Baby Care

The process of meeting all the needs that a baby may require during the growing up years

Ask anything about baby care

When can you safely give your baby water to drink?

The first food of babies is liquid whether that’s breast milk or formula, and most babies don’t start solids until they are six months old. But you might be wondering: When can babies drink water? When Can Babies Drink Water? For babies 0-6 months: No supplemental water For babies 6-12 months: 59mL to 118mL of water maximum. Most breastfed babies don’t need supplemental water. Once you introduce solids you can introduce water. Formula-fed babies may need a little bit more water, but no more than 118mL. For babies and toddlers 1-3 years old: Many experts recommend 887mL to 1182mL of water. However, if you are still breastfeeding, this quantity is higher. You may talk to your pediatrician about the right quantity of water. Is It okay to give water to a newborn? Healthy babies do not need extra water. Breast milk, formula, or both provide all the fluids they need. Breast milk is made up of 88 percent water, and is sufficient to keep your baby well-hydrated. During the first few days of life, supplementation of any kind interferes with the normal frequency of breastfeeding. If the supplement is water or glucose water, the infant is at increased risk for increased excess weight loss, longer hospital stay, and potential water intoxication.   The dangers of giving a newborn water So babies don’t need to drink water, but what’s the harm in it after those first few days? You may be surprised to learn that giving an infant too much water is actually detrimental. Here are the rare, but dangerous results of too much water: Dehydration: Because a young infant’s kidneys aren’t developed enough to process supplemental water. It can cause them to release excess sodium and water into the urine, which can affect brain activity and lead to dehydration. Malnutrition: Babies who are given water in place of breastmilk or formula fill their bellies up with non-nutritious fluid instead of the healthy calories they need. Too much water can cause your baby to not receive enough nourishment from nursing, and can contribute to low weight gain or failure to thrive. In breastfeeding babies, supplementing with water can also decrease a mother’s milk supply. Water intoxication: Too much water can be toxic to both breastfed and formula-fed newborns. This occurs when there’s an imbalance of sodium and electrolytes in the infant’s body. It can cause irritability, brain swelling, unresponsiveness, and even seizures.   Content source Featured image source

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What to get when you are Expecting

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Essential items to pack in your hospital bag

Your delivery is just round the corner and you are so stressed that you keep forgetting what to keep for the D-Day. So here's a quick check list for you to organize yourself and enjoy your less chaotic days. Smartphone and Charger It's true that today you just can't be without your phone. Since you may be messaging, calling or replying a lot, before and after the delivery, keep your chargers handy, too.  Important Documents A picture ID, health insurance information, and hospital registration forms. Even if you've already registered at the hospital, some hospitals need to confirm your records before they can admit you. Toiletries Deodorant, body wash, shampoo, facial cleansing wipes, toothpaste, and a toothbrush are necessities. Don’t forget the lip balm and moisturizer – hospitals rooms may make your skin dry, so keep all your personal stuff ready. Hair Care Products Head bands, shampoo, conditoner, dry shampoo, oil, and hair brush. Cash and Change Hospital food for your partner and tips to the staff at the end of your stay will make you run out of change. So stuff your wallets.Homecoming Outfit for Baby Pack a newborn-size kimono-style shirt, with footed pants so you don't have to bring socks. You'll likely get a receiving blanket and hat in the hospital, so skip those unless you've got your heart set on a specific style. Extra Outfit for You Here's a hint: You'll probably still look about 5 months pregnant, so skip your non-maternity skinnies and pack your favorite maternity dress or leggings and a tunic. (Trust us: Not fitting into your going-home outfit is a bummer!) Sleepwear and Underwear A cotton nightie will be much more comfortable than a hospital gown, and a robe will come in handy for walking the hallways. Several pairs of undies are also a must for any hospital bag checklist (briefs, maternity, or disposables like Depends) if you don't want to wear the mesh underwear the hospital gives you after delivery.Flip-Flops Bring flip-flops for the shower or to wear home if your feet are swollen. Slippers and/or Heavy Socks Keep your toes toasty and clean, whether you're in bed or strolling around on the cold tile floor. Bring a pair that's easily laundered, as they may get a bit dirty. Extra Undies and Extra-Absorbent Pads You're going to need these after delivery. It might also be helpful to pack lidocaine spray or witch hazel pads (to relieve pain from tearing). Nursing Bra Bring a nursing tank or bra that's comfortable enough to sleep in.  Music, Movies, and Magazines, Books. Load up your smartphone or tablet with tunes and anything you might want to binge-watch on Netflix. It'll help district you—and your partner—during a long labor. An Extra Bag or Two With all the goodies from the hospital—diapers, blankets, and creams—and all the gifts from well wishers, you're bound to have more stuff coming out than you did going in. For the Baby: Most of the things will be provided by the hospital and you will be charged for those anyway, but you could keep these. A set of clothes to take baby back home in A few sets of clothes/onesies/tops for baby to change into while in the hospital Caps  A blanket for the crib A blanket to carry baby back home in Diapers  Wipes

