Pimples and Acne

Acne is a skin condition that occurs when your hair follicles become plugged with oil and dead skin cells.

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10 Ayurvedic Remedies For Acne During Pregnancy

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How To Get Rid Of Baby Acne

Home Treatments That Can Help Baby Acne

6 Natural Remedies For Pregnancy Acne

Many women experience acne during pregnancy. It’s most common during the first and second trimesters. An increase in hormones called androgens can cause the glands in your skin to grow and produce more sebum — an oily, waxy substance. This oil can clog pores and lead to bacteria, inflammation, and breakouts. Women who are prone to breakouts during their menstrual periods have a greater likelihood of pregnancy acne, according to March of Dimes. Fortunately, pregnancy and postpartum acne is usually temporary. It will likely clear up once your hormones return to normal. Here are some tips for treating pregnancy acne, from all-natural remedies to daily skin care do’s and don’ts. Apple cider vinegar Mix one part raw, unfiltered apple cider vinegar to three parts distilled water. This will create a toner that is rich in naturally occurring enzymes and alpha hydroxy acids. Soak a cotton ball with the diluted apple cider vinegar mixture and apply to your skin to absorb oil. It is important to dilute the apple cider vinegar with the distilled water, and if excessive dryness occurs, this treatment should be discontinued. Do not use undiluted vinegar on skin, as it is very acidic and can cause burns. Baking soda Baking soda dries the oil on your skin and promotes healing, but it is not widely recommended by healthcare professionals because it can irritate the skin and remove important protective oils. It might be best used as a spot treatment for breakouts. Make a natural spot treatment by mixing 1 tablespoon of baking soda with 1 tablespoon of water. Apply to individual pimples, not the entire body or face. Allow it to dry before washing off. Citrus fruit Alpha hydroxy acid is found in citrus fruit like lemons and limes. When the juice of a lemon or lime is applied to your skin, it helps unclog pores and shed dead skin cells. These astringent and antibacterial properties make it effective as an exfoliant. Squeeze the juice from a lemon or lime and apply directly to spots with a cotton ball. Leave on for 10 minutes or until dry, and then rinse with cool water. Honey Honey has antibacterial and antiseptic properties. It’s also soothing to the skin. To apply, first rinse your face with warm water. Apply honey directly to the affected area. Leave it on your skin for 20 to 30 minutes. Rinse with warm water. Coconut oil Coconut oil has antibacterial and antifungal propertiesTrusted Source. It’s also soothing to the skin and very easily absorbed. Apply virgin coconut oil instead of a moisturizer before going to sleep. Cucumber and oatmeal Cucumber and oatmeal offer soothing and cooling properties for the skin. For a homemade treatment, try this mask from Wholefully. It uses all-natural ingredients commonly found in the kitchen. Simply blend, put in the freezer, and apply to your face for 10 to 15 minutes before washing off. General skincare tips Don’t over-wash Washing your skin too much removes its natural moisture. This can then increase oil production and make you more prone to breakouts. Very hot water can also dry out your skin. The Mayo Clinic recommends using a mild, soap-free cleanser with cool or lukewarm water in the morning, at night, and after heavy sweating. Avoid scrubbing Aim for gentle exfoliation instead. Use your hands or a soft washcloth with gentle pressure and cleanse skin in a circular motion. Wash and rinse thoroughly. Pat skin dry instead of rubbing and follow with a gentle, oil-free moisturizer. Best practices Caring for your skin during pregnancy doesn’t have to be difficult. Here are some best practices to help your skin stay beautiful, glowing, and free of acne. Don’t pop, pick, scratch, or squeeze acne sores. This can increase irritation and cause scarring. Keep your skin hydrated by drinking purified water. Avoid carbonated beverages and too much caffeine. Eat a nutritious diet with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean sources of protein, and healthy fats like avocado and nuts. Avoid refined sugars and processed foods. Give yourself time to rest and relax. Stress and fatigue can trigger acne outbreaks. Change your pillowcases and towels often. Avoid touching your face, which can introduce bacteria. Wash your hair regularly, particularly if it’s oily, and try to keep it off your face. If you wear makeup, use oil-free products labeled “non-comedogenic” or “non-acnegenic.” Mare sure to wash off your makeup before going to bed. Always consult with your doctor before using over-the-counter treatments. Some ingredients in common skin care products, like salicylic acid and vitamin A, may not be safe to use during pregnancy. content source Featured image source

