out for breathing problems even in full-term babies. The heart and the lungs are closely related in function and depend on each other. When the heart is not operating properly, it places extreme stress on the lungs to compensate for lack of oxygen in the blood. Conversely, when the lungs are distressed, the heart is unable to function normally. Whatever the initial cause is, breathlessness is a dangerous result. IT MAKES BABIES SWEAT A common symptom of breathlessness is sweating. This is particularly worrying because it is unusual in infants and it happens in irregular places such as around the lips or on the nose. It is usually accompanied by crying and restlessness. The reason for this symptom is related to effort. Think about how strenuous exercise causes increased heart rate and excess sweating in adults. It is the same for infants. When an infant is struggling to breathe, this places extra stress on the body, particularly the lungs and the surrounding muscles. Muscles start using more energy than normal in an attempt to breathe, resulting in sweating as if the baby is exercising. It is also evident when the baby is having an episode of shortness of breath and gasping. SUNKEN ABDOMEN The abdomen visibly changes during the shortness of breath. When a baby inhales, the abdomen looks extremely sucked in, to the point that the ribs are clearly visible from under the skin. When the baby exhales, the abdomen is distended and pushed out. This is because the abdomen reflects the movement in the lungs, which becomes extreme as inhalation and exhalation are attempted. The trachea, which is directly above the abdomen and in the middle of the ribs, also moves vigorously with the breathing movement. Normal breathing moves the abdomen as well, but the movements are slight and slow. Normally, breathing does not lead to suddenly visible differences in the abdomen size between inhalation and exhalation. Also, the abdomen responds to gasping. Visibility of the ribs is also a serious sign, possibly an indication of weight loss. In such cases, the lost weight is attributed to lack of feeding and increased exhaustion due to struggling with the disease or the infection causing shortness of breath. MAKES BABIES APPEAR BLUISH When an infant is suffering from breathlessness, he/she usually has bluish skin. The reason for that is lack of oxygen. Oxygenated blood which carries oxygen to all tissues has a red color while deoxygenated blood, which has already deposited oxygen to the tissues, is bluish. The unusual bluish color in the skin signifies that there is deoxygenated blood where oxygenated blood should be, which means that tissues are not getting the oxygen they need. This symptom is especially apparent in the hands and feet because those are the farthest from the heart and lungs. It becomes difficult for the blood to reach them and provide efficient oxygen, because of weak heart and lung functions. Blood is also a source of heat, so infants who have trouble breathing, hands and feet may be exceptionally cold. Content Source Featured Image Source

These popular 20 games will boost development of your baby

Your baby's attention span will vary a lot, depending on his age, his temperament, and his mood. Sometimes he'll enjoy a game for as long as 20 minutes, but more often you'll need to modify the game every five minutes or so. You'll know your baby's loving your antics when he's turning toward you, smiling, or laughing. But if he squirms away from you, looks away, or cries, it's time to change the activity. Not every baby will catch on to every game. Don't allow this to freak you out, but of course if you have concerns about a possible developmental delay, talk to your baby's doctor. Birth to 3 months To the outside observer, a newborn basically seems like a pooping ball of protoplasm. Your baby will mostly just lie there, except when he's crying. So how can you connect with him and have fun? Your best chance of doing this is to engage your baby's senses: touch, sight (remember, your baby is still very nearsighted), smell, and hearing. (Let's leave taste out for now.) By the end of his first three months, your baby may reach out and try to grab things and will be fascinated by sounds, smells, and patterns. Note: It may take your newborn several seconds to respond to you or he may not respond much at all. Be patient – you may need to keep trying or wait a while for him to enter an alert, responsive state. 