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7 Simple Tips To Make Your Baby Comfortable In Summers

A newborn’s skin is extremely delicate and so is the baby's immune system. Chemicals, fragrances, and dyes in clothing, detergents, and baby products can cause irritation to the baby’s skin along with other complications such as rashes, dryness and chaffing. In the summer season, the hot winds can cause even further dryness to the baby’s skin. The first year of life is very crucial for the baby, so, it is of utmost importance to protect your child’s skin in the hot summer months. Here are 7 simple tips to make your baby comfortable in summers: Increase your baby’s fluid intake - One can easily get dehydrated in the summer season, so make it a point to give enough water to your little one. If your child is younger than 6 months of age and is still breastfeeding, then you need to increase your own intake of fluids so that you can produce enough milk. Give the baby lots of seasonal fruits and juices Include lots of seasonal fruits and their juices in your little one’s diet since they not only provide the much-needed nutrients to your child’s body but also supply water to him/her. Make your baby wear light cotton clothes - Always dress up your child in light-colored cotton clothes so that his/her skin is able to breathe and he/she doesn’t get any rashes from tight clothes. Summer Skin Care - Baby skin is very delicate and needs to be handled with utmost care. Here’s how you can take care of your baby’s delicate skin in the summers- Wash - Resist the urge to bathe the baby too frequently since this can remove the natural oils of the baby’s skin and making it dry and vulnerable. Use only a  pea-sized amount of a natural body wash to bathe your baby. You can use coconut-oil based cleansers to clean the baby’s delicate skin since they soothe the baby’s skin without causing any harmful effects. One such cleanser is The Moms Co. Natural Baby Wash and it has the added benefits of avocado oil, chamomile oil, and aloe vera gel, which soften your baby’s delicate skin. Shampoo - Do not shampoo the baby’s hair every day. When it comes to newborn skincare, “Less is more”. You need to use only a pea-sized amount of shampoo to rinse the baby’s scalp and you need not shampoo the baby’s head every day. A shampoo with organic ingredients is more suitable since you definitely don’t want to take any chances with your newborn’s skin. The Moms Co. Natural Baby Shampoo is a coconut oil-based cleanser that cleanses the baby’s scalp gently and also conditions the baby’s hair with its organic argan and moringa oil.  Moisturize - The best time to moisturize the baby’s body is right after a bath because this is the time when the skin is able to absorb the moisture easily. Using a mild lotion on the skin after a bath. So, make it a point to apply a mild body lotion on the baby’s skin after giving him/her a bath. One of the best options is to apply The Moms Co. Natural Baby Lotion, which has the right ingredients such as organic shea butter, cocoa butter and organic jojoba oil to hydrate and nourish your baby’s delicate skin. This natural baby lotion is mineral-free and this makes even more reliable for your little one. Prevent Sweat - Baby skin is prone to rashes due to sweat so, keep your baby’s skin sweat-free with a talc-free powder during the hot summer months. Nowadays most powders contain talc and fragrances which can be harmful to the baby but The Moms Co. Natural Talc-Free Baby Powder is prepared with cornstarch and helps to absorb the extra moisture within the folds of your child’s skin. It’s organic chamomile and calendula oils help to soothe your baby’s delicate skin. 5. Wash baby clothes before being worn - Before touching your baby’s skin, the new clothes that you bought, might have been in a clothes rack for a long time, might have accumulated dirt and would have been touched by many others. Always wash your baby’s clothes with a mild detergent and an antiseptic before making him/her wear them. This helps to get rid of all the dirt and germs. 6. Avoid taking the baby out during peak hours - As much as possible, avoid taking the baby out during the time when the sun is the hottest, i.e. between 10 am - 4 pm. Schedule outings either before or after this time. Whenever you step out, make the baby wear a hat and carry an umbrella to provide shade to your little one. 7. Do not go in and out of the AC too often - A sudden temperature change can lead to a runny nose and also affect the baby’s skin adversely. Whenever you need to take the baby out of an airconditioned room, turn off the AC, wait for 5-10 minutes and then go. When you’re coming from outside with your little one, do not turn on the AC immediately. Allow the baby’s body to cool a bit under the fan and then turn on the AC. For more such informative articles and videos, download the Mylo App now! Register on the app if you haven't already and get tips worth Rs. 10,000/- for free! Disclaimer: This blog is supported by The Moms Co.