Ek funny SA question for all preggies Kis kis ki sakal pregnancy k time main bht gandi c ho gyi hai Mean ESA lgta h face bht dwn ho gya h colour bht dark ho gya gnde se dark circlesz,🙂😭🤣🥰

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)- an overview

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder common among women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS may have infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods or excess male hormone (androgen) levels. The ovaries may develop numerous small collections of fluid (follicles) and fail to regularly release eggs. The exact cause of PCOS is unknown. Early diagnosis and treatment along with weight loss may reduce the risk of long-term complications such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of PCOS often develop around the time of the first menstrual period during puberty. Sometimes PCOS develops later, for example, in response to substantial weight gain. Signs and symptoms of PCOS vary. A diagnosis of PCOS is made when you experience at least two of these signs: Irregular periods. Infrequent, irregular or prolonged menstrual cycles are the most common sign of PCOS. For example, you might have fewer than nine periods a year, more than 35 days between periods and abnormally heavy periods. Excess androgen. Elevated levels of male hormone may result in physical signs, such as excess facial and body hair (hirsutism), and occasionally severe acne and male-pattern baldness. Polycystic ovaries. Your ovaries might be enlarged and contain follicles that surround the eggs. As a result, the ovaries might fail to function regularly. PCOS signs and symptoms are typically more severe if you're obese. When to see a doctor See your doctor if you have concerns about your menstrual periods, if you're experiencing infertility or if you have signs of excess androgen such as worsening hirsutism, acne and male-pattern baldness. Causes The exact cause of PCOS isn't known. Factors that might play a role include: Excess insulin. Insulin is the hormone produced in the pancreas that allows cells to use sugar, your body's primary energy supply. If your cells become resistant to the action of insulin, then your blood sugar levels can rise and your body might produce more insulin. Excess insulin might increase androgen production, causing difficulty with ovulation. Low-grade inflammation. This term is used to describe white blood cells' production of substances to fight infection. Research has shown that women with PCOS have a type of low-grade inflammation that stimulates polycystic ovaries to produce androgens, which can lead to heart and blood vessel problems. Heredity. Research suggests that certain genes might be linked to PCOS. Excess androgen. The ovaries produce abnormally high levels of androgen, resulting in hirsutism and acne. Complications Complications of PCOS can include: Infertility Gestational diabetes or pregnancy-induced high blood pressure Miscarriage or premature birth Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis — a severe liver inflammation caused by fat accumulation in the liver Metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that significantly increase your risk of cardiovascular disease Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes Sleep apnea Depression, anxiety and eating disorders Abnormal uterine bleeding Cancer of the uterine lining (endometrial cancer) Obesity is associated with PCOS and can worsen complications of the disorder. content source