10 games your baby will love: Newborn to 3 months old Newborns constantly take in new sights, sounds, smells, and more. Help your baby learn about the world by trying these 10 fun games. Dance, Dance Revolution In the afternoons when my own baby got grumpy, nothing worked as well as dancing with her. I'd put on some music – she preferred soulful tunes from Stevie Wonder and James Brown – and either put her in the sling or hold her in my arms. At first she preferred soft swaying. Later on she liked me to swing her in the air or bump her up and down rather rudely. (Just be sure to offer neck support and don't shake your baby.) When your arms get tired, put your baby down and keep up the dance. Silly exaggerated movements like jazz hands or shaking your butt are particularly funny to babies. Close the drapes so the neighbors won't see. Let's Look at Stuff Most of your early playtime will be spent showing your baby stuff. Any object in the house that won't poison, electrocute, or otherwise hurt him is fair game. Babies love egg beaters, spoons, wire whisks, spatulas, books and magazines with pictures, bottles of shampoo or conditioner (don't leave your baby alone with these!), record albums, colorful fabrics or clothes, fruits and vegetables, and so on. Keep a little stash of objects beside you and sit with your baby. When the moment's right, whip something out like a magician. "Look, Kyle, Daddy's bicycle bell." Hold the object still about a foot from his face and stare at it yourself. Hey, now that you look at it, that bicycle bell is kind of interesting. Congratulations! You're thinking like a baby! Oh, and don't expect babies to really "get" books at this age. You'll know they're enjoying them by their way of getting still and watchful when you bring a favorite book out. Babies don't tend to sit through a whole story, though, and when they're a few months older they'll grab the books from you and close them. This is all developmental stuff. Babies love looking at books and cuddling close to you, but they usually don't care about the plot. Journey Into Mom's Closet You haven't spent a lifetime accumulating a closetful of bright, slinky, tactile clothing for nothing. Dig into your closet and show your baby your cashmere sweater, your cottony-soft favorite jeans, your brilliant plaid skirt. Run soft or silky fabrics over her face, hands, and feet. Lay fuzzy stuff down on the floor and put your baby on top of it. In a few months, your baby will want to run her hands over anything beaded, embroidered, or otherwise embellished. But for now, she may just be content to gaze in wonder. Hey! What's Over My Head? You'll be amazed at how much fun you can have with the simplest stuff around your house. Here are three ideas to start you off: Tie or tape some ribbons, fabric, or other interesting streamers onto a wooden spoon and dangle them gently over and in front of your baby's face. Take a floaty scarf and fling it into the air, letting it settle on your baby's head. Tie a toy to an elastic string (like the kind used for cat toys) and bounce it up and down in front of your baby's face, saying "Boing! Boing!" every time it descends. Remember, never leave your baby alone with strings or ribbons that could encircle his neck or that he could get into his mouth. The Diva Within You may have a terrible voice – but your kid doesn't know it! Now's the time to sing at volume 10, so set free that opera voice inside you. Your baby may like absolutely anything you sing, but there are some classics you should know. "Itsy Bitsy Spider" was the only song that made my baby stop crying when she was on a jag. And most kids like any song with movements – "The Wheels on the Bus," "Row, Row, Row Your Boat," "Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes," and "Patty-Cake," to name a few. (If you don't remember the words to a favorite song, just look online.) You may feel silly at first, but as your child gets into it, so will you. Try adding your baby's name to the song: "Old Mac Ethan had a farm," "Kate is my sunshine, my only sunshine," and so on. Try songs with silly sounds or animal noises in them, like "Witch Doctor" or "How Much Is That Doggie in the Window?" Try singing a song in a low growly voice and then in a high squeaky voice, to see which gets the most reaction. Try singing the song breathily into your baby's ear, or use a hand puppet (or a napkin or sock willing to play the part of a hand puppet). And get used to singing, because this could begin to eat up a significant portion of your day. 4 to 6 months At this age, your baby will become a lot more physical, learning how to roll over and even sit up. She can now hold, handle, and mouth objects, and she'll spend a good part of her busy days doing so (meaning extra vigilance is needed on your part). Games can get more physical now. Your baby might enjoy knee rides or tickle games. She's also more responsive to you, making noises and meeting your eyes. Smell the Spice Rack You're in the kitchen, trying to throw some kind of dinner together when your baby starts wailing. Take him over to the spice rack and