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7 signs to show that your child loves you

We love them endlessly, and we constantly tell them that as well. However, most of our little ones haven’t mastered the art of speech yet. But, they do tell us they love us in different ways given below: 1. She stares into your eyes: Newborns love to look at faces, and yours is her favorite. That soulful gaze is a survival instinct designed to attract love and attention from a caregiver. It's also the beginning of her love for you – she's realizing just how important you are in her life. 2. She recognizes your smell: Given the choice between a dozen fragrant roses and your sweaty, milk-stained T-shirt, your baby will go for the shirt every time. "Even a 1-week-old will turn his head toward a breast pad soaked with his mother's milk. According to experts, when it comes to your newborn, nothing smells sweeter than you. 3. She smiles at you: The first time your baby gives you a true, fabulous grin is a magical moment. It's her way of saying "I love you." 4. She wants you around: About halfway through your baby's first year, you'll notice that she's not happy with your absence. She may scrunch up her face or cry when you step out of the room, and she'll smile upon your return which is a sign of her growing attachment. 5. She shares your interests: Whether you are involved in dusting the home or washing the clothes, if you scrutinise it, your baby will do the same. Called mutual attention, this behavior can start when your baby is just a few months old, but it's more pronounced at 9 to 12 months. "It's a sign that your child is engaged with you and values what you're paying attention to.  6. She uses you as a shield: Don't be surprised if your baby buries her head in your chest when someone new appears on the scene. "Stranger anxiety" is a normal phase, and turning to you for protection means your baby loves you and trusts you to keep her safe. 7. She turns to you for rescue: You're walking through the park when a big dog runs up to your toddler. She raises her arms for you to pick her up and hold her close. She trusts you to help her, and that's a way of showing love.   Content source Featured image source

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Disadvantages of Baby Potty Training