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Symptoms of infertility

Infertility is when you cannot get pregnant after having unprotected, regular sex for six months to one year, depending on your age. The main symptom of infertilityis not getting pregnant. You may not have or notice any other symptoms. Symptoms can also depend on what is causing the infertility. Many health conditions can make it hard to get pregnant. Sometimes no cause is found. Signs of Potential Infertility in Women In women, changes in the menstrual cycle and ovulation may be a symptom of a disease related to infertility. Symptoms include: Abnormal periods. Bleeding is heavier or lighter than usual. Irregular periods. The number of days in between each period varies each month. No periods. You have never had a period, or periods suddenly stop. Painful periods. Back pain, pelvic pain, and cramping may happen. Sometimes, female infertility is related to a hormone problem. In this case, symptoms can also include: Skin changes, including more acne Changes in sex drive and desire Dark hair growth on the lips, chest, and chin Loss of hair or thinning hair Weight gain Other symptoms of disorders that may lead to infertility include: Milky white discharge from nipples unrelated to breastfeeding Pain during sex Many other things can be related to infertility in women, and their symptoms vary. Signs of Potential Infertility in Men Infertility symptoms in men can be vague. They may go unnoticed until a man tries to have a baby. Symptoms depend on what is causing the infertility. They can include: Changes in hair growth Changes in sexual desire Pain, lump, or swelling in the testicles Problems with erections and ejaculation Small, firm testicles When to See the Doctor If you are under 35 and have been trying to get pregnant without success for a year, see your doctor. Women 35 and older should see their doctor after six months of trying. Blood, urine, and imaging tests can be done to discover why you are having trouble getting pregnant. A sperm analysis can be done to check a man's sperm count and the overall health of the sperm. Your doctor may refer you to a reproductive endocrinologist. That's a doctor who specializes in infertility. You will be asked questions about your infertility symptoms and medical history. Before you go to the doctor, write down the following information and take it to your next doctor's appointment: All the medications you take, including prescriptions, vitamins, minerals, supplements, and any other drugs bought without a prescription How often you have unprotected sex, how long you have been trying, and the date of the last time you tried to get pregnant Body changes or other symptoms you have noticed Dates of any surgeries or treatments in the past, especially those involving the reproductive tract. Any radiation or chemotherapy you have had How much you smoke, how much alcohol you drink, and any illegal drug use Any history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) Any genetic disorder or chronic illness, such as diabetes or thyroid disease, in you or your family Listen to your body. Tell your doctor any time you notice a symptom. Early diagnosis of an infertility problem may improve your odds of getting pregnant. content source

5 Signs to Indicate that you're going to have a baby girl

There are plenty of popular beliefs and myths that claim to predict early boy or girl signs. And while it’s tempting to think that you can absolutely determine your baby’s gender through physical symptoms, medical research has debunked many of these myths. Here is the truth about 5 supposed pregnancy signs for a girl: Carrying the baby high One of the most common myths surrounding baby gender says that having a higher bump means you’re having a girl. However, this has been shown to be a myth. The biggest factors that determine the way your bump looks are your physical condition, the amount of pregnancies you’ve had, your abdominal muscles physical shape, and your total weight gain during pregnancy. Being stressed out before conception Another popular belief is that your stress levels before you get pregnant can play a role in determining your baby’s gender. And surprisingly, scientific studies have found a correlation between these two facts. A study revealed that women with higher cortisol levels - the stress hormone -were more likely to have a girl. However, the reason for this hasn’t been discovered yet. Mood swings Some people think that the estrogen that baby girls produce can affect the mother’s humour, causing mood swings. However, scientific studies have found that this isn’t true. All pregnant women can suffer from mood swings due to their own hormones fluctuating during gestation. But these mood changes aren’t related to your baby’s gender! Having more morning sickness Another popular belief states that since girls produce more hormones, their mothers will suffer from a more severe case of morning sickness. But science and experience have both shown that morning sickness can vary from women to women. The same women can even experience different levels of morning sickness during different pregnancies. One study, published in the medical journal The Lancet, did find a small correlation between severe morning sickness and the probability of having a girl. However, their evidence wasn’t conclusive, so this myth remains… well, a myth. Having acne or dull skin Have you ever heard the saying that a baby girl steals her mother’s beauty? Some people believe that if you’re having a girl, you’ll develop oily or dull skin, and lots of acne. But this is just another false belief. Pregnancy hormone can be unpredictable, and they’ll affect each woman’s skin and hair differently.   5 signs that you're having a boy Craving salty foods Research has shown that anywhere between 50% to 90% of all pregnant women experience food cravings at some point during their pregnancy. And a popular belief states that women carrying girls will crave more sweets. They also think that if you’re having a boy, you’ll crave mostly savory and salty foods. The truth is that a woman’s cravings are more likely to be related to their nutritional requirements than to the gender of their baby. So this one isn’t really a pregnancy symptom for a boy. Lower fetal heart rate Another baby sex myth claims that if your baby’s heart rate is around 140 beats per minute, it’s a boy. A faster heartbeat would mean that you’re carrying a girl. But scientific studies have shown that there isn’t a significant difference between the heartbeats of female and male fetuses. In fact, male fetuses tend to have a slightly faster heartbeat, but it’s only by about 3 beats per minute. Carrying low Just like carrying high is supposed to mean that you’re having a baby, it’s widely believed that a lower bump means your baby is a boy. But there’s no evidence to back up this theory. As we stated above, the shape of your bump is determined by other factors.  Healthier hair and skin This is the opposite of the myth that having a girl will “take away your beauty”. A lot of people believe that if you’re carrying a boy, your skin will look healthier and you’ll have thick, lustrous hair. But in reality, these changes depend solely on pregnancy hormones. Some women can develop skin pigmentation or acne, while others will have thicker hair and a “pregnancy glow”. No mood swings Does anyone really believe that having a boy means that pregnant women will avoid mood swings? Unfortunately, it’s not true! You’re just as likely to experience mood swings whether you’re having a boy or a girl. They’re a very common occurrence for many pregnant women. content source