introduce him to the intoxicating scent of cinnamon. Rub some on your hand and put it up to your baby's nose. (Don't let it get in his eyes or mouth.) If he likes it, try others: Vanilla, peppermint, cumin, cloves, nutmeg, and many other herbs and spices have intriguing fragrances that your baby might love. Other household goods are fragrant, too: Dad's shaving lotion, Mom's hand cream. Sniff out everything yummy – just be careful not to let your baby eat it! 10 games your baby will love: 4 to 6 months old Now that your baby is more alert, make him smile with these 10 fun games that are perfect for bonding and developing new skills. Bubbles, Bubbles Everywhere There's something magical about bubbles, and at this point your baby can see far enough away to focus on them. Blow bubbles when she's getting fussy waiting for the bus and watch the tears dry up. Blow bubbles in the park to attract older kids who'll caper nearby and entertain your baby in the process. Blow bubbles in the bathtub or out on the porch when it's late afternoon and your baby is cranky. Bubbles are unbelievably cheap, easily transportable, and endlessly fascinating for babies. I'm Gonna Get You! Your baby is old enough to have a sense of anticipation now. And no baby can resist your coming at him mock-menacingly with a threat of hugs, kisses, or tickles. Here's what you could say: "Hey, Sweetpea! I see you over there sitting up! Well, that just makes you closer to my lips and I'm going to come over there and kiss you! I'm going to steal a kiss, baby! I'm coming! I'm coming! I... gotcha!" Then cover your baby in smooches. In our house we threaten to eat the baby and punctuate our advances with lip chomps on her fat little feet. A delicacy! When your baby's older you can modify this game to include a chase around the house – this works wonderfully as a way to get your child out the door when you're in a rush. This Little Piggy Touch your baby's toes in turn, starting with the big toe. Say, "This little piggy went to market, this little piggy stayed home, this little piggy had roast beef, this little piggy had none. And this little piggy went wee-wee-wee all the way home." As you say that last part, run your fingers up your baby's belly. This game is useful for putting on socks and shoes or distracting your baby during diaper changes. You can also play this game in the bathtub with a squirt bottle targeting your baby's toes. Find two perfect, development-boosting activities for every week of your baby's first year. Tummy Time It's important to have your baby spend time on her tummy, even if she protests vociferously. Get down on the floor with your baby. Look her in the eye as you lie on your own belly. Lay your baby down on a towel and use it to gently roll her from side to side. Try saying, "Oops-a-daisy, Oops-a-daisy" as you roll her. Fly, Baby, Fly! Now that your baby can hold his head up, it's time to hoist him into the air. You can play that he's a rocket ship, flying him over you and making realistic rocket noises. You can play that your baby is in an elevator, which advances up floor by floor before sinking quickly to the bottom (my husband likes to bump noses with our baby and say "Ding!" at this point). Or pretend that your baby's doing a helicopter traffic report. 7 to 9 months Your baby's becoming an expert at sitting and may soon be crawling as well. Encourage these physical feats by celebrating each new milestone with claps and a cheer: "Yay, you sat up! Amazing baby!" The ability to transfer objects from hand to hand and the fabled pincer grasp are part of your baby's increasing hand control (which means you'll be forced to carry a container of O-shaped cereal with you at all times for the next year). Your baby also begins to understand that when an object moves out of sight, it hasn't disappeared from the face of the earth. This discovery makes games like peek-a-boo a favorite. Touch It, Hold It, Bang It If your baby has one object, she'll bang it on the table. If she has two objects, she'll bang them together, hold them up to the light, squint at them, bang them separately on the table, hit the table with both at the same time, see if the object sounds different when hit using the left hand rather than the right hand, and on and on. Help her out by handing over objects that make interesting sounds: hollow containers, metal spoons, bells. Pay attention to tactile sensations as well: Your baby will be fascinated by an embossed greeting card or the slickness of Mom's enameled jewelry box. A baby with strands of cooked spaghetti to play with will be thoroughly entranced. I Can Control the World Babies love cause and effect at this age, as in: I do this, the light comes on. I do that, the light goes off. Showing your baby how to work light