8 Tips To Potty Train Your Child

Advantages of Baby Potty Training

6 home remedies of gas relief for babies

  Gas in the stomach can be the air swallowed through the mouth, or it can be the gas naturally produced by bacteria within the gastrointestinal tract. A baby can develop a gassy tummy due to any of the following reasons : Drinking formula too fast: Babies who breastfeed feed at a controlled pace, but formula-fed infants tend to gulp down a lot more when the bottle is held vertically into the mouth. This leads to ingestion of surplus air that gets trapped within the stomach and causes bloating. Poor latch to the nipple: Babies who do not latch properly to the breast or bottle nipple tend to leave a considerable gap between their mouth and the nipple. This gap can permeate the surrounding air, which the baby swallows along with the milk. Formula mixing and type: Some babies may develop gas after consuming a particular kind of formula. If you mix formula by shaking it in a bottle, then it can infuse a lot of gas in the liquid, that eventually ends up in the baby’s stomach. Not burping the baby between feeds: You should burp your baby between feeds since they cannot do it themselves. Leaving the baby without burping leads to accumulation of gas inside the belly. Too much crying: If the baby had been crying a lot, then they could inhale a lot of air that accumulates within the stomach and causes gassiness. Mother’s diet: What you eat is what you pass to your baby through breast milk. Certain food items may contain compounds that can get into breast milk and cause gas in babies. Eating various solid foods: Older infants and toddlers eat a wide variety of food. Bacteria within the gut can produce excess gas when digesting specific food items. What Are The Symptoms Of A Gassy Baby?   A baby with gas in the tummy displays the following symptoms : Fussiness and irritability: It is probably the first sign you notice, especially after feeding the baby. Your baby will inexplicably become fussy and irritable while otherwise being alright. Bloating: A baby’s bloated belly may indicate trapped gas. The belly will also be firm to touch. Pulling legs towards tummy: The baby will try to relieve any discomfort caused by bloating by pulling the legs upwards. Rubbing belly: Infants may also rub their belly while older infants and toddlers may hold or point towards the tummy to express discomfort. Gurgling noises from the stomach: If the surroundings are quiet, then you may even hear gurgling sounds from the baby’s belly. It could be a result of gas moving inside the gastrointestinal tract. It is most likely to occur sometime after a feed. Crying while squirming: If the gas causes severe bloating, then a baby may cry and squirm due to the discomfort. Sometimes, gassiness and bloating can cause extreme discomfort, warranting medical attention. Home Remedies For Gas In Babies A few natural remedies can work effectively as preventive measures for gas among infants. Parents must try the following steps at home when the baby displays symptoms of gas: Burp: Timely burping after a feed prevents accumulation of gas in the baby’s gastrointestinal tract. After every feed, hold the baby in your arms such that their head rests on your shoulder. Gently tap and rub the baby’s back between the shoulders till you hear a burp. Make sure to place a cloth on your shoulder since babies normally tend to regurgitate small amounts of liquid from their stomach. Basic baby exercises: One of the best exercises for gas in babies is bicycle kicks. Lay your baby on the back on a soft surface. Move their legs up and down on a regular basis. The exercise will help your baby relieve the gas and feel better.   Give tummy time: Experts suggest that regular tummy time improves upper body strength among infants. Adequate abdominal muscle strength allows the gut to relieve itself from gas. The pressure on the belly during tummy time also helps in the removal of gas. Tummy massage: Gentle clockwise massage around the navel stimulates the movement of food and gas through the gastrointestinal tract. You can consult a paediatrician or a certified paediatric massage therapist to learn specific massage techniques to relieve gas in babies. Firm nipple latch is important: Check if your baby is latching right to prevent them from gulping air while they feed. The baby is holding on right when their mouth covers the entire nipple.  A good latch also causes suckling sounds, which let you know that the baby is feeding properly. Babies with some orthodontic problems tend to have a tough time with nipple latching. Get your baby checked by the doctor if you feel they could have a problem. You can also try different bottle nipples. A small or big bottle nipple could cause a baby to suction air. Do not let the baby lie down with a bottle placed vertically in their mouth. Instead, control the flow of the milk by using techniques like paced bottle feeding. Switch formulas: If you suspect the current formula is causing gas, then try another. Sometimes the baby may have gas if they have lactose intolerance. If the symptoms of gas persist for long, you should consult a doctor. Can Solid Food Cause Gas In Babies? Yes. Some foods can make the gastrointestinal tract of a baby more susceptible to the production of gas: VEGETABLES FRUITS CEREAL AND GRAINS MILK PRODUCTS Cabbage Pears Cereal Cheese Cauliflower Apples Whole wheat Yogurt Broccoli Peaches Bran   Onions       Beans – nearly all types       The baby can eat most of the above foods, except milk products, on attaining the age of six months . Do keep in mind that solids are essential for the baby to meet their recommended dietary allowance (RDA). So instead of avoiding them totally, decrease the portion size and serve them during multiple feeds in a day. In case of foods such as wheat, you can consult a doctor if there is too much gas since it could be an indicator of allergy. While food eaten by the baby is a plausible cause for gas, what the mother eats may also lead to gassiness in breastfed infants.   Can The Mother’s Diet Cause Gas In ABreastfeeding Baby? Yes. Usually, gassy vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and beans can affect the baby. Some babies may develop gas when the mother eats spicy foods. The effect of the foods eaten may vary from mother to mother, so watch out for what you eat and how it affects your baby to determine the ideal diet when you breastfeed. Pediatric experts state that unless your baby develops gassiness within six hours of you eating a specific food, there is no need to stop eating it (11). Remember, some gas in babies is normal. You pass the nutrients you get through fruit and vegetables to your baby. Therefore, avoid eating a food item if your baby has too much trouble, but pause consumption albeit temporarily. Content source  Featured image source