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7 most embarrassing pregnancy Symptoms

You knew that your belly would expand, you'd feel more tired than usual, and you might throw up a few times as your pregnancy progressed. But you may not have expected some of the other physical changes. These aren't things that a woman usually talks about- so it's no wonder there's a bit of embarrassment. Despite the embarrassment, it’s most important to not be shy: Your ob-gyn needs to know what's going on with you to make sure your pregnancy is on track. 1. Excess Gas- Virtually every pregnant woman gets gassy. That's because pregnancy brings a hormonal surge that can slow down your gastrointestinal tract.You might not be able to keep it to yourself because you don't have the same control over your muscles during pregnancy. Though you can't erase the problem, you can reduce your tendency toward gassiness with exercise and changes to your diet. 2. Incontinence- Most pregnant women who experience stress incontinence -- involuntarily leaking urine because of a jarring cough, sneeze, or laugh -- only lose a few drops. Many doctors recommend that women wear panty liners to catch leaks during the last few months of pregnancy when stress incontinence is more likely. Regular trips to the bathroom can also help. 3. Facial Hair- During pregnancy, hormones are responsible for hair growing in unwanted places. Waxing or tweezing is the safest methods for hair removal during pregnancy. Professor Kim Hoover, MD, says. "During pregnancy, laser treatments on the face can affect skin pigment, and it may cause scarring." 4. Odors- Some women develop a stronger sense of smell during pregnancy. Many develop an aversion to strong food odors, such as poultry or seafood. Tell your doctor about any new noticeable vaginal odors to rule out a yeast infection, which can be safely treated with anti-fungals during pregnancy. 5. Hemorrhoids- They often occur with constipation and the straining that ensues in an attempt to have a bowel movement. Reduce your risk of developing hemorrhoids by avoiding constipation. Stay well-hydrated, eat more fiber, and use over-the-counter stool softeners. 6. Acne- Pimples and unsightly outbreaks are common especially during the first trimester, because of the additional hormones coursing through your system. "Most acne washes are safe since the product does not sit on your skin for long periods of time. But ask your doctor before using any acne product," Hakakha says. "Use topical acne medication sparingly, only on affected areas. Products containing salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and azelaic acid are safe to use in small amounts." 7. Intimacy Issues-Weight gain and other physical changes can make you feel unattractive around your partner. Don't let that lead to communication and intimacy problems. f you're having trouble broaching this topic with your partner, consider inviting your partner to an ob-gyn visit, particularly if you've discussed your intimacyissues with your doctor at a previous appointment. Content Source Feature Image Source