switches, faucets, doorbells, and more will thrill him – but can make life more difficult for you when he insists on being held up to work the lights yet again. Instead, you may want to offer a other dangers (dressers with drawers pulled out can turn over on a child) and then let your baby go to town. Obstacle Course If your baby's crawling, scooting, or walking, she may enjoy the challenge of having to move over things. (This is great for developing her motor skills, too. Pillows, tired parents, and laundry make good obstacles. Sleeping cats do not. So Many Variations on Peek-a-boo The classic: Hold up a towel between your face and your baby's and ask, "Where's Sam? There's Sam!" over and over again. You can vary this game in a million ways. Hide behind a door and make your baby push it open to see you. Hide behind a chair and pop out first from above then from the sides. Go behind a corner with another person and alternate who jumps out and yells "Boo!" Keep a selection of hats behind the couch and pop up wearing a different one each time. A surefire laugh-getter is to put a hat on your head, low enough to cover your eyes, and let your baby take it off, saying "Oh!" in surprise each time he does it. (This will also guarantee that you'll never wear a hat in peace again.) Roll Play Babies are fascinated by balls and how they move. You'll get a big laugh by juggling or tossing balls up in the air and letting them hit the floor while you make a silly sound effect: "Whoops!" Roll a soft ball toward your baby and watch her grab and squeeze it. Eventually, with encouragement, she'll roll the ball back toward you. And someday she'll be able to kick and toss the ball or drop it into a big bowl or bucket. For now, bounce and roll. 10 to 12 months Developmentally, your baby has suddenly morphed into an almost-toddler. Games that allow him to practice so-called gross motor skills such as standing, pulling up, and climbing are important for him now. Your baby will also like to work on his fine motor skills by fiddling with the tag on your shirt or the pages of a book – and maybe your breasts or bra if he's still nursing. Rearrange and Re-rearrange Your baby is figuring out the connections between objects in the world. She'll love to stack and arrange objects, as well as fill and empty them. Give your baby a box that's easy to open (like a shoe box) and show her how to put things inside and take them out. At our house, this game quickly evolves into "Take everything out of Mommy's purse and fling it wildly around the living room," which is why I no longer carry change or pens. Another way to play this game: Get a bunch of cups (maybe even stackable measuring cups – ooh, two toys in one!) and show your baby how to pour water, sand, or cornmeal from one to the other, or into a larger container. The Endless Cruise Once your baby is up on his feet, you can encourage cruising by placing a favorite toy at the far end of the couch or over on the coffee table. Try enticing your baby by putting one of your toys, such as your or sunglasses, a distance away and cruising on your knees toward it. Your baby may find this amusing and attempt to join you. Encourage your baby to push an object around the room. Push toys and large empty boxes work well. Avoid folding chairs, which can fold up unexpectedly. Top That Kid Babies this age love to imitate. Encourage this behavior by making a ridiculous noise and then nodding at your baby to go ahead and try a noise. She may imitate you or make her own noise, which you can imitate. Or you can make up a new noise of your own. You can also play this game with faces or movements – our kid likes to raise her arms in a V shape and wave them around. When we do it back, her expression is of someone witnessing magic. The Bath Is Fun No longer is your baby content to sit in the tub and be washed. Older babies want to stand up, splash, grab your hair, pat the shower curtain, and so on. (Note: Never leave a baby unattended in the bath, not even for a minute.) Encourage the fun by adding lots of toys to the tub. Plenty of stuff around the house can be endlessly filled, drained, poured from or into, and floated. Pile up some plastic cups, yogurt containers, funnels, and squeeze bottles, and bring them into the bath along with any of your baby's plastic toys. Poke holes in the top of a plastic bottle with a flat cap to make a homemade watering can. Let your baby feel the sensation of the water dripping onto him and show him how to cut off the flow by blocking it with his hand. Use your homemade toy to give his rubber ducky a shower. At the end of the bath, drain the toys in a plastic colander or a net bag suction-cupped to the side of the tub. Hopefully your baby is clean, happy, and ready to sleep. Wasn't that fun?