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Seven-weeks old baby: Health, growth, care and more

At 7 weeks old, your little one is going through a lot of growth and development. Every day might seem to bring new surprises, but here’s what you can expect as a parent of a 7-week-old baby. Your Growing Baby You can expect your 7-week-old baby to continue their plotted development on the growth chart specific to their personal development. At this time, they will: Continue to gain about 1.5 to 2 pounds a month Grow about 10 inches (25 centimeters) between the time of birth and 12 months Have a head circumference that grows at about 2 centimeters a month Despite the fact that your baby is always growing and developing, babies will not always grow at a constant, regular rate. They may instead be more apt to have periods of rapid growth followed by slower growth. So, if it seems like they are moving out of those newborn onesies and into 3-month-old outfits seemingly overnight, it's normal. Developmental Milestones Although every baby is different, your 7-week-old baby should be making the following physical and developmental milestones appropriate for this age. Body Holds objects in their hand. Unlike the reflexive clutching skills that your baby has displayed so far, your little one now has more strength to be able to hold items on their own. Begins to bat at objects. Your baby might not quite be able to grab items out of their reach just yet, but you may notice them start to bat at objects, especially overhead toys, like play mats or swings and bouncer seats with mobiles. Brain After a big growth spurt in week 6, it might feel like your 7-week-old baby is settling down a bit. You may notice more frequent periods of calmness and alertness as they study the world around them. It's not random—they really are learning more each and every moment. Thanks to all of that new brain growth, take note of some of these new skills. Tracking objects or people. Feel like you’re constantly being watched? You are! Your little one is learning to keep eyes on you at all times as they gain the ability to follow objects with their eyes as they move. Test this new skill by holding an object in front of your baby’s eyes, then moving it slowly from side to side or just walk across the room. Your baby will best be able to track items or people moving horizontally; tracking vertical or diagonal movements will come in the next several months. Smiling. Your baby’s first smiles may have occurred last week or will develop this week. As the days go on, your baby will flash more and more smiles your way as they figure out that their smiles lead to mom smiles. Babies love to make you smile and even at this young age, they are figuring out how to get what they want by being adorable.  When to Be Concerned All babies develop at different rates and babies who were born prematurely or who have special needs may have different developmental milestones to meet according to their own timetables. For full-term babies who have no other medical conditions, you will want to talk to your pediatrician at 7 weeks old if your baby: Is not able to hold his or her head up Cannot track horizontal movements Appears to be developing a flat spot on either the back of the head or either side Cannot turn his or her head Baby Care Basics This week is a good time to make tummy time a consistent part of your daily routine if you haven’t done it already. Tummy time is important at this age, especially because your baby has gained the neck muscles necessary to hold up their head, but those muscles may be underutilized if your baby is spending a lot of time on their back. If a baby spends too much time on their back without changing position, they may be at risk for developing positional plagiocephaly, or a flat head. Increasing tummy time can help, but in some cases, it may require a specially fitted helmet for your baby. Without sufficient tummy time, babies may also have delays in other development milestones, such as rolling over, sitting up, and crawling, because the muscles they need are not strong enough. Get started on tummy time with these tips: Work your way up. Start with shorter periods of time, from a few minutes, and work your way up to 10- to 20-minute periods of tummy twice a day. If you haven’t done a lot of tummy time yet, your baby may not like it very much at first. That’s okay—they just need more practice. Remember tummy time doesn’t have to be on the floor. Holding your baby to your chest counts for tummy time, too, because it will still get those muscles working. Use a play mat. Many activity mats and play mats have playful, colorful patterns that your little one can look at and study to make tummy time more fun. Use a pillow. Breastfeeding pillows are especially helpful for tummy time—just be sure you never leave your baby unsupervised around a pillow or on the floor. Get involved! If your little one is resisting tummy time, join in on the fun by getting down on the floor with them. Feeding & Nutrition Your baby may still be experiencing a significant amount of gas at this age. It could be completely normal and your baby will outgrow it, or it could be caused by breast milk or infant formula. If your baby is formula-fed, try experimenting with different types of formula. Your baby’s digestive system may have changed since the newborn days, so it may be worth re-visiting other brands or types of formula that you tried in the past without success. A formula that didn’t work for your baby at 2 weeks may just work at 7 weeks. If your baby is breastfed, think about what you are consuming that may be causing gassiness in your infant. Some common culprits of foods that can lead to your baby getting gas through breast milk include cow's milk and dairy products, vegetables (like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, onions, and peppers), cucumbers, garlic, and chocolate.   Sleep This week also marks a significant sleep milestone for many infants. According to a study in Archives of Disease in Childhood, the peak age for infant fussiness and crying at night is between 5 and 6 weeks. And although your infant probably won't sleep through the night (defined as sleeping longer periods of time, not necessarily a full eight-hour stretch like an adult) until around 13 weeks, you may be moving past the peak age of evening fussiness. Hopefully, that means calmer evenings and an easier time putting your baby to sleep at this age. But be careful to not let the newfound ease make you lax on bedtime routines; it’s still important to be consistent with bedtime and sleep cues so that your baby can learn how to go to sleep on their own. Of course, keep in mind that all babies are different, so your infant might have a longer experience of being fussy, too. content source