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Baby developmental milestones chart: 7 to 12 months

  Though you’ll find some specifics, like when babies sit up , “normal development” refers to these skills: Gross motor skills: using large groups of muscles, balancing, and changing position (sitting, standing, walking, etc.) Fine motor skills: using hands for smaller, more refined movements (playing, eating, etc.) Language skills: communicating via body language and understanding what others are saying Cognitive skills: more refined thinking skills, like reasoning and remembering Social skills: expressing feelings and responding to the feelings of others one in six children will have a developmental delay, but that doesn’t mean your baby will face long-term issues. Missing a few monthly milestones is not cause for panic. There are many factors that influence when infant milestones happen. In most cases, your baby just needs a little extra time. Babies born prematurely, for example, are more likely to hit each milestone counting from their due date, not their day of birth. Talk to your pediatrician if you have any concerns. 7 Month Baby Milestones In month 7, baby’s eyesight is improving, allowing for more coordination.  Transfering objects from one hand to another While your baby has explored objects by touch and mouth for months now, around month 7, baby will start transferring objects from from one hand to another, displaying spatial awareness. Improving vision Babies eye control and eye-body coordination becomes more refined. Improved depth perception allows babies to reach for toys and other objects. What’s more, babies’ color vision should be fairly strong by this age! 8 Month Baby Milestones In month 8, baby is on the move and better able to communicate with you.  Learning object permanence Their brains continue to amaze as they start to understand object permanence. This is the psychological phenomenon that helps folks understand that when something disappears from view, it doesn’t mean that it’s gone forever. (In other words, when mommy leaves the room, she will come back.) It may seem like small potatoes to grown adults, but think of the amazing intellectual leaps this takes for infants! Crawling The developmental milestone of crawling may not happen all at once or in a linear fashion—and some babies will only crawl for a short period of time. Others babies won’t crawl the way you’d expect to, crawling sideways or scooting their bottom along the floor. Crawling is very important—it not only strengthens baby’s muscles, but it also improves baby’s brain function. It’s tempting to hold baby up and try to teach them to walk—it’s such an exciting time—but a little bit of patience can really help baby. Experts saycrawling improves hand-eye coordination, plus improves comprehension, concentration, and memory.  Saying first words Your baby will be communicating now more than ever by the end of these months. She will be repeating sounds like “bababa” or, very adorably, “mamama.” (Though fair warning, mamas: Baby is likely to say Dada first.) Additionally, words start to carry meaning at this stage. You’ll find she understands simple words like, “no.” What’s more, she’ll begin to use her fingers to point, further associating movement with communication and comprehension. 9 Month Baby Milestones In month 9, baby’s brain is working hard—he/she is starting to use objects for their intended purpose.  Standing Babies should be able to stand holding on to your hands. You may even witness your baby pulling himself up. Improved dexterity Those jerky arm movements have long since disappeared. Babies are now able to wield objects more efficiently. Their improved dexterity might mean banging or shaking toys (or anything else they can get their hands on! Careful!)  This baby milestone also indicates increased cognitive function. You may notice baby beginning to use household objects for their intended purpose. For example, they may mimic drinking out of a cup (or actually do so!). This will also become apparent with pretend play, which should be just about starting. Look forward to baby pretending to talk on the phone and engaging in other imaginative play. 10 Month Baby Milestones In month 10, the fun really begins—baby understands and engages in simple games.  Cruising Baby may be walking while holding onto you or furniture. Playing interactive games By this point, babies can understand simple games (think peekaboo), find hidden objects, or take things in and out of a container. Encourage all of these behaviors! They will help develop those all important fine motor skills and every bit of playtime is also learning time. 11 Month Baby Milestones In month 11, you’ll notice baby’s flourishing personality and his/her desire to explore.  