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Baby sleep facts and myths every parent should know

  During the first few weeks, newborn babies are asleep more than they are awake. A baby’s sleep needs are, on average, between 16 and 22 hours per 24-hour period. It varies a lot among babies, but it can also vary from day to day for the same baby. As a new parent, you might think that you’ve found a routine at the beginning. But it’s common that this changes frequently. The duration of your baby’s sleep periods can also change. On some days their waking and sleeping times are longer, and on other days your baby might sleep more but for shorter periods of time. Here are some facts related to baby's sleep: NEWBORN SLEEP PERIODS ARE SHORT A newborn baby usually sleeps around 18-20 hours a day. This sounds like a comfortable existence for new parents, doesn’t it? But then why do many new parents experience such a lack of sleep in the early days? It probably has to do with the duration of the sleep periods. A newborn sleeps for a while, is awake for a while and then falls asleep again. And it can be this way around the clock during the first few weeks. Eventually the baby will adapt to ‘our’ circadian rhythm, remaining awake for longer periods of time during the day and sleeping for several hours at night Just as with adults, a baby’s sleep is made up of different cycles of deep and light sleep. “A newborn does not sleep deeply all the time, but instead switches between sleeping deeply, being drowsy and sleeping lightly. In between, the baby is either awake and lively, alert and cranky, or screaming and crying.” FEELINGS OF HUNGER AND BEING FULL CONTROL HOW A NEWBORN SLEEP. In the first few weeks, food and sleep dominate the newborn’s world. Eating takes a lot of energy, making your baby tired and so making them fall asleep. And when they wake up again, hunger is often the cause. Newborn babies sleep according to their own internal clock and fall asleep when they need to. A change usually takes place around 4-7 weeks, when your baby begins to become curious about its surroundings and may sometimes need to be soothed to fall asleep. NEWBORNS FOLLOW THEIR SLEEP RHYTHM FROM THE WOMB So much of everything that happens when a baby is born is cleverly designed by nature. But the fact that newborn babies have a different circadian rhythm than their parents is less ingenious. No one is really sure why. Newborns tend to stick with the sleep pattern they had in the womb, sometimes a week after birth, sometimes up to several months. Almost all babies in the womb are more awake and active during the late evening and night, and sleep soundly during early morning and morning Naturally, this poses a challenge for many new parents. “Of course, it feels frustrating when your baby is awake when you want to sleep. But be patient when it comes to sleep – your baby will gradually begin to sleep longer through the night. A one-year-old will definitely have outgrown their newborn sleep cycle. There’s no user manual to follow when it comes to newborn sleep. But she’s happy to share some good pieces of advice and tips for new parents. Getting constant advice from your parents, in-laws, and friends about your baby’s sleep cycle? For new parents, one of the hardest things to do is understand how to manage to get some rest while making sure that the baby is resting enough too. You are probably overwhelmed at the thought that you are not going to get any shuteye once the baby arrives. What you need is the right information about good sleep and your baby. In fact, there are several myths about sleeping babies that you need to know about to ensure that your baby gets all the rest that he needs in these growing years. Myth 1: You get to decide when your baby sleeps and for how long. Newborn babies spend most of their time sleeping. That said, they will only sleep when their body is ready. Their waking up depends entirely on cues such as hunger or wetness of the diaper. Instead of creating a schedule, it is best that you follow your baby’s cues to ensure that he is well rested. Myth 2: Babies can be allowed to sleep on the side Sleeping on the back is not safe for babies as it can lead to them rolling over onto their stomach. This increases the risk of issues like Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. In fact, a campaign called “Back to Sleep” was initiated to urge parents to put babies to sleep on their back for safer and sounder sleep. Myth 3: Swaddling does not help put the baby to sleep Swaddling is one of the best and most tested techniques to get your baby to sleep. This is exceptionally calming for the baby. The only issue is that a tight wrap around the baby can lead to overheating. In addition to that, knowing the right position to swaddle the baby also makes all the difference. Learning this from your pediatrician can be very useful in helping your baby fall asleep faster. This is indeed not an outdated method as most people may suggest. Myth 4: If your baby sleeps in the car or during a stroll, it does not count. What matters is that your baby should have a sound sleep. This can even be away from his crib, and he will still get as much rest as he needs. If you notice that your baby has fallen asleep in an area outside the crib, you need to put him back in. Allow the baby to wake up on his own before you change his place of sleep. Myth 5: Babies sleep better when you add some rice cereal to their feeding bottle. This method is not proven to have any effect on the sleep cycle of children. In fact, it can also be quite risky to give your baby rice cereal when they are too young. Babies are unable to digest it until they are at least four months old.   Content source Featured image source

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Second Trimester Anomaly Scan

The anomaly scan or ultrasound level II scan is the most common scan of the second trimester. This scan can show – ·  how your baby is growing and check the fetal movements ·  make sure your baby's internal organs are developing well ·  detect certain birth defects in your baby ·  estimate the amount of amniotic fluid ·  check the umbilical cord and position of the placenta ·  check for markers of chromosomal abnormalities. ·  check your cervix and measure the birth canal All pregnant women have a scan at this point because if a problem is detected, the necessary precautions need to be taken. The anomaly scan is done between 18 and 20 weeks. Your doctor may ask you to have more scans during your second trimester if: You are carrying twins or more. Your anomaly scan showed a low lying placenta. You've had spotting or bleeding from the vagina. The anomaly scan revealed problems in your pregnancy that need to be monitored. You have a medical condition such as diabetes or hypertension. You have a history of premature labour or late miscarriage. You do not need a full bladder for this scan. At this stage, your baby is big enough and high enough in your abdomen to be seen very clearly.You will need to expose your tummy, so it is a good idea to wear loose or two-piece clothing such as a salwar kameez or maternity pants and a top. This will allow the ultrasound doctor to access your tummy easily. You may be more comfortable too as you will not have to bother about removing your clothing. Nearly all second trimester scans are done abdominally. The ultrasound doctor applies (usually very cold) gel to your tummy and moves the probe or transducer over it to obtain images of your baby. As sound waves from the transducer bounce off your baby's features or organs, images are formed on a computer screen.   The doctor will try his best to get as many angles of the baby in your tummy. When the doctor is able to get a clear picture of the baby, she/he will take measurements. Most hospitals or diagnostic centers allow you to watch the scan being done. It may be hard for you to make out your baby's organs, because the doctor will look at them in cross-section. Your baby's bones will appear white on the scan and soft tissues look grey and speckled. The amniotic fluid surrounding your baby will look black. The doctor will look at: The number of babies you are carrying. Twins are sometimes not found until 20 weeks.   The shape and structure of your baby's head. It is possible to detect severe brain problems at this stage, but fortunately these are very rare.   Your baby's face to check for a cleft lip. Cleft palates inside a baby's mouth are hard to see and are rarely picked up.   Your baby's spine, both along its length and in cross-section. This is done to make sure all the bones align and that the skin covers the spine at the back.   Your baby's abdominal wall, to make sure it covers all the internal organs at the front.   Your baby's heart. The top two chambers (atria) and the bottom two chambers (ventricles) should be equal in size. The valves should open and close with each heartbeat. The doctor will also examine the major veins and arteries which carry blood to and from your baby's heart.   Your baby's stomach. Your baby swallows some of the amniotic fluid that he lies in, which is seen in his stomach as a black bubble.   Your baby's kidneys. The doctor will check that your baby has two kidneys, and that urine flows freely into his bladder. If your baby's bladder is empty, it should fill up during the scan and be easy to see. Your baby has been passing urine every half an hour or so for some months now!   Your baby's arms, legs, hands and feet. The doctor will look at your baby's fingers and toes. In addition to this detailed look at how your baby is growing, the doctor will check: the placenta the umbilical cord the amniotic fluid The placenta will be described as low if it reaches down to or covers the neck of your uterus (cervix). If the placenta is lying low in your uterus, you'll have another scan in the third trimester to check its position. By then, it's likely the placenta will have moved away from your cervix. About 15 per cent of scans will need to be repeated for one reason or another. But this does not necessarily mean there is something wrong with your baby. Try not to panic in case something out of the normal routine shows up. Discuss it in detail with your doctor. Usually, your doctor will be able to reassure you.   Feature Image Scan            