Starting to explore Baby will take all of those newfound gross motor skills like sitting, crawling, and cruising to start checking everything out. No cabinet or shelf is safe, my friends! Take steps to baby proof and make extra sure cleaning supplies, toiletries, and medicine cabinets are well off limits for baby. Better yet, work on getting any toxic junk out of your house! (See how to make natural cleaners for your home.) Developing their distinct personality Babies start to understand emotions better, reading and reacting to your emotional state. This level of communication and interaction deepens as they are able to use their bourgeoning vocabulary to state what they want and need. 12 Month Baby Milestones In month 12, baby’s brain has more than doubled in size! He/she is walking and talking.  Beginning to walk Here’s another developmental milestone you’ve been waiting for! Around 12 months, babies may begin to walk! They may still need a bit of help or support, but the pitter patter of those precious little feet are on the horizon. Improving language skills Watch out! At this stage, children should start repeating the words you say. They should already have a small vocabulary, and they will be practicing simple gestures like waving bye or shaking their head yes and no. Baby Milestones Chart Month   Milestones Month 1: Baby is getting acquainted with the outside world.     • Reacting to sights and sounds • Displaying reflexes Month 2: Baby’s development centers around his relationship with you and other caregivers.    • Paying attention to faces and recognizing people • Cooing • Smiling • Supporting their own head Month 3: Baby’s working on her coordination.    • Connecting sound, sight, and movement • Grasping objects Month 4: Baby’s cognitive, social, and motor skills start to develop at a rapid pace.     • Copying sounds, movements, and facial expressions • Rolling over • Babbling • Laughing Month 5: Baby’s becoming more expressive and preparing for crawling, pulling himself up, and walking.    • Smiling at the mirror • Expressing new emotions • Refining basic movements Month 6: Baby’s narrowing in on his communication and motor skills.    • Responding to their own name • Moving… a lot • Sitting Month 7: Baby’s eyesight is improving, allowing for more coordination.    • Transfering objects from one hand to another • Improving vision Month 8: Baby is on the move and better able to communicate with you.     • Learning object permanence • Crawling • Saying first words Month 9: Baby’s brain is working hard—he/she is starting to use objects for their intended purpose.     • Standing • Improved dexterity Month 10: The fun really begins—baby understands and engages in simple games.    • Cruising • Playing interactive games Month 11: You’ll notice baby’s flourishing personality and his/her desire to explore.     • Starting to explore • Developing their distinct personality Month 12: Baby’s brain has more than doubled in size! He/she is walking and talking.     • Beginning to walk • Improving language skills What to Do If Your Baby Isn’t Meeting Milestones All of baby’s firsts are important, but missing a few monthly milestones is usually not cause for panic. Your baby’s doctor will be watching for baby’s developmental milestones during each well child visit. If there’s any concern, the pediatrician may recommend a developmental assessment test to determine if any treatment or intervention is needed. If your doctor gives the all clear, but you still have concerns, get a second opinion. Remember: You know your child’s movements and patterns best. Even if it is just a nagging feeling, never be afraid to talk to your healthcare provider about any concerns. content source

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2-month-old, first week: Growth, care and more

Your baby at two months old Drum roll please... It’s the moment you've been waiting for since you met your tiny little baby all those weeks ago. Around now you should be getting your first lopsided smile – not wind, but a perfect little smile. Hopefully it will make all those sleepless nights worthwhile, or at least bearable for a bit longer. Maybe your baby smiled at six weeks old, or maybe you might have to wait another month – it’s not an exact science, so don't worry. Read on below to find out more about the developments you might expect to see from your 2 month old baby. Your baby’s senses at two months old Vision Colour differences are becoming clearer to your baby, and they start to distinguish between colours. Your baby will still prefer bright primary colours and clear, bold designs and