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Baby feeding and sleeping schedule: Breastfeeding 4 to 6-month-old

A newborn’s sleep schedules take time to set and therefore it is very tough to get into a consistent routine before 4 months of age. Bedtimes can also be quite inconsistent and erratic in the first 3 months. Now that your baby is 4 months old, this is the perfect time to get your baby into a routine as they naturally settle into a 4-5 nap schedule. Here is your 4 month old breastfeeding schedule: 8am – Wake Up & Nurse 9:30am – Nap 11am – Nurse 12:00pm – Nap 2pm – Nurse 3pm – Nap 5pm – Nurse 6pm – Nap 8pm – Nurse / Bottle (We do a pumped bottle from 8pm onward) 8:30pm – 9pm Bed *Sometimes there is a middle of the night feed around 5am. It is common for baby to still get up 1-2x per night after the first 5-8 hour stretch at this age. Note: If your baby wakes up earlier, adjust the times above accordingly. For example, if your baby wakes up at 7am, then bedtime should be around 7:30-8pm. How many naps for a 4 month old? As you can see your 4 month old is napping 4 times a day now. This schedule has naturally emerged from following a 1.5-2 hour wake time in between naps and trying to do an “Eat, Activity, Sleep” schedule. The crucial point here is that you want to feed your baby AFTER they are awake. This way they are not associating nursing with going to sleep and will likely sleep better at night. This isn’t always possible to do this based on your baby’s nap schedule. Some days the schedule may get thrown off and you may have to nurse right before your baby goes to sleep. And that’s OK! Just try to implement it as often as you can. Naps at this age are typically 45 mins to an hour. Babies at this age haven’t yet learned to connect their sleep cycles so it’s common to have a nap that is just one sleep cycle. 4 month old babies usually nap 4-5 times a day. The key is that you’re wanting your baby to get 15-16 total hours of sleep a day (including naps & night time). How often to nurse a 4 month old? As far as nursing during the day is concerned, you may follow approximately 3 hours intervals in between nursing schedules. You may also nurse on demand and therefore if your baby gets hungry before 3 hours you may feed her. But, it will be ideal also to keep the 3 hours interval in mind. 4 Month Old Breastfeeding Schedule You don’t need to stick to a schedule to the T. Every day will be different and you can adapt and change it as you need to. The key elements of a schedule for a 4 month old is knowing that they will likely need at least 4 naps in the day. Carve out the approximate times for when those naps will be (morning, noon, early afternoon, late afternoon) and plan your day around that.   Content source Featured image source          

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5 Ways To Make Potty Training Fun