shapes but they can now see around 60cm from their face. Encourage your baby by showing them bright pictures. Hearing At 2 months old your babies hearing will be becoming a better listener and they will be able to differentiate between voices they’ve heard more frequently. Regularly talking (or singing) to your baby is a great way to get them used to your voice and also a way to sooth and calm them as they become more familiar. Your baby’s motor skills at two months old  Kicking and waving  Your baby’s movements are becoming less jerky and slightly more co-ordinated. They start to love kicking out when lying down, which is great exercise and helps strengthen their legs. They may also wave their little fists in excitement. At least we hope it’s excitement.  Pushing up and rolling  Your baby may have enough neck muscle power to hold their head up for short periods when they’re lying on their tummy or on your shoulder – but not for long. You might find your baby is now rolling around more. They won’t yet be able to fully roll onto their front (although that will come soon!) but you’ll still want to keep an eye on them if you have them elevated e.g. during a nappy change.  Grasping and unclasping  Your baby was born with a grasping reflex, but they don’t yet know how to let go of things – which is why long-haired mums better be prepared for some painful moments. Around now you may notice them unclasping their fists and trying to wave them.  Other 2 month old baby developments  Drooling  They won’t yet be teething, but you might notice that your baby is starting to drool more (and making a bit of a mess!), as their salivary glands develop. Fear not though, their drool actually contains a lot of bacteria killing enzymes so it’s no bad thing to get it on their toys or other surfaces they’re interacting with.  Sleeping  You may find that your baby is beginning to sleep in more solid blocks (of 5 or 6 hours) but at 2 months old, it’s still very common for your baby to be waking up in the middle of the night.  Reading to your baby  They might not be able to follow along just yet, but reading to your baby can help to sooth them, whilst also helping them to become more familiar with your voice. Try varying the tone and intonation of your voice to keep them interested and build a better connection.  First Immunisations  When your baby is 2 months old you’ll be offered the first round of immunisations which includes protection against a range of diseases including: Rotavirus – A highly infectious virus that can cause gastroenteritis in your baby DTaP/IPV/Hib – Protects against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio and haemophilus influenza Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV) – This protects against pneumococcal infections including pneumonia, meningitis and bronchitis Six-week postnatal check  At around the 6 week mark, both you and your baby will be offered a post-natal check-up. This check up with b to make sure your baby is developing well and is healthy. In this check-up you can expect the nurse to weigh and measure your baby, check their development of hips, heart, genitals and eyes, and also ask you some questions about how they’re feeding.  How to help your baby develop in month two When you’re talking to your baby, give them time to respond to what you are saying with a look or babble. Research shows babies whose parents who allow them to respond  learn to talk earlier This is a great time to introduce a baby gym – they’ll try to bat at the hanging toys, but careful not to overdo it – a five to 10 minute session is enough, and don’t persevere if they cry. Leave it a week or two and try again Lots of mums get embarrassed about talking to their baby and don’t know what on earth to say. One way to get started is to keep up a kind of commentary on what you’re doing, a bit like a Victorian nanny, according to babycare expert Dr Miriam Stoppard. “They would say, ‘now, shall we put our coats on? Now, let’s go out for a walk. That’s right, into the pram we go.’ I think a child should hear words for much of the time they are awake. Babies have a window when they can learn speech, and it’s open from birth” Game of the month  Try playing different types of music and watch your baby kick their legs and listen with intense concentration. If you play a quieter tune you will see them visibly relax (some research says it may even send them to sleep. No promises.) Are they normal? A small note on developmental milestones: it’s really true – all babies are different and although we can encourage them, they will do things at their own pace and in their